New guy with questions


PDA






2popfire
May 18, 2010, 12:58 PM
I'd like to introduce myself and ask a question at the same time.
My name is Joe Murray and I'm just beginning to collect the equipment and knowledge to reload my own brass, joining this forum is part of that effort.
I have a background as a machinist and tool and die work, so close tolerance measuring and consistency are well known to me. Sadly I no longer work in the trade due to the state of our countries ever shrinking manufacturing strength. So now I find myself working as armed security, and falling back on shooting skills learned as a boy and to maintain my qualifications means shooting a lot more and that brings me to reloading.
I have been lurking in this forum for a couple of weeks now and there is no doubt that I'm in the right place because the knowledge to be found among you guy's is just outstanding.
So...
I would like to reload for my duty weapon which is the Glock model 23 in .40 S&W and from what I read there is some question as to the safety of shooting reloads through the stock barrel. Is this true? I would not be trying to make hot loads for this caliber but only to replicate standard factory ammo. But I cannot change barrels on the duty gun. I have the identical pistol which I use for practice and concealed carry.
I have also just bought my first wheelgun a Uberti Frontier in .45 Colt with a 5-1/2" barrel which is a knock off of the Remington. I will be reloading for that too. I'm still waiting for delivery on the .45 I hate to wait!!
Thanks in advance for all your help.
Joe

If you enjoyed reading about "New guy with questions" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
ranger335v
May 18, 2010, 02:05 PM
I'm not a Glock expert but it appears they, the .40s anyway, have a cut-out in the bottom of the chamber to aid feeding from the magazine. Not a big cut, but enough to allow a bulge to form in the head of fired cases. It can be difficult to remove that bulge with conventional sizers and that can inhibit smooth chambering of reloaded cases. And they are not made for "hot" reloads.

A LOT of things have led to a loss of manufactoring jobs in the US. A lot of them rise from silly and excessive government rules, regulations and TAXES that force management to seek lower cost production options. Sorry you got caught in that.

Welcome aboard!

Frankl03
May 18, 2010, 02:52 PM
Welcome to the high road! I have a clock 37, 45 gap that I reload for. Compared to loading for rifles, handgun is a breeze! Its also very economical considering the amount of powder, cost of brass etc.

I'm somewhat new to pistol reloading and I hadn't heard of an issue with Glock barrels. With a machinist background you will have no problems with handloading! I only have one firearm I don't reload for and that's a 22 pistol.

Good luck in getting started! If you have questions this is a good place to ask.

Arkansas Paul
May 18, 2010, 03:25 PM
We handload .40 and it's a breeze. My brother shoots them through his Glock 22 with no problems what so ever. Our favorite powder for the .40 is Bullseye.

You're going to have a blast with that .45 Colt as well. I love mine. Since you're new to loading, give Trail Boss a whirl when you start loading for it. It is a very dense powder that will fill a lot of the case. (Less chance of double charging) I love 230 grain lead bullets and 6.5 grains of Trail Boss for plinking. It's light recoiling and very accurate. The velocities aren't that high, as it's used a lot for cowboy action shooting.

Welcome to THR. Hope this helps.

Paul

Slinger
May 18, 2010, 05:01 PM
I reload for my GLOCK 34. I only use FMJ or encapsulated bullets in my reloads. I tried a batch of lead bullets but had very poor results with accuracy plus the barrel was a mess after only 100 rounds. Get a good reloading manual.

30Remington
May 18, 2010, 05:08 PM
I don't own a Glock; but I understand there might be a problem shooting lead bullets through them. You can reload with jacketed bullets and you will be fine. I reload for a Smith M&P in .40 and we pick up any used casings we can find even if from a Glock. Never had a problem with the sizing die ironing out the bulges.

Doogledog
May 18, 2010, 05:11 PM
I can't remember who makes it but someone out there makes a special sizing die just for "the bulge". I personally load for my model 23C with standard equipment with no problems.

JimKirk
May 18, 2010, 05:28 PM
Redding G-Rx for Glocked 40 S&W and 357 SIG.
BDS will be along shortly to tell you to get a Lone Wolf barrel to replace your Glock barrel. It does have better support.

Lee makes a kit that goes in the Facrory Crimp Die which will remove the bulge.

I own the Redding so I know it works.

Jimmy K

RustyFN
May 18, 2010, 05:57 PM
I'm not a Glock expert but it appears they, the .40s anyway, have a cut-out in the bottom of the chamber to aid feeding from the magazine. Not a big cut, but enough to allow a bulge to form in the head of fired cases. It can be difficult to remove that bulge with conventional sizers and that can inhibit smooth chambering of reloaded cases. And they are not made for "hot" reloads.

Ranger is right on here. It was mostly a problem with the earlier Glocks like Gen 1, not so much with the later Glocks. As was already said don't load them hot and it's no different than loading for any other gun. I doubt you will be loading lead bullets but wanted to warn against it. It can be done safe from an experienced loader but I wouldn't recommend it. Jacketed and plated bullets will be fine. I shoot a lot of plated bullets in my G 17.

Also welcome to the forum.

UltimateReloader
May 18, 2010, 10:13 PM
If it has not been stated already, Redding has a product called the GRX die, and Lee has the "Bulge Buster" that can be used to remove the Glock bulge.

Would anyone be interested in an article on reloading for Glocks? (featuring the use of these products)

2popfire
May 19, 2010, 02:01 AM
Thank's one and all. I'm new here and just beginning to get into reloading and it's great to get so much feed back so fast.

Ultimatereloader, I would be glad to see anything you have on reloading for the Glock.

UltimateReloader
May 19, 2010, 10:22 AM
Cool- haven't produced such an article/video yet, but I'll put that on the list :)

rick300
May 19, 2010, 11:07 PM
I'm new also. I always start with that so you can take it with however grains you may, I don't shoot a Glock, but pick up brass at the range. You can see the bulge as soon as you pick them up. I put them through the resizer die and then through a case gauge. If they don't fit I put them back in the resizer (half a turn off) and then back in the gauge. After that most pass the case gauge test. If they don't pass I put them into a baggie and I'm saving these 'till I have enough to warrant buying the GRX Die from Redding.
Hope this helps and be safe, Rick

blackwalnut
May 19, 2010, 11:37 PM
The Glock has polygonal rifling which is designed for jacketed bullets. The rifling causes the bullet to seal better and also is conducive to longer barrel life. Glock 21 pistols began to use conventional rifling in order to satisfy the U.S. market and the vast hordes of .45 ACP reloaders who use lead bullets. Polygonal rifling and original Glock barrels give up nothing in quality or accuracy. Regarding the bulge in Glock brass (.40) this is caused by the very rear of the case being unsupported by the chamber due to design. Gaston Glock is not too concerned about .40 reloaders in the USA as they have approximately 65-70% of the law enforcement market. Reloading is not an issue. Other high pressure pistol cartridges like the 38 super in governmental models also bulge the case too which is why IPSC shootrer or is it IDPA reload with a special version of the case that has a thicker web in the case head. I would reload 40s using proper procedures and that means case inspection and data from proper loading manuals. Incidentally the new 4th generations Glock 22s have a different chamber design that supports the case more. I would bet that 10mms, 38 supers of course and overloaded 9s and 45 Acps will bulge too. If your new to reloading read your manual thoroughly before you do anything. A friend of mine started piercing primes on his 40 caliber Springfield Trophy Match and of course blamed the primers. In the end it was his own treachery and common knowledge that caused the problem. After all isnt a .40 just like a .45? No the 40 operates at considerably higher pressure. He changed the recoil spring and firing pins spring because he was applying bullseye shooter common knowledge and practice so he could shoot lighter loads. The gun unlocked sooner than normal and the firing pins damaged the primers because it didnt get out the way sooner.

Springfield very kindly sent him new springs. We will see what happens. Anyway I digress just read the manual first. Good Luck. My experience with reloading for autos is with 38 super, 9mm and 45 ACP and i have never had a problem. Follow the manual.

bds
May 21, 2010, 03:34 AM
2popfire, welcome to THR!

BDS will be along shortly to tell you to get a Lone Wolf barrel to replace your Glock barrel. It does have better support.
:eek::eek::eek: But only for shooting high volumes of lead bullets :D
I do shoot lead bullets in factory Glock barrels, but I inspect/clean them frequently (~200 rounds).

I use factory Glock barrels for jacketed/plated reloads.

JimKirk
May 21, 2010, 07:45 AM
bds ... you're late .... where you been:D Man you are getting slow:D

All joking aside, I been looking at a Lone Wolf barrel for my 357 SIG to shot lead in. I have a good pile of it and looks like the Obama gang will outlaw it soon, so I had better shot some of it before they tax me to death on it.

Jimmy K

ljnowell
May 21, 2010, 09:13 AM
Welcome to THR Joe! Pull up a chair and stay awhile, its a good place to hang out. I would not worry about shooting reloads out of that glock at all. Just keep an eye on the brass, if it starts bulging at the case head, you need to back off the charge some.

2popfire
May 21, 2010, 01:45 PM
OK, so... I should be able to keep from exploding gun syndrome if I just:

1. Follow the manual

2. Stick to "standard" charges

3. inspect brass carefully and use a bulge buster

4. use FMJ or fully encapsulated bullets

5. check carefully for double charges

How am I doin'??

you guys are great

Joe :)

rcmodel
May 21, 2010, 02:13 PM
Try it before you waste money on a "bulge buster" die.

I have reloaded for my 1st. gen Model 23 for 15+ years and never have seen the slightest problem with either bulged cases, or resizing them in a standard RCBS sizing die.

If you pick up brass at the range with severe bulging, somebody with less then average common sense was trying to make a 10mm out of a .40 S&W load.

rc

If you enjoyed reading about "New guy with questions" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!