1911 hammer?


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Grim Peeper
May 24, 2010, 02:11 PM
Hey yall I was just wondering what the point was of the multiple hammer sets of the 1911. On one of mine It pulls back just a tad sets and can be droped by the trigger then cocks back half way as well and locks. on my other 1911 also a springer it just sets in the first and last positions. Whats the functional point of these multiple trigger postions.

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Grim Peeper
May 24, 2010, 02:25 PM
The one on the right is the new one. The other is the one that the trigger sets in two positions sprindfield says it was made in 1995 as a loaded model.

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Grim Peeper
May 24, 2010, 03:56 PM
Are the hammer positions there for carrying purpose or readiness reasons. I cant find an anwser anywhere? Sorry this may be a dumb simple question.

Dimis
May 24, 2010, 06:07 PM
ok this may just be purely speculation but ive HEARD that the original 1911 half cock was closer to the stike position to ensure that when let lose it didnt have enough juice to ignite a round and the newer (series 80 i think) half cock is a locked possition without hammerfall

now my speculation is that somehow your hammer has both "half cock" positions and the full rearward (fireing) possition maybe a modified hammer?!?! again this is just speculation and no factual evidence to that so take it for what it is and i hope that helps till one of the experts shows up lol

Grim Peeper
May 24, 2010, 06:37 PM
I ve looked at both hammers out of the gun and there is two catches on one and one on the other and of course full cocking on both. I am really wondering why even a half cocked position. Im guessing probally to eliminate an accidental misfire when wrapping the slide. Say if the slide is attemped to be cycled and doesnt acheive full cycle that the first catch is to act as a hammer saftey. Can anyone confirm this for me?

Oro
May 24, 2010, 09:20 PM
Yes, the 1911 was designed with that extra notch as a safety, and as you described. If a mechanical failure or mis-handling happens, the last notch will catch on the sear and prevent discharge. Older styles had "hooks" to grab the sear, newer designs just have a shelf design, but both work for this purpose.

BullfrogKen
May 24, 2010, 09:38 PM
As Oro pointed out, that other notch is there to catch the hammer if it un-intentionally slips off the sear.

Greg528iT
May 24, 2010, 11:48 PM
As explained to me.. it's part of the barrel contact safety ( gun won't go off if pressed hard against something) (sorry I have a brain cramp).. but if you want the gun to not go off when pressed against something, you certainly don't want it to go off just after you pulled it back away. (welll maybe you might). Once the hammer drops and is prevented from striking the firing pin (out of battery firinging) you would not want the hammer to be sitting on the F pin as you pull the gun back.

Steve C
May 25, 2010, 04:31 AM
Typical 70 series and earlier 1911 pistols and clones have a half cock notch on the hammer that is there to prevent discharge if the hammer slips from the shooters thumb when cocking the handgun with chamber loaded. If the hammer slips before reaching the half cock position there isn't enough hammer drop to result in a discharge in theory.

On the 80 series and later 1911's Colt changed the mechanism from a half cock notch to what they call a "safety shelf" that is at a lower position in travel than the half cock notch but performs the same function. The safety shelf catches performs the same function as the half cock notch. The main difference is that the hammer can be dropped by pulling the trigger when its held by the safety shelf. There's not enough hammer drop to set a round off from this even lower position.

The safety shelf prevents the unsafe practice of carrying the pistol with the hammer on the half cock position which is not a safe position for carry as a blow to the hammer if the gun where to be dropped can shear the sear tip in this shallow notch dropping the hammer and discharging the pistol. Both the shallow hammer position and the firing pin block prevents this on 80 series pistol.

On one of mine It pulls back just a tad sets and can be droped by the trigger then cocks back half way as well and locks.

This sounds like one model is a transition version where Springfield kept both systems of hammer slip controls before following Colts design on their 80 series on the other.

Thingster
May 26, 2010, 01:42 AM
Or as I was of fond of saying to a buddy with an 80 series, "My half cock is bigger than yours!"

His "1/2" cocked just off the hammer on the safety shelf and mine was a pre-70 design with the full 1/2 cock and the captured safety shelf.

Grim Peeper
May 26, 2010, 01:36 PM
Thanks guys this thread perfectly answered all of my questions and more.:D

Walkalong
May 26, 2010, 01:47 PM
As explained to me.. it's part of the barrel contact safety ( gun won't go off if pressed hard against something) (sorry I have a brain cramp).. but
The disconnector is activated if you push the slide back even a little, keeping the gun from firing. (Assuming the hammer was cocked and could have fired) If the slide was pushed back far enough to lift the hammer off the sear, it would just settle back down on the sear when let forward. If it somehow missed the sear, the safety notch would catch it, unless the trigger is being held back at the time. Mot likely slide would go forward so slowly, that even if the trigger was being held, the hammer would not have enough enertia to fire the gun.

Greg528iT
May 26, 2010, 04:52 PM
Walk.. yes you are right, if the slide is only depressed enough to keep the hammer from striking the firing pin, a release would not have enough inertia to let off a round. When my father in law showed me , my 1st to be held 1911, he demonstrated that with the slide pushed in (with enough force to fully plug a barrel) that the hammer would fall, not strike the pin, then be left in the half cocked position, and thus a "safety" feature. His Airforce service dates were about1952-1956. Might have been the teaching of the time. AND not that I believe all comic books, but an earlier BATMAN, had Batman tied in a chair, with a 45 to his head, where he then pushed the slide to open battery and thus could not fire and the bad guy failed to re cock the hammer off half cocked. So maybe self defense wise, it's a liability??????? I'm just saying. :neener:

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