Lockheed Martin $3.9M Contract to Develop Advanced Rifle Scope


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chieftain
May 27, 2010, 04:50 PM
For your consideration

From Defense Industry Daily:


DARPA Awards Lockheed Martin $3.9M Contract to Develop Advanced Rifle Scope for Soldiers

AKRON, Ohio, May 26th, 2010 -- The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] a $3.93 million contract to develop a rifle-scope attachment to enhance soldiers’ marksmanship capabilities.

The Dynamic Image Gunsight Optic or DInGO system will enable soldiers to accurately view targets at varying distances without changing scopes or suffering a decrease in optical resolution. The system will enhance soldiers’ ability to accurately hit targets at a range of between three and 600 meters.

DInGO automatically calculates the range with a low power laser rangefinder, digitally zooms in on it and accounts for environmental conditions such as wind using sensors built into the scope. It then projects the bullet’s point-of-impact calculated from the embedded ballistics computer.

“Current scopes are optimized for a single target range, impacting soldiers’ effectiveness and survivability when engaging targets at different distances during a single mission,” said Dan Schultz, vice president and general manager of Lockheed Martin’s Mission Systems & Sensors Ship & Aviation Systems business. “DInGO will solve this problem, significantly increasing soldiers’ ability to rapidly reconfigure optics for use from short to long ranges and improving marksmanship capabilities for all soldiers.”

DInGO is based on Lockheed Martin’s One Shot Advanced Sighting System, which utilizes similar precision engagement technology to automatically transmit crosswind information to a long-range sniper’s scope and modify the crosshairs to display exactly where the bullet will strike.

DARPA awarded Lockheed Martin an 18-month, $9.7 million contract in 2008 to integrate One Shot’s new crosswind measurement technology into a prototype spotter scope – a small telescope that is carried by sniper teams and is used to bring far-away objects into close view. During tactical field tests in December 2009, snipers were able to engage targets twice as quickly and increase their probability of a first-round hit by a factor of two using the One Shot technology at distances beyond 1,000 meters.

The nine-month Phase 1 contract, with options for additional phases, calls for Lockheed Martin to develop the DInGO system for use on the M-4 and M-16 automatic rifles. Work will be performed at Lockheed Martin’s Akron, Ohio, site, which has a strong track record for developing laser technology for ship and airborne infrared countermeasures, communications, wind correction and active sensing.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 136,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation reported 2009 sales of $45.2 billion.


Go figure.

Fred

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Texas Gun Person
May 27, 2010, 04:52 PM
Huh... I was unaware.


I work at Lockheed Martin in Fort Worth. :)

General Geoff
May 27, 2010, 04:57 PM
Anyone have details on the bidding for this contract? I'd be interested to see what other companies competed for this project.

Straight Shooter
May 27, 2010, 05:07 PM
I've thought about a scope like this before. It would be more of a heads-up display since you are not looking at a true target but an image that's been corrected based on distance and wind.

The only sticking point I see is that the wind calculations are being done on sensors on the scope. That won't tell you what the wind conditions are like 600 yards downrange.

Rittmeister
May 27, 2010, 05:22 PM
Seems like the laser rangefinder would point right back to your position, if the other guy is looking at you through the right kind of goggles.

wishin
May 27, 2010, 05:29 PM
For a company that builds the F-22, this should be a walk in the park. How does a fighter plane engage multiple target simultaneously from miles away? The problem is the scope will probably cost tens of thousands $ per copy before it's all said and done.

rmfnla
May 27, 2010, 06:05 PM
It needs to be portable, too.

An F-22 has a bit more room for technology than a spotting scope.

Jon_Snow
May 27, 2010, 07:06 PM
The only sticking point I see is that the wind calculations are being done on sensors on the scope. That won't tell you what the wind conditions are like 600 yards downrange.

Actually, through the use of laser doppler measurements, you can measure the wind at several points along the bullet's path. If you couldn't then this whole project would be a huge waste of money.

During tactical field tests in December 2009, snipers were able to engage targets twice as quickly and increase their probability of a first-round hit by a factor of two using the One Shot technology at distances beyond 1,000 meters.

A little off-topic, but if this is true then our soldiers must currently have a first round hit rate less than 50%. Is this really the case or is it the usual misrepresentation of statistics?

Straight Shooter
May 27, 2010, 08:55 PM
This is really interesting technology. I've been trying to find out more information but the best I could do is find the scope of the project. The results of the tests are classified.

From Wired: (http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/05/darpa-wants-super-sniper-rifles-in-shooters-hands-by-2011/#ixzz0oxa9aQBF)
The “One Shot (http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2007/04/darpa_snipers/)” program originally aimed to give snipers the power to hit a target from 2000 meters away in winds as high as 40 miles per hour. In the first phases of the 3-year-old program, shooters used prototype rifles dressed with lasers and fancy computer hardware to do damage from 1,100 meters away in 18-mile-an-hour winds.
Actually, through the use of laser doppler measurementsJon, it looks like they are in the process of developing or have developed a new technology, here is the pertinent text from the scope:

Although substantial efforts have been made over the last decade in measuring crosswind, two approaches have been commonly used. These are, namely a) Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and b) Coherent Doppler Lidar. Although these techniques are useful for some applications, they do not seem to be adequate for this application. Here is a link to the scope of the project (http://www.darpa.mil/sto/solicitations/oneshot/index.html)

Here is the text:
Advanced Sighting System (One-Shot)

BAA07-03

Posted Date: December 22, 2006
Response Date: February 05, 2007

Fedbizopps Reference (http://www.darpa.mil/leavingdarpa.asp?goto_url=https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=9bafd20629bf798e1b084fb2582a4b34&tab=core&_cview=0)


Description

BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT (BAA) 07-03 Advanced Sighting System (One-Shot) CLOSING DATE: One year from the date of publication in www.fbo.gov (http://www.darpa.mil/leavingdarpa.asp?goto_url=http://www.fbo.gov); PROPOSALS FOR FIRST SELECTIONS DUE: 4:00 p.m., Arlington, VA local time, February 5, 2007. POC: Deepak Varshneya, DARPA/STO; Email: BAA07-03@darpa.mil

The proposers are advised to obtain the Proposer's Information Pamphlet (PIP) associated with BAA 07-03 and take its additional requirements into consideration when formulating their proposals. The BAA and the PIP together constitute the full BAA for this project.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE AND DESCRIPTION: The objective of Advanced Sighting System (One-Shot) program is to enable Snipers to accurately hit targets with the first round, under crosswind conditions, at the maximum effective range of the weapon (RE). For this purpose, the system developed must provide a measure of downrange crosswind (wind) and range to target. This information will then be used to compensate the bullet trajectory to offset crosswind and range related bullet deviations resulting in substantially increased success of kill. The system must operate over a range of visibilities, atmospheric turbulence and scintillation, and environmental operating conditions and exploit novel technologies that address the overall requirements of this program. It is anticipated that the ultimate system culminating from this investigation and development will provide performance summarized in Annex to BAA 07-03 (Classified). The development work will be conducted in two Phases 1 and 2; with Phase 1 objective being "Feasibility Demonstration" while Phase 2 "Packaging of the System".

It is recognized that crosswind has the effect of deviating the bullet trajectory producing offsets in the hit point. In some cases, a 10mph wind could produce a miss even at 400 meters while in other cases the deviation could be much worse, exceeding 3 meters at 1200 meters range. The deviation increases as the wind velocity and/or the engagement range increases. Current methods to compensate the bullet trajectory, under adverse combat conditions, are inadequate since they require a) a spotter to guide the shooter on target by observing wind velocity and direction, b) determining the hit point deviation from the aim point if the round results in a miss, c) guessing range to target, and d) the user to undergo intense field training.

Typically for long range shots, it is desirable to profile the downrange wind instead of measuring an average value since wind can change at various points along the range. If the wind is profiled, it could increase the overall measurement time duration; introducing latency in measurements. Therefore the system must be able to optimize the required accuracy in a given measurement period and the number of profiled segments over the engagement range. Clearly, the greater the number of sampling segments, the better the anticipated hit accuracy. Topography, pressure and temperature should therefore be considered in the estimation of the number of profiled wind segments.

Although substantial efforts have been made over the last decade in measuring crosswind, two approaches have been commonly used. These are, namely a) Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and b) Coherent Doppler Lidar. Although these techniques are useful for some applications, they do not seem to be adequate for this application.

Proposers may consider any potential sensor technology, individually or in combination, or other effective sensor modalities which the Proposer considers to be technically superior or more affordable or both. Proposers are reminded that 1) the time urgency of the need argues for mature technologies rather than immature technology requiring many years of development, and 2) end system affordability in production argues against unduly complex and expensive sensor solutions and system architectures.

PROGRAM GOALS:

Phase 1 Goals (Base Program): In Phase 1, the Proposer shall demonstrate the feasibility of the concept for estimating crosswind velocity, direction and range to target by modeling / simulations and validating the hit point accuracy by developing sufficient hardware to conduct field measurements. At the end of Phase 1, the proposed approach must provide answers to the following questions: 1. Does the developed approach measure crosswind?
2. If so, can it measure crosswind to the maximum
effective range of the weapon?
3. What is the measurement accuracy of the proposed
system compared to other errors (weapon, riflescope
magnification, in-line night sight, etc.)?
4. Is down range wind profiling required? How often?
Does one need to measure wind in other directions? If
not, what?s the error?
5. What is the maximum overall measurement time?
Does it meet the CONOPS need?
6. Does the simulated hit point error agree with the field
test data?
7. How accurately does the approach measure range to
target?
8. How does it minimize clutter while ranging target?
9. What is the minimum and maximum offset error at
various ranges and wind conditions?
10. How is the offset error signal presented to the user
(shooter or the spotter)?
Phase 2 Goals (Option 1): In Phase 2, the successful contractor shall package the crosswind measurement and compensation system into a prototype. The Size, Weight, and Power (SWAP) of One-Shot shall commensurate with battlefield operational and environmental requirements and interface with the weapon or spotting scope. The desired system, as a minimum, will include the sensing and display elements that will be fully integrated with a riflescope (desired) or spotter's scope. It is required that different methods and design approaches for integrating the One-Shot sensing and display technologies into the riflescope and/or spotting scope be identified, described and a plan provided to demonstrate manufacturing in volume along with cost matrix for the bill of materials (BOM). The Proposer must provide a concept design approach for packaging the various components culminating in a field deployable crosswind and range measurement system that is rugged, small, and lightweight and can operate for 100 hours on one battery charge.

The contractor must provide the impact of integrating the proposed sensing and display system into the riflescope or the spotter scope on the battlefield concept of operation (CONOPS). Substantial deviations from the current field operational practices are discouraged. Minor changes that improve the efficiency and ultimately the overall performance of the mission should be described. These eventually will be provided as part of the training resources and instruction sets, and will be part of the deliverables for this effort.

AA SECRET facility clearance and a SECRET safeguarding clearance are required to perform as a contractor under this BAA. Organizations that do not have BOTH of these clearances may still perform under this BAA by teaming with an organization that does.
DARPA requests proposals for the full scope of development (e.g., an end-to-end system designed by a team of multidisciplinary research organizations, plus an integrator for coordination and implementation support). Proposals addressing only individual component-level technologies will be considered nonresponsive to this BAA.

This BAA shall remain open for one (1) year from the date of publication on www.fbo.gov (http://www.darpa.mil/leavingdarpa.asp?goto_url=http://www.fbo.gov). Although the Government may select proposals for award at any time during this period, it is anticipated that the majority of funding for this program will be committed during the initial selections. Proposers may submit a full proposal at any time up to the BAA closing date. In order to be considered during the initial round of funding, full proposals must be submitted to DARPA, 3701 North Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203-1714 (Attn.: BAA07-03) on or before 4:00 p.m., local Arlington, VA time, February 5, 2007.

The Government intends to issue awards based on the optimum combination of proposals that offers the best overall value to the Government. The Government reserves the right to award without discussion. The Government reserves the right to select for award all, some, or none of the proposals received in response to this BAA. The Government also reserves the right to select for award some portion(s) of the proposals received; in that event, the Government may select for negotiation all, or portions, of a given proposal. The Government may incrementally fund any award issued under this BAA.

This BAA affords proposers the choice of submitting proposals for the award of a Cooperative Agreement, Contract, Technology Investment Agreement, Other Transaction for Prototype Agreement, or such other appropriate award instrument. The type of procurement or vehicle is subject to negotiation. The government reserves the right to choose the type of contract instrument ultimately awarded.

The Government encourages responses to this BAA by non-traditional defense contractors, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, small businesses, small disadvantaged business concerns, Historically-Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Minority Institutions (MI), large businesses and Government laboratories. Teaming arrangements between and among these groups are encouraged. However, no portion of this BAA will be set aside for organizations of a specific business classification due to the impracticality of preserving discrete or severable areas of research in the technologies sought. Government/National laboratory proposals may be subject to applicable direct competition limitations, though certain Federally Funded Research and Development Centers are excepted per PL 103-337 Section 217 and PL 105-261 Section 3136. Any responsible and otherwise qualified offeror is encouraged to respond.

EVALUATION CRITERIA: The criteria to be used to evaluate and select proposals for this project are described in the following paragraphs. Each proposal will be evaluated on the merit and relevance of the specific proposal as it relates to the program rather than against other proposals for research in the same general area, since no common work statement exists. In descending order of importance, the proposal Evaluation Criteria includes: (a) Technical Approach and Innovations that Best Meet the program objectives; (b) Potential Contribution and Relevance to the DARPA Mission; (c) Program Schedule that Minimizes Development Risks and Offers Mature Technologies Due to the Time Urgency of the Needs; (d) Proposer's Capabilities and Related Experience; (e) Technology Transition Approach and Manufacturing Plan; and (f) Cost Reasonableness and Realism.

In accordance with FAR 35.016(e) the primary basis for selecting proposals for award shall be technical, importance to agency programs, and funds availability. Schedule and cost reasonableness and realism shall also be considered to the extent appropriate as described herein. Proposals may be evaluated as they are received, or they may be collected and periodically reviewed.

NOTE: PROPOSERS ARE CAUTIONED THAT EVALUATION SCORES MAY BE LOWERED AND/OR PROPOSALS REJECTED IF SUBMITTAL INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT FOLLOWED.

SECURITY: The Government anticipates proposals submitted under this BAA will be CLASSIFIED. Guidance regarding the marking, packaging, and delivery of classified proposals is provided in the DD Form 254, Contract Security Classification Specification and Proposers Information Pamphlet (PIP) associated with this BAA. A SECRET facility clearance and a SECRET safeguarding clearance will be required to perform awards issued under this BAA. (Organizations that do not have both of these clearances may still perform under this BAA by teaming with an organization that does if the organization does not receive or generate classified material.)

ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE: Additional details regarding program objectives, development and integration schedule, and milestone criteria are provided in a classified addendum to the associated program BAA. To receive the classified addendum, your organization's CAGE code must list both the facility and safeguarding clearances, as a minimum, at the SECRET level. Proposers are advised to email their Facility Security Officer's (FSO) name, phone number, secure fax number, and classified registry mailing address, and CAGE code to Mark.Doody@darpa.mil as soon as possible, in order to receive the classified addendum in time to prepare their proposal accordingly. The classified addendum will be sent ONLY to each organization's FSO.

NOTE: Do not contact the contracting officer identified below with respect to this announcement. All questions should be sent to BAA07-03@darpa.mil.
Point of Contact:
Patty Matyskiela, Contract Specialist,
Phone xxx-xxx-xxxx, Fax xxx-xxx-xxxx,
Email Patricia.Matyskiela@darpa.mil (Patricia.Matyskiela@darpa.mil)

Lone_Gunman
May 27, 2010, 09:04 PM
This is another example of a great waste of money by the Defense Department.

Sounds pretty neat though.

zorro45
May 27, 2010, 09:16 PM
This is basically the device (imaginary) in the book I,Sniper by Stephen Hunter. It is a programmable scope with rangefinding built in, also various ammunition factors, temperature, R.H.,elevation, etc. and called iSniper
(as in iPhone). I would guess that 3.9Million would be a tiny subsidy to help this project along, rather than an amount that would bring this package into a usable product. I don't want to spoil the book for anyone, but let's just say that the bad guys with the lastest technology don't have a very good day.

lonegunman
May 27, 2010, 10:44 PM
If they would waste a little time and money teaching people to shoot, they would not need a magic rifle scope. The more Playstation losers the world creates the worse it becomes. They are also working on battery powered legs to carry a fat kid with a magic rifle scope out to the battlefield. At some point they want to develope first aid kits that you walk back and fourth over and they cure your gunshot wounds and ammo that sprouts up from the ground when you shoot badguys is only ten years away. That will make reloading a snap.

kmcintosh78
May 28, 2010, 09:06 AM
Been there and done that.
When I was stationed at Hill AFB, Clinton came through. SS had sniper rifles with such a scope already attached.

inclinebench
May 29, 2010, 06:48 AM
LM actually subbed almost all of this work out. Several different technology companies contributed.

danprkr
May 29, 2010, 08:40 AM
The problem is the scope will probably cost tens of thousands $ per copy before it's all said and done.

Initially you're correct, but like all technology it will come down in price, and then Bambi watch out! ;)

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