What's required to change barrels on a 10/22?


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slowr1der
May 28, 2010, 01:12 PM
So I read a post the other day saying you could change 10/22 barrels easily in under 5 minutes. So what do you have to do to change the barrels? Any special tools required? What do you do about head space? Do you need to have head space gauges? Is this something the average shooter can tackle or is it something that's best to let a gunsmith do?

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Carl N. Brown
May 28, 2010, 01:32 PM
Needed: proper size of wrench to fit the bolts that lock the barrel to the receiver. IIRC it is a standard hex or star wrench (Ruger 1022 owners will correct me if I'm wrong.)

Average owners swap out factory barrels for target grade barrels basically by following the instructions that should be packed with the replacement barrel.

NRA handbook on firearms assembly/disassembly states the barrel is not normally removed for routine maintenance, but the directions are simple: the barrel is held in the receiver by a V block with two machine screws. Installing a new barrel is relatively simple.

Uncle Mike
May 28, 2010, 01:40 PM
Any special tools required? Allen wrench of correct size, to remove the V-block.

What do you do about head space? Generally folks don't worry with it, as long as the breech face makes full and complete contact with the barrel with a dummy cartridge inserted into the chamber your good. You can however buy a headspace gauge and check it, this is the correct way to do it.

Do you need to have head space gauges?Yes and no, you do have to make sure the bolt face makes full and complete contact with the back of the barrel with a 22 dummy cartridge in the chamber, or you can use a headspace gauge, the guauge is more accurate and is the best way to do it.

Is this something the average shooter can tackle or is it something that's best to let a gunsmith do? If you have any amount of mechanical aptitude, you'll be able to swap a 10/22 barrel with success!
Remove V-block, pull barrel out of receiver, insert new barrel into receiver, reinstall V-block, check for proper function, your done!

Here is a video of the process...www.wonderhowto.com/how-to-replace-barrel-ruger-10-22-rifle-267104/view/

WardenWolf
May 28, 2010, 03:22 PM
Keep in mind that you'll probably need a new stock as well. The Ruger stock is fitted to their barrel. Unless you want to heavily modify said stock, you will need to buy a new one. This greatly increases the cost of rebarreling a 10/22, and is the main reason I have not done it; I simply cannot justify that cost for a .22 rifle. If I were to do it, however, I would buy one of those laminated skeleton stocks for it. They're extremely comfortable, and designed to fit a heavy bull barrel. They freefloat the barrel, too.

slowr1der
May 28, 2010, 03:37 PM
Yeah I've been looking at stocks. It does greatly increase the cost and I've not found any I really like yet. I'm not sure if I will do it just because of that. I just wanted to see what was required in case I do decide to do it.

TonyAngel
May 28, 2010, 03:47 PM
You don't necessarily need to get a bull barrel either. I have a Green Mountain (I think) with a sporter profile. I was able to fit it to my stock with a minimum of effort. You could do the same with a bull barrel. It just takes more effort.

Red Cent
May 28, 2010, 04:11 PM
It is relatively easy to make the factory stock fit a bull (.920") barrel. The easiest way is to cut the top of the stock off starting about two inches ahead of the receiver.You need the two inches for possible bedding. Ifyou have a router, you can jig it to route the channel. The stock is not hardwood so it is easy to work with.

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/10-22barreladjscrew008.jpg


Next time I will cut the barrel a dollar bill below the barrel.

You have one allen wrench bolt holding the barreled action in the stock. After removing screw, do not use the barrel for leverage. The action needs to be pressured forward and up. Some grab the barrel and you can remove some wood. Simply take hold of the barrel, pressure forward, and lift. May need a jiggle or two. Two allen screws hold the v-block in place clamping the barrel to the receiver. Get an adjustable v-block when you replace the barrel.

Make sure the barrel is fully seated. Slip fit, no threads. Make sure the extractor slot in the barrel allows the extractor to fit without friction. Headspace on a 10-22 is the face of the bolt. The bolt face contacts the "face" of the barrel. Part of the bolt face is recessed and this holds the round while chambering. Factory tolerances are liberal. Makes for reliability but makes for inaccuracy. Most 10-22 'smiths remove the proud metal on the bolt face within thousands of an inch to produce snug headspace. Measure from the recessed face of the bolt to the face of the barrel should be .0425".

After all that, replacing the barrel is easy except for the stock work. Unless you buy a new stock.

Good Luck.

DoubleTapDrew
May 28, 2010, 05:53 PM
If the factory barrel doesn't want to come out after removing the V-block work the action a few times letting it fly home under it's sping pressure. Usually does the trick.
I went with a hogue overmold stock (.920" channel) when I went to a bull barrel, I think it was $65 or so. A dollar bill slipped between the stock and barrel from receiver to the end of the foreend so I didn't need to do any extra work. Just make sure the extractor lines up with the groove for it in the barrel (you'll see when you pull the factory one off) or you'll have FTEs.

Uncle Mike
May 29, 2010, 02:50 AM
For about $45 I think, you can get a stock tool from Brownells and widen the barrel channel of your factory stock to fit a .920 barrel. It is easy to do, and doesn't cost as much as a new stock.

madcratebuilder
May 29, 2010, 05:55 AM
Head space on the 10/22 is controlled by the bolt. If the bolt touches the barrel you have the same head space as the OEM barrel. Most 10/22's have excessive head space, you can face off the end of the bolt to bring it to spec, .048 as I recall. You can open the OEM stock for a bull barrel using a 3/4 socket wrapped in sandpaper. A 1/2 drive deep socket works best.

CZguy
May 29, 2010, 08:28 AM
You can open the OEM stock for a bull barrel using a 3/4 socket wrapped in sandpaper. A 1/2 drive deep socket works best.

Yep, takes awhile, but I've done it.

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