looking for data, 220 grain RN 30/06


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sonier
May 29, 2010, 02:13 PM
I am looking for any data that uses 4320 and a 220 grain roundnose, this is for a 30/06. This is for a bush gun, max yardage would be 150 yards, i have some 150 grain boatails loaded for long range shooting.

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Rokman
May 29, 2010, 02:27 PM
The Sierra manual state 41.7-46.1 grains of IMR 4320. The load that I would probably use comes from the Nosler manual and states 53.0-57.0 grains of RL22 with 220gr. Nosler Partition. I highly recommend these two manuals.

Randy1911
May 29, 2010, 03:33 PM
Look here for all of your loading data.

http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp

IMR 4320 must not be a good choice for a bullet that heavy because they don't list it. I like IMR 4350 which is listed.

sonier
May 29, 2010, 03:36 PM
I loaded some 4320 with 44 grains, from IMR, I can get some 4350 but i am really low and i have 2 pounds of 4320. The load i did functioned FLAWLESLY AND SMOOTH in my remington 740, which is what i wanted this load for :) I had some powder residue on the neck which is showing i may need to beef up the loads somewhat.

sonier
May 29, 2010, 03:49 PM
I beefed the load up too 46 grains, the neck wasnt as sooty, and ejector marks barely show up, im going to back it off about 1/2 a grain and make this my short range load.
Loading 220 grain roundnose in a 30/06 is one interesting load ;)

rcmodel
May 29, 2010, 04:22 PM
This my come as a shock, but 220 RN bullets will do no better shooting through brush then any other bullet weight. It it hits a limb, it is going off on a tangent regardless.

You might be better served using a 165 grain spitzer for all hunting use.
It is the optimum bullet weight for the 30-06, and will perform as well as the 220 in brush.
Also shoot as flat as the 150 at long range.

The advantage to using it for everything is, once sighted in, your are good to go without having to sight in again every time you switch bullet weights back & forth.

rc

sonier
May 29, 2010, 04:40 PM
I have 3 30/06 rifles lol, my savage fires a 150 grain boatail with a medium load of varget.
The reasoning behind this is my remington 740 and interarms HATE any loads below 180 grains. My 740 LOVES this round, there is no footpound difference according to sierra from the 150 gr and 220 grain at max loads, only reason for this was curiosity and twist rates.

Rokman
May 29, 2010, 05:56 PM
The Nosler manual lists 45.0-49.0 IMR4320 for 180gr. bullets and 43.0-47.0 for their 200gr. bullets. Have you tried any of these bullet weights with the IMR4320? I have used 46.0-49.0 grains of IMR4320 with the 168gr. Nosler Btip, but with just fair accuracy and velocity. My 30-06 shoots 150gr. Nosler Btips in a phenominal group at 100 yards with 50.5 grains of Varget.

sonier
May 29, 2010, 06:07 PM
MY savage will put a 5 group under 3/4 of an inch at 100 yards. i havnt tryed any 200 grain, but the guy had some 220 grains so i picked those up. i love the recoil they pack a stout kick too :)

GooseGestapo
May 30, 2010, 11:23 PM
The 220's in the '06 are serious medicine. The SD is higher than that of the 6.5mm 160gr bullets. (.331 vs .328) For the most part, the 220's are toughly constructed and won't give any benifit on game under 500lbs. On deer with typical shots, they'll not expand sufficiently and act like FMJ's. One exception is the Nosler Partition. The nose section of the Nosler will expand readily. But, for this reason, it seldom penetrates anymore than the 180's. It will make a mess of a deer on a length-wise shot, however...

My MkX Mauser shot up a bunch of Norma 220's back in the mid '70s because I bought them at a hardware store going out of business still have an empty box with a $3.00 sticker on it. I would bet aquaintances that my '06 kicked more than their 7mm Magnums. I'd then let them touch off one of those Norma's in that '06 w/o a recoil pad. None wanted to shoot it a second time. I learned what a Weatherby eye was from the Leupold scope I had on it too....... And danged, if they werent accurate too ! Never shot a deer with one, though.....

If I was loading 220's, I'd want to run them about 2,400fps to get decent accuracy, but less than the near 2,600fps they're capable of being run to limit the recoil... I'm not recoil shy, (I've got a .300RUM, too) but, I don't like getting unecessarily beat up either.

stinger 327
May 31, 2010, 02:53 AM
The 220's in the '06 are serious medicine. The SD is higher than that of the 6.5mm 160gr bullets. (.331 vs .328) For the most part, the 220's are toughly constructed and won't give any benifit on game under 500lbs. On deer with typical shots, they'll not expand sufficiently and act like FMJ's. One exception is the Nosler Partition. The nose section of the Nosler will expand readily. But, for this reason, it seldom penetrates anymore than the 180's. It will make a mess of a deer on a length-wise shot, however...

My MkX Mauser shot up a bunch of Norma 220's back in the mid '70s because I bought them at a hardware store going out of business still have an empty box with a $3.00 sticker on it. I would bet aquaintances that my '06 kicked more than their 7mm Magnums. I'd then let them touch off one of those Norma's in that '06 w/o a recoil pad. None wanted to shoot it a second time. I learned what a Weatherby eye was from the Leupold scope I had on it too....... And danged, if they werent accurate too ! Never shot a deer with one, though.....

If I was loading 220's, I'd want to run them about 2,400fps to get decent accuracy, but less than the near 2,600fps they're capable of being run to limit the recoil... I'm not recoil shy, (I've got a .300RUM, too) but, I don't like getting unecessarily beat up either.
I bought 30.06 factory Remington loads Core-Lok 125,150, 165, 180 and 220 grains. I have shot all of these and cannot tell the difference in recoil.
So for all around use and to get the best accuracy is the 165 grain the best 30.06 to shoot?

stinger 327
May 31, 2010, 03:03 AM
The 220's in the '06 are serious medicine. The SD is higher than that of the 6.5mm 160gr bullets. (.331 vs .328) For the most part, the 220's are toughly constructed and won't give any benifit on game under 500lbs. On deer with typical shots, they'll not expand sufficiently and act like FMJ's. One exception is the Nosler Partition. The nose section of the Nosler will expand readily. But, for this reason, it seldom penetrates anymore than the 180's. It will make a mess of a deer on a length-wise shot, however...

My MkX Mauser shot up a bunch of Norma 220's back in the mid '70s because I bought them at a hardware store going out of business still have an empty box with a $3.00 sticker on it. I would bet aquaintances that my '06 kicked more than their 7mm Magnums. I'd then let them touch off one of those Norma's in that '06 w/o a recoil pad. None wanted to shoot it a second time. I learned what a Weatherby eye was from the Leupold scope I had on it too....... And danged, if they werent accurate too ! Never shot a deer with one, though.....

If I was loading 220's, I'd want to run them about 2,400fps to get decent accuracy, but less than the near 2,600fps they're capable of being run to limit the recoil... I'm not recoil shy, (I've got a .300RUM, too) but, I don't like getting unecessarily beat up either.
I bought 30.06 factory Remington loads Core-Lok 125, 150, 165, 180 and 220 grains. I have shot all of these and cannot tell the difference in recoil. They all kick like hell.
So for all around use and to get the best accuracy which one is the best, Is it the 165 grain the best 30.06 to shoot?
Or stick with the big 220 grain?

sonier
June 1, 2010, 01:04 PM
depends on rifling twist rates, i have different twist rates in my savage, its calls for 165 grain and lower for accuracy, my interarms and 740 love 165 and up for accuracy. the factory laods have same recoil due to less powder for the 220 when you handload you can beef that 220 up few grains and kill your shoulder in no time.

stinger 327
June 1, 2010, 03:37 PM
depends on rifling twist rates, i have different twist rates in my savage, its calls for 165 grain and lower for accuracy, my interarms and 740 love 165 and up for accuracy. the factory laods have same recoil due to less powder for the 220 when you handload you can beef that 220 up few grains and kill your shoulder in no time.
That's ok I don't want to beef up anything that will kill the shoulder even more. I thought the 125 grain 30.06 Remington Core-Lok would have the least amount of recoil but I tried them all and they are all the same.
This is in a Beretta Tikki 3 Light so if I can't feel any differences why not just use the 220 grainers instead of the lighter ones like 165 grains?

sonier
June 1, 2010, 04:21 PM
it depends on application, im going to run a ballistics to give a general idea of trajectory, but im theorising that the 220 grain will have a trajectory similiar to the 30/30, which is ok if you are using the rifle for a bush gun.

sonier
June 1, 2010, 04:28 PM
alright sighted in at 100 yards the 220 grain drops 23 inches at 300 yards and 52 inches at 400 yards. this is a sierra 220 grain at 2300 fps

the 150 grain drops 13 inches at 300 yards and 30 inches at 400 yards sighted in at 100 yards and 2900 fps

for short ranges the 220 would pack a massive punch but for long range pronghorn or mule deer shooting id use a 150 or 125 grain ballistic tipped boat tail.

stinger 327
June 1, 2010, 04:28 PM
it depends on application, im going to run a ballistics to give a general idea of trajectory, but im theorising that the 220 grain will have a trajectory similiar to the 30/30, which is ok if you are using the rifle for a bush gun.
What would be the most accurrate between the 125, 150, 165, 180 and 220 grain Rem. Core Loks?
Is one going to be more ideal than the other i.e heavier vs. lighter, faster vs. slower? round?

stinger 327
June 1, 2010, 05:11 PM
alright sighted in at 100 yards the 220 grain drops 23 inches at 300 yards and 52 inches at 400 yards. this is a sierra 220 grain at 2300 fps

the 150 grain drops 13 inches at 300 yards and 30 inches at 400 yards sighted in at 100 yards and 2900 fps

for short ranges the 220 would pack a massive punch but for long range pronghorn or mule deer shooting id use a 150 or 125 grain ballistic tipped boat tail.
So if you aren't going to shoot further than 100 yards the 220 grain 30.06 bullet will be the most damaging over the lighter loads. Accuracy won't be affected as long as it's sighted in correctly.

sonier
June 1, 2010, 05:30 PM
accuracy would be effected, 30/06 rifling varies some have 1in10 twist others can have a 1in12 twist, the twist effects accuracy different weights prefer different twists to stabilize the bullet in flight better. 220 grain bullets prefer a slower twist such as 1 in 10 but 125 grains and 150 grains prefer faster twist rates such as 1 in 12. Even this is what benchrest guys do to gain an edge of accuracy, and in truth the difference in using a 220 grain bullet with wrong twist rate wont be noticed because you wont be shooting over 300 yards ideally.

stinger 327
June 1, 2010, 05:32 PM
accuracy would be effected, 30/06 rifling varies some have 1in10 twist others can have a 1in12 twist, the twist effects accuracy different weights prefer different twists to stabilize the bullet in flight better. 220 grain bullets prefer a slower twist such as 1 in 10 but 125 grains and 150 grains prefer faster twist rates such as 1 in 12. Even this is what benchrest guys do to gain an edge of accuracy, and in truth the difference in using a 220 grain bullet with wrong twist rate wont be noticed because you wont be shooting over 300 yards ideally.
I'm not sure what the twist rate is on a Baretta Tikka 3 Light 30.06 rifle.

sonier
June 1, 2010, 05:43 PM
look it up on google my PDF is not working on this computer so i can not view the twist rates but it appears your rifle may be a 1in11 which would prefer medium weight bullets

Cosmoline
June 1, 2010, 06:05 PM
I like IMR 4350 which is listed.

Double ditto that! IMR 4350 is my go-to powder for these big bullets. I've had good results in 7.65 Argie and 7.62x54R. I'll bet it works good for the .30'06 as well.

For bullet choices, Woodleigh is my strong suggestion. GooseGestapo is correct that most of these heavies are for the magnums, but Woodleighs are different and their 220 .308" is designed to expand at under 2400 fps impact.

sonier
June 1, 2010, 06:24 PM
woodleighs sounds liek that expansion would be a little etchy, wouldnt want to stake my life on the 220 grain at 2300-2400 fps. It was more of curiosity for big game hunting id go with 200 grain with a bit more velocity.

stinger 327
June 2, 2010, 12:38 AM
look it up on google my PDF is not working on this computer so i can not view the twist rates but it appears your rifle may be a 1in11 which would prefer medium weight bullets
Would that be medium weight like 165 grains or 180 grains?
I thought 220 grains would have more knock down power as it would be for the larger sized game.
I haven't seen any 200 grain 30.06 bullets for sale. I use factory ammo and don't handload.

stinger 327
June 2, 2010, 01:09 AM
look it up on google my PDF is not working on this computer so i can not view the twist rates but it appears your rifle may be a 1in11 which would prefer medium weight bullets
• Rates of Twist: 8”, 9.5”, 10”, 11”, and 14”

sonier
June 2, 2010, 03:22 PM
you need to find your rate of twist, thats a separate thread on its own, theres techniques used to find your twist. 8 would be for heaviest bullets and 14 would be for the lightest bullets.

stinger 327
June 2, 2010, 06:00 PM
you need to find your rate of twist, thats a separate thread on its own, theres techniques used to find your twist. 8 would be for heaviest bullets and 14 would be for the lightest bullets.
Thanks I'll have to research this further to find out.

Cosmoline
June 2, 2010, 06:08 PM
wouldnt want to stake my life on the 220 grain at 2300-2400 fps.

With those bullets, you don't need to worry. They're like little crossbow bolts and have taken the largest critters in Africa. Out of the .303 the long Woodleighs are legendary for killing power. You do not need super high velocity.

sonier
June 2, 2010, 06:13 PM
ok ive seen the prices those arnt cheap bullets lol

stinger 327
June 4, 2010, 12:39 AM
ok ive seen the prices those arnt cheap bullets lol
The Remington 30.06 Core-Lok 220 grain bullets cost around 21.00 for 20. Not bad The 165 and 150 are just a tad less.

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