44 mag hot load with 429421 and 2400


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Shudawg46
May 29, 2010, 04:18 PM
I have some 200 rds of 'hot' loads comprised of 20.0 g of 2400 behind a lyman 429244 w/gascheck hard cast at 265 g. I always used magnum primers years ago so these are primed with CCI 350 primers. I once shot IHMSA steel targets with my 10" Dan Wesson and wondered if this load is now considered too heavy because of the primer? The books today state no magnum primer with 2400 powder. Anyone attempted such? Thanks for your advice!

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rcmodel
May 29, 2010, 04:43 PM
I think you are still probably within acceptable limits.
My only concern is, Lyman 429421 is normally not a gas check bullet design.
You sure it isn't Lyman 429244, which is a GC 255 grain?

Lyman #49 lists 20.6 grains as max with 429421 as cast in Linotype, and 22.2 max with the 429244 GC bullet.
The 2002 Alliant powder guide also lists 20.6 max with a 240 LGC

I doubt mag primers would account for another 0.6 to 2.2 grains powder.

The current thinking is Mag primers give a higher SD and possibly less accuracy with 2400 powder.

rc

blackwalnut
May 29, 2010, 04:52 PM
I looked up some older data 15-20 years and compared it to newer data and it seems that too me its on the border of being "hot" . I shoot a non gas checked 265 National Bullet (flatnose) with 19 of 2400 and a standard primer.
I encounter no problems in a 629. Are these older loads that you had or are they new with newer 2400 Powder? If you use old components and old recipes that were tested by labs and considered safe I would say no problem.
If its anything else or if you are in doubt and that doubt is troubling (which it seems) than I would err on the side of caution and get out the bullet puller. In fact as I write this I would recommend pulling the bullets and start again using data that recommends mag primers. Good Luck. Be safe.

P.S. Call me a wimp or whatever but I just dont like playing on the edge WHEN I DONT HAVE TO in life. Reloading is for fun and there are
too many other things out there than can blind you or injure you. Why push it? And I know others load hot and some persons drink
and drive too or text and drive. there you have my thoughts when in doubt.

buck460XVR
May 30, 2010, 02:07 PM
P.S. Call me a wimp or whatever but I just dont like playing on the edge WHEN I DONT HAVE TO in life. Reloading is for fun and there are
too many other things out there than can blind you or injure you. Why push it?


I tend to agree. Why beat up yourself and your gun, just because you can? Other folk's experience may be different, but I have yet to find a handgun that shoots most accurately with at or above max loads. To me the loss in accuracy outweighs the minimal gain in velocity/energy. This is especially true for me in .44 mag using 2400 and heavier bullets. I've found H110/W296 will give me better accuracy at higher velocities than 2400. That said, I believe RC is correct and the OP would be safe in shooting the rounds and seeing how they perform.

Shudawg46
May 30, 2010, 10:23 PM
I appreciate your replies. The loads are over 15 years old. I don't remember any notes in any of my manuals then about not using magnum primers. I regularly shoot 23g of H110 with a Hornady 240 JHP in my DW 44 with no pressure signs what so ever. Quite accute as well. I sold all my equipment to move to the Atlanta area (retired) and I remember putting these together rather fast. My DW throats are all .430, the slugs are gas check (I may very well have the wrong mold number) sized to .430 to match the bore and they definitely weigh 265g. It sounds as though the better part of valor is indeed to pull them and start over. Thanks for your discussion.

GooseGestapo
May 30, 2010, 11:55 PM
They're probably not as hot as you think. The DW's are stout guns, so I don't think you'll hurt anything.

I shot a lot of Keith style #429421's back in the late '70's through a M29 over 22.0-23.0gr of #2400. Didn't hurt me or the gun. Although, todays #2400 is said to be a bit faster burning, all the old data I've tried comes up pretty close to what I saw 30yrs ago. Then again, it's mostly been through rifles with cast bullets and a Ruger Redhawk in .45Colt.

Only thing is, the gun I've got now is a 329PD. With any of the "old" loads, it'll just walk the bullets out the front of the cylinder and tie up everything till the bullets are punched back into the cylinders. S&W found an interesting way to make me back down the .44 loads....... Even with the bullets crimped as much as I can without distorting the bullets, the full power loads will just walk out of the cylinders in 3 or 4 shots. Only solution is to only load 2 rounds in the gun at a time till I shot them all up. (lubed with SPG, so pulled bullets and powder are a gummy mess....)

It took only a few of the 255gr Keiths over 22.0gr of H110 (w/CCI#350's) to make me realize that I'm too old, and the arthritis too bad in my thumbs to shoot any more of those. 5.9gr of Clays and a 200gr RFN is just enough now , thankyou !!! I'll leave the #2400 for "heavier" guns.....

GP100man
May 31, 2010, 11:29 AM
I shoot 3 loads in my Redhawks & all do well ,but the 7 1/2 " Hunter will digest & stack em very close , the load is a plain based 429421 with 20 gr. 2400 & WLP primers .

buck460XVR
May 31, 2010, 12:28 PM
I regularly shoot 23g of H110 with a Hornady 240 JHP in my DW 44 with no pressure signs what so ever.

This too is my standard load in my M629 and 77/44 carbine. Accurate and not abusive to either me or the guns. I've found that some of the other bulk bullets available will shoot just as well as the Hornadys, but cost less. YEMV

I bump this load up to 23.5 grains for hunting loads without any sacrifice in accuracy.

CraigC
May 31, 2010, 01:13 PM
I use standard primers only for 2400. If it's good enough for Elmer Keith and John Taffin, it's good enough for me.

lvl1trauma
May 31, 2010, 02:21 PM
18 Gr. of 2400 with that bullet is perfect for me. The end result on game or target is the same whether you use more 2400 or not.

GaryL
June 1, 2010, 09:26 PM
... Why beat up yourself and your gun, just because you can? Other folk's experience may be different, but I have yet to find a handgun that shoots most accurately with at or above max loads. To me the loss in accuracy outweighs the minimal gain in velocity/energy. ...I've found H110/W296 will give me better accuracy at higher velocities than 2400.... Same here. H110 works well for full power loads. Besides, there is always another more potent caliber handgun to move up to. At least until you get to this one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lzri8dn7p0&feature=related

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