Glock Slide-Stop is hard to work.


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bg226
June 1, 2010, 06:13 PM
I find the slide stop on a new G19 exceptionally hard, an absolute PITA to shut the slide with. I know that you're supposed to slingshot, but I find that closing the slide via the slide-stop requires just too much strength.

Anyone else experience this?

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pikid89
June 1, 2010, 06:23 PM
yes but just get a factory extended slide release........ eliminates said problem and is allowed in things like IDPA

1KPerDay
June 1, 2010, 06:45 PM
Are you doing this with an empty mag in the gun?

beeenbag
June 1, 2010, 06:49 PM
Mine is too... I just think it is because its so close to the frame of the gun you cant get much on it.... just follow pikid89's advice if it is a big problem for you.

JDGray
June 1, 2010, 06:50 PM
Your closing on a full mag, right? I never had an issue with any Glock slide stop dropping hard, but if your trying on an empty mag.........:scrutiny:

Nothing wrong with either way of closing the slide, use what works for you.

gofastman
June 1, 2010, 07:07 PM
put an itty-bitty dab of EP grease on the slide where it contacts the stop, oh and get an extended slide stop ;)

bg226
June 1, 2010, 07:13 PM
Pardon my ignorance, what is wrong with doing it on an empty-mag because that is how I am experimenting with it.

REAPER4206969
June 1, 2010, 07:24 PM
Pardon my ignorance, what is wrong with doing it on an empty-mag because that is how I am experimenting with it.

You're pushing against the magazine spring. That's why it's hard.

HGUNHNTR
June 1, 2010, 07:28 PM
This style lever was never intended to be a slide release, just a slide stop. For a positive return to battery always grab the slide with your hand and let it slam home. When your adrenaline is pumping your fine motor skills are dulled, use your whole hand.

The Lone Haranguer
June 1, 2010, 07:47 PM
I know that you're supposed to slingshot, but I find that closing the slide via the slide-stop requires just too much strength.

Is this with a loaded magazine - or no magazine - in the gun? I've never had any trouble with mine. If you are trying to do this with an empty magazine, this will not work and is not how the gun is supposed to function.

cocojo
June 1, 2010, 07:51 PM
Because it's a slide stop not a slide release. Glock recommends you rack the slide. They don't recommend you use that as a slide release.

David E
June 1, 2010, 08:25 PM
They don't recommend loading it until JUST BEFORE SHOOTING, either. :rolleyes:

I install the slide stop/slide lock/slide release/slide release-stop doo-hickey that is the extended type they put on the G-34 and G-35

(Gee, did they "intend" for you to be able to drop the slide via the slide stop on only THOSE two models?)

REAPER4206969
June 1, 2010, 08:42 PM
Gee, did they "intend" for you to be able to drop the slide via the slide stop on only THOSE two models?
Glock is a business. They offer the extended slide stop lever because people will buy it. Using the slide stop is poor technique.

AKElroy
June 1, 2010, 08:52 PM
Glock is a business. They offer the extended slide stop lever because people will buy it. Using the slide stop is poor technique.

It may not be how you were trained, but that does not mean it is poor technique. With the OEM button, it is poor technique. With the extended button I am as fast & reliable as slingshotting into battery.

Shawn Dodson
June 1, 2010, 08:52 PM
I use an overhand grasp, as opposed to a slingshot grip, to operate the slide on my G19.

To acquire an overhand grasp, with the muzzle pointed downrange and the gun in a "compressed ready" mount* bring your support hand over the top of the slide, with your thumb pointing toward you. Position your support hand so that either the fingers or heel of the palm are/is located behind the ejection port and firmly clamp the slide between your palm and fingers. Operate the slide with vigor by simultaneously retracting the slide with the support hand and pushing forward with the firing hand. It should feel like you're trying to rip the slide off the frame. When the slide reaches its rearmost travel and stops your support hand will simply slip off the slide and and the slide will be propelled into battery by the recoil spring.

While operating the slide in this manner I also simultaneously roll the pistol to the right to point the ejection port at the ground to allow centrifugal force and gravity to clear the action, just as I do to clear stoppages (tap, roll & rack). I ALWAYS roll & rack when I operate the slide to exercise the movements I have to make to clear a stoppage. I use it as a training opportunity to exercise my skills.

*To acquire a compressed ready mount, start with the pistol in an isosceles or Weaver mount and then bend your elbows straight down so the gun comes back toward you until your upper arms are against your chest. Keep the gun in your line of vision as you "compress" your mount. This keeps the gun in your visual plane while you manipulate it. If you need to take a quick glance at it while performing your manipulations your eyes don't have to move as far off target, whereas if you bring the gun down to waist level your eyes not only have farther to move but you also can't see the target with your peripheral vision. In addition, when you keep your head up so you can maintain visual awareness of the target's activity downrange it decreases the chances that you'll become sucked in and preoccupied with your "internal" problem and lose "external" awareness in case you need to react to a changing situation.

Good luck!

GLOOB
June 2, 2010, 12:59 AM
Anyone who wants to drop the slide on a GLOCK with the slide-stop lever should do it.

GLOCK's stance is most likely a CYA, financially motivated statement. I doubt Gaston cares enough about the end-users' fine motor coordination under stress or IPSA reloading times to actually add his 2 cents either way, if it were not for the simple fact that the notch can and will wear out under repeated use and GLOCK does not consider that a warranty issue.

Weevil
June 2, 2010, 01:27 AM
Anyone who wants to drop the slide on a GLOCK with the slide-stop lever should do it.

GLOCK's stance is most likely a CYA, financially motivated statement. I doubt Gaston cares enough about the end-users' fine motor coordination under stress or IPSA reloading times to actually add his 2 cents either way, if it were not for the simple fact that the notch can and will wear out under repeated use and GLOCK does not consider that a warranty issue.





Using the slide stop lever to release the slide will cause wear to the notch and lever on ALL pistols not just Glocks.


You're scraping metal against metal under tension from the recoil spring, this will cause rounding of the slide notch and the lever.

It's a bad idea no matter how you look at it or what brand of pistol you use.


What companies do consider this a warranty issue???

David E
June 2, 2010, 02:12 AM
Using the slide stop is poor technique.

Says who?

Those that dismiss it usually cite the "loss of coordination" as the reason. They seem to forget that you just hit a small magazine release and did a reload, but suddenly, just before you're going to release the slide stop, you lose the coordination required to do so?

It allows a faster, accurate shot than sling-shotting (poor technique 99% of the time) or overhand. (which is a technique worth knowing and learning, in case you have to do a battlefield pickup with a Walter PPK that has the slide locked back.....)

David E
June 2, 2010, 02:14 AM
Using the slide stop lever to release the slide will cause wear to the notch and lever on ALL pistols not just Glocks.

So?

Do you know how many 10's of 1000's of reps you're going to have to do to make that a valid concern? A BUNCH.

And if I do "wear it out," it's easily fixed.

9mmepiphany
June 2, 2010, 02:19 AM
Gaston Glock researched what worked on successful guns and how they should be properly operated, his research lead to the design of the G17.

the Glock was not originally designed to release the slide with the slide lock. this lead to problems when under/improperly trained users insisted on releasing their slides in that manner and caused failures of the slide stop to hold the slide back on an empty mag...that area of the slide wasn't hardened to resist the scraping of the slide stop being forced downward against the recoil spring pressure.

Glock hardened that area and offered an extended slide stop because the market demanded it, not because it was needed....much like the full-length guide rod on the 1911

9mmepiphany
June 2, 2010, 02:23 AM
Pardon my ignorance, what is wrong with doing it on an empty-mag because that is how I am experimenting with it.

why would you release a slide on an empty mag and not expect the additional upward pressure of the mag spring to make the operation harder?

bg226
June 2, 2010, 10:53 AM
Okay, my next question:

Does using the slide-stop to close the slide damage anything on the Glock?

lions
June 2, 2010, 12:05 PM
Does using the slide-stop to close the slide damage anything on the Glock?

Answers:
if it were not for the simple fact that the notch can and will wear out under repeated use and GLOCK does not consider that a warranty issue.
Using the slide stop lever to release the slide will cause wear to the notch and lever on ALL pistols not just Glocks.
the Glock was not originally designed to release the slide with the slide lock. this lead to problems when under/improperly trained users insisted on releasing their slides in that manner and caused failures of the slide stop to hold the slide back on an empty mag

Umm, I'd say it is possible.

Weevil
June 2, 2010, 01:17 PM
So?

Do you know how many 10's of 1000's of reps you're going to have to do to make that a valid concern? A BUNCH.

And if I do "wear it out," it's easily fixed.


So???

Sew buttons! ;)


No Dave it doesn't take "10s of 1000s of reps".

If it did you wouldn't see so many posts about slides not locking back after the last round or slamming shut when a mag is inserted or them expecting Glock and other companies to warranty the wear they have caused to their pistols.

A lot of people must be doing this a "BUNCH".


And if you don't do it you won't need to fix it easy fix or not.

If you feel the need to do it then fine but don't kid yourself that it's not gonna cause unnecessary wear and tear to your pistol.

David E
June 2, 2010, 02:01 PM
All they have to do is either dress the engagement surface of the slide stop or replace it with a new one.

See? Easy.

As far as slamming shut upon inserting the mag, my M&P Pro does that.....and it's new!


And the fact remains that following a reload, it is the fastest way to get that first shot fired on target.

bg226
June 2, 2010, 02:04 PM
I only used the slide-stop to close the slide a few times, I hope I didn't screw anything up. I won't do it anymore. Thanks for the tips.

bds
June 2, 2010, 02:30 PM
Does using the slide-stop to close the slide damage anything on the Glock?

I only used the slide-stop to close the slide a few times, I hope I didn't screw anything up. I won't do it anymore.
You won't damage or screw up releasing Glock slides using the slide lock.

I'll just speak from personal experience. I have been releasing Glock slides using the slide lock for the past 15+ years and will continue to do the same.

Especially on a newer Glock, stiff recoil spring tension against the slide and the slide lock is very firm and requires a "deliberate" arcing/sweeping motion of the thumb to release the slide . If you start above the slide lock on the slide and slide down as if you are scratching the slide lock off the frame, it helps but some can be a PITA.

If you still can't actuate the slide lock, there's always the extended slide lock option. I haven't met anyone who couldn't actuate the extended lever.

Ben86
June 2, 2010, 03:13 PM
I've never had a problem with it, but I have especially manly digits. :)

Put the above mentioned factory extended release on it and I bet it will help. According to them what comes on the gun is considered a slide stop not a slide release, meaning it wasn't so much designed to be used as a slide release.

Weevil
June 2, 2010, 04:28 PM
All they have to do is either dress the engagement surface of the slide stop or replace it with a new one.

See? Easy.




Yes Dave I had a Tokarev I had to file a new notch on so I'm aware of the procedure for fixing the damage.


However, "easy" or not you are obviously aware that this can cause wear and damage to a pistol or you wouldn't know the fix for it now would you???

Shawn Dodson
June 2, 2010, 08:04 PM
And the fact remains that following a reload, it is the fastest way to get that first shot fired on target. Unless your slide unexpectedly goes into battery and you hesitate while you decide what to do next - drive-on or release the slide lock - provided you detected that the slide went into battery.

Whereas if you don't detect that your slide went into battery when you seated the magazine, your recovery time may increase as you sense that there's a difference in the feel of the slide lock when you attempt to release it, and you pause to figure out what's going on.

Releasing the slide lock increases the number of decisions you have to make under stress, whereas retracting and releasing the slide whenever you load, clear stoppages and perform a combat reload is a common movement to perform all these tasks. It doesn't matter if the slide goes into battery when the magazine is seated - you simply seat, roll & rack and drive-on, as a conditioned reflex with no additional decision-making to accomplish.

Weevil
June 3, 2010, 01:12 AM
Unless your slide unexpectedly goes into battery and you hesitate while you decide what to do next - drive-on or release the slide lock - provided you detected that the slide went into battery.

Whereas if you don't detect that your slide went into battery when you seated the magazine, your recovery time may increase as you sense that there's a difference in the feel of the slide lock when you attempt to release it, and you pause to figure out what's going on.

Releasing the slide lock increases the number of decisions you have to make under stress, whereas retracting and releasing the slide whenever you load, clear stoppages and perform a combat reload is a common movement to perform all these tasks. It doesn't matter if the slide goes into battery when the magazine is seated - you simply seat, roll & rack and drive-on, as a conditioned reflex with no additional decision-making to accomplish.




That is an interesting point to consider, especially after how he mentioned his brand new M&P Pro "slams shut when a mag is inserted".


Definitely something to think about.

David E
June 3, 2010, 01:20 AM
I bet your "Tok" wasn't heat treated like current Glox are.

I've used the slide release on 1911's since the late 70's.........10's of 1000's of rounds later, still no problems.....:)

One of the things I teach my students is to detect the difference in feel when the slide locks back. It feels different than when the slide goes forward. Subtle, yet distinct. Once learned, the shooter knows immediately his slide is locked back. He can begin his reload while the gun is still in recoil from the last shot, not skipping a beat.

(now the slide going forward on an empty chamber, THAT is subtle and much less distinct.......but there is a detectable difference.)

If the slide goes forward upon seating the mag, the shooter is immediately aware of it. He can rack the slide, too.

Weevil
June 3, 2010, 01:27 AM
I dunno personally if I have a gun that "slams shut when mag is inserted" I think there's a problem with the slide stop.

I always used the slide stop as a release too but after the Tok incident it got me to thinking and nowadays I really don't see any need to put that kind of unnecessary wear and tear on my pistols.


To each his own, they're your guns.

Bill_G
June 3, 2010, 03:25 AM
Mine works perfectly. it always automatically leaves it open on last shot.

thats why they call it a slide STOP....not slide release. :)

easyg
June 3, 2010, 10:32 AM
I've never had any problem with mine.

David E
June 3, 2010, 03:15 PM
I always used the slide stop as a release too (with the Tok) nowadays I really don't see any need to put that kind of unnecessary wear and tear on my pistols.

I daresay that the "wear" was a result of the gun working as designed, when the slide stop caught the slide after the last shot. NOT when you used the lever to release the slide.

Greg528iT
June 3, 2010, 03:26 PM
I'll have to agree with David E. The wear and tear of the slide slamming into the slide stop after the last round went off, is going to be FAR greater than slipping the slide stop down to release the slide. Granted, one is a sliding action (pardon the pun) and one if a direct hit or hammer. and granted it's only hammering fwd a fraction of an inch, the hardness I would want in the slide to resist denting / maring the catch face is going to be plenty hard to resist a sliding wear of the slide stop.

Weevil
June 3, 2010, 03:38 PM
I daresay that the "wear" was a result of the gun working as designed, when the slide stop caught the slide after the last shot. NOT when you used the lever to release the slide.


Why's that???

The slide stop lever is pushed up by the mag spring and follower and into the notch as the slide passes to the rear, then the flat of the notch catches the flat of the lever. When a full mag is inserted and the slide pulled back the lever drops down out of the way.

How is that going to cause the corner of the notch or the lever to become rounded off???

I would think that dragging the lever down against the slide while it's under tension from the recoil spring is much more likely to cause wear and round off the corners. You've got metal rubbing against metal and the surfaces dragging across each other while under tension from a large heavy spring. This is going to cause sharp corners to wear off as these are the last point of contact and the weakest area of the surfaces.

If you don't use the slide stop as a release these parts do not drag against each other and only contact each other on the flat surfaces when the notch catches the lever. This is a straight hit with no dragging that would round off the corners.

ForumSurfer
June 3, 2010, 03:45 PM
Another "do or don't use the slide stop thread." Awesome.

Do as others suggested, buy a glock extended slide release/stop/whatchamadoodle.

For all the glock guys, what about this? I find that if I slam in the fresh, loaded magazine hard, the slide closes automatically for me. Seems to only work if my index finger isn't pressed tightly against the frame, just ever so slightly lifted off the frame above the trigger.(My legal disclaimer:: Don't try this if you're reading this post unless you are using snap caps.) Does that cause undue wear and tear on my indestructible glock?

David E
June 3, 2010, 09:30 PM
How is that going to cause the corner of the notch or the lever to become rounded off???

Greg528iT, who posted above yours, explained it pretty well.

There's no guarantee that the flat of the slide stop will be fully raised to properly engage the flat of the slide stop cut.

It's that whole physics objects-in-motion-coming-to-sudden-stop kinda thing.

GLOOB
June 3, 2010, 09:47 PM
A lot of people advocate oversize/extended slide releases. As long as they're in a spot where they'll never be accidentally engaged, they should be great.

Some people (like me) have issue with oversized/extended slide releases because they have accidentally pushed up on one while shooting.

Personally, I want the slide release to be slightly out of reach of my shooting thumb, so I have to shift grip when I want to use it. I also want it to be small and unobtrusive, so that my off thumb will also have little chance of accidentally pushing it up during firing. Ideally, it should be flat and snag-free.

A device that makes your reloads 0.1 second faster but can cause your gun to stop firing mid-stride is not a good trade-off.

This is all just my opinion, and note I do not have anything against using a slide release, if it's reachable. I'd just rather it not be reachable in the first place. I.e. - none of my guns have a slide release that is positively reachable without breaking my shooting grip, and reacquiring grip probably takes longer than the time I'd save. Even if I save time, there's no guarantee I don't fudge my grip in the process. But when I have shot my friend's Bersa, I found myself using the large and easy to reach slide release without even thinking about it.

David E
June 3, 2010, 10:32 PM
For a right handed shooter, proper technique has you using your LEFT thumb to activate the slide release, not the gun-hand thumb.

I agree, if it's too big and causes you to engage it before the gun is dry, trim it down or replace it with one that won't.

Weevil
June 3, 2010, 11:50 PM
I'll have to agree with David E. The wear and tear of the slide slamming into the slide stop after the last round went off, is going to be FAR greater than slipping the slide stop down to release the slide. Granted, one is a sliding action (pardon the pun) and one if a direct hit or hammer. and granted it's only hammering fwd a fraction of an inch, the hardness I would want in the slide to resist denting / maring the catch face is going to be plenty hard to resist a sliding wear of the slide stop.


Sorry but I didn't see your post until Dave mentioned it.



The slamming action isn't going to create wear, mushrooming perhaps, but not rounding.

The hammering of a flat piece of metal aganst another flat piece of metal isn't going to cause the rounding off of corners or change the angle of the metal. Plus you have the all the metal behind it to help absorb the impact. Good steel is slightly elastic and will bounce back from an impact, steel can be bent or hammered to a slight extent without being permanently deformed. If not the hammer would destroy the rear of the slide.

Denting or maring hardened steel by striking it with another flat piece of steel of roughly the same hardness, is not an easy thing to do.


However if you want to change the shape of a piece of steel slightly what's the best method?


To grind it down or file it with another piece of hard steel. It's the same way a drill bit makes a hole in a piece of steel.

The file and the drill bit have sharp edges or [I]corners[I] that cut away small slivers of metal from the surface.

When you pull down on the slide stop the angle is going to change as the slide stop moves down, this will bring the top corner of the slide stop raking down the notch of your slide and finally shearing off the bottom corner of the notch as they seperate.

Perhaps only a wee bit but each time you do it there goes a little bit more steel.

Now you might think that the top corner of the slide stop would eventually round off too, but as we have already discussed the slide will hammer against the slide stop after the last round flattening it back out. So now you have a nice fresh sharp corner to drag back across the notch in the slide.

As the metal of the slide is slowly but surely ground away the angle will become more shallow until eventually the slide will not always catch and hold after the last round or will jump loose from the impact of inserting a mag.



Don't believe me?


Take one of your pistols and lock the slide back and then slowly release it with the slide stop lever while observing the angles of the slide stop lever and it's upper corner as it moves down the notch.

David E
June 4, 2010, 12:01 AM
Don't believe me?

You don't really want an answer, do you ?

The well-rounded pistolero knows both ways, utilizing the slide release and overhand. (Sling-shotting is a poor technique 99% of the time)

Both have merits, but correctly using the slide release is quicker. (I'm still trying to wear out the slide stop and slide on my 1977 Colt 1911......)

Weevil
June 4, 2010, 12:10 AM
You don't really want an answer, do you ?


Honestly I couldn't care less Dave, you're an arrogant know-it-all and frankly I'm tired of trying to be "civil" towards someone as rude and obnoxious as you are.




The well-rounded pistolero knows both ways, utilizing the slide release and overhand. (Sling-shotting is a poor technique 99% of the time)



Yes Mr. Pistolero you're right and Shawn Dodson is wrong.

Gimme a break already, you're not even in the same league as Shawn is so don't try to preach to me about how you're right and he's wrong!

BULL!!!!




Both have merits, but correctly using the slide release is quicker. (I'm still trying to wear out the slide stop and slide on my 1977 Colt 1911......)



You've also got an M&P that won't hold the slide open when you insert a mag.


Like I said, "they're your guns" feel free to abuse them to your heart's content.

GLOOB
June 4, 2010, 12:33 AM
For a right handed shooter, proper technique has you using your LEFT thumb to activate the slide release, not the gun-hand thumb.
This is surprising to hear. It doesn't seem like you can save quite as much of the already small time difference, that way.

And wouldn't that make all the extended aftermarket slide releases... just wrong?

I've never given all that much credence to the "harder to manipulate small things under stress," line of reasoning, before. But where the off-hand thumb is concerned, I might have to rethink things. Once in a shooting grip, I don't think I'd want to manipulate anything else but the trigger (and safety). I will give it a try next time I'm shooting, though. :)

olyeller
June 4, 2010, 12:54 AM
Gaston Glock researched what worked on successful guns and how they should be properly operated, his research lead to the design of the G17.

the Glock was not originally designed to release the slide with the slide lock. this lead to problems when under/improperly trained users insisted on releasing their slides in that manner and caused failures of the slide stop to hold the slide back on an empty mag...that area of the slide wasn't hardened to resist the scraping of the slide stop being forced downward against the recoil spring pressure.

I guess we can close the thread now! :)

I admit that the overhand is a solid, reliable method, but it takes your hand too far away from the gun, back where it needs to be to follow up for a quick after reload shot.

It all comes down to how trained and familiar with your weapon system you are; how many other handguns are you training with, and your individual performance with each of the particular methods.

David E
June 4, 2010, 02:25 AM
Honestly I couldn't care less Dave, you're an arrogant know-it-all and frankly I'm tired of trying to be "civil" towards someone as rude and obnoxious as you are.

I have not been rude to you, nor have I been uncivil. I merely stated another viewpoint that is contrary to your own. MOST people past 3rd grade can deal with that....

Yes Mr. Pistolero you're right and Shawn Dodson is wrong.

You said it, I didn't. :neener:

Gimme a break already, you're not even in the same league as Shawn is so don't try to preach to me about how you're right and he's wrong!

Where did I say he was wrong? I DID say in Post #44 (the one just above your Post #45): The well-rounded pistolero knows both ways, utilizing the slide release and overhand. (Sling-shotting is a poor technique 99% of the time)

See? I said to know BOTH ways.

This is twice in a row you failed to read the post just above yours and you made a silly statement. I see a pattern emerging....

I see where you might be confused (aside from that whole failing to read the posts thing) It's possible you simply don't understand the difference between "Overhand" and "Sling-shotting," so you think I dismissed all of Mr. Dodson's post. The two methods ARE different. I'm sure Mr. Dodson could explain it to you.....but will you read it?

David E
June 4, 2010, 02:36 AM
This is surprising to hear. It doesn't seem like you can save quite as much of the already small time difference, that way.

Ideally, you don't want to change your master grip at all. Once you seat the magazine with the weak hand, the left thumb pretty much falls right on the slide release on most guns. Depress the lever as you begin your push-out. By the time you're at full extension, you should be firing the shot.

And wouldn't that make all the extended aftermarket slide releases... just wrong?

Since the thread is about Glocks, I'd say no. The stock 17, 22, etc slide release needs a replacement. I find the factory extended release found on the 34/35 to be more than adequate. The 1911's, XD, XD-m and M&P are fine as-is.

I don't like the over-extended versions, as they'll cause more problems than they'll solve.

If I were to pick up a stock Glock 17 or a PPK, I'd use the overhand method of releasing the slide following a reload. It pays to know and practice both ways. (Slide release and Overhand)

saltydog452
June 4, 2010, 10:59 AM
I know next to nothing about glocks.

That said, controls with more mass would weigh more. With short slides and light weight frames, recoil forces are a bit more 'brisk' in Commanders and have caused extended slide locks and/or dual thumb safetys to engage w/o operator control.

I wonder if glock's extended slide lock/release is equally inclined to engage prematurely. I don't know. What do you think?

Thanks,

salty

1KPerDay
June 4, 2010, 01:06 PM
The aftermarket extended one that's actually longer (like twice as long, and bulbed outward) in the exposed area did indeed cause premature slide lock on my G30, but it had nothing to do with mass, which is still next to nothing. My thumb would hit it and lock the slide during recoil.

I swapped it with a stock one and it's back to "perfection". :D

BTW the factory "extended" stop isn't actually extended much... it just has a horizontal little tab on it for your thumb to engage. About the same size/length/weight as the OEM one.

bg226
June 4, 2010, 01:20 PM
I just wanted to know if using the Slide-Stop would damage the gun. I think I have the information I need.

1KPerDay
June 4, 2010, 01:41 PM
That doesn't mean this thread won't go on forever, though. :D

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