A little help wanted


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jnyork
June 3, 2010, 02:59 PM
My son is a Reserve Deputy Sheriff in Oregon, he sent this email this morning, I thought someone here might know something:


"I need to tap into your internet and networking skills. I'm needing to make several hundred "dummy" .40 cal rounds to be used on the Sheriff's Office range. This is to simulate misfires during our qualification processes. I have the brass (that's easy, with all the shooting that occurs), but I need a source for the plastic "bullets" - they need to be high visibility plastic - the ones we currently have (real beat up and disappearing rapidly) are neon green or international orange. Buying the whole "dummy" is expensive - so I'm looking to cut the costs and buy only the plastic bullets and make our own. Any ideas????? " :
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Shadow 7D
June 3, 2010, 03:17 PM
Check the reloading houses
like midway and brownells and weidners

GunsAmerica Fan
June 3, 2010, 04:08 PM
I would just use lead and drill a hole through the case. That is what I do to fill my cowboy belt. It's better they'll have the same weight as real and if you put a heavy crimp on them they will last forever.

The only thing you have to realize with dummys compared to real snap caps is that they don't cushion the firing pin if you are using a regular milled firing pin firearm. This can lead to work hardening of the pin and they do eventually snap, at the worst times. Snap caps have a spring cushion on the primer that resembles a real primer strike, which does not work harden the pin. This does not matter on many hammer fired modern pistols and all striker fired (like Glocks, XDs, SW M&P etc.)

I just realized that I should clarify lol. DO NOT drill a hole through a live round with powder in it. You take fired cases, tumble, size (and deprime if you wish) the case, bell the mouth for the bullet, seat the bullet, with the case empty, and give it a heavy crimp with the seating die, or a crimp die from Lee or whatever. Then sit with your drill press and put holes through the sides, so everyone has visual evidence that these are dummy rounds. Debur the holes if you can.

Shadow 7D
June 3, 2010, 05:11 PM
You can put pencil eraser in the primer pocket or spent primers and just spraypaint the rounds, same look and feel as the real thing

check places like century arms, they may have manufactured dummy rounds, then tend to be pretty inexpensive

kingpin008
June 3, 2010, 05:13 PM
If it's simply a matter of the paint wearing off of the old rounds, why not spend a few bucks on some new paint?

loud-mouth shnook
June 3, 2010, 05:43 PM
Cheaper Than Dirt has dummy ammo.

It's also possible to seat primers in the cases, pop the primers in a pistol, then seat whatever bullet you may want and VOILA!

Bluehawk
June 6, 2010, 06:54 AM
A very easy way to make dummy rounds is useing hot melt glue...just get a .40 caliber mold and a hot melt glue gun...useing the milky white glue sticks you simply fill the mold up...wait til it cools enough to the touch and pop out your "rubber dummy" bullet!
Deprime the cartridge case and glue in a pencil eraser...trim it flush with the base of the cartridge...seat the "dummy" bullet and crimp it in place just like a normal bullet but not so hard you ruin it.
It's easily distinguished from a live round because it's "milky white".
Making these is very easy and fairly inexpensive if you buy the cheap hot melt glue sticks.
I use these sometimes as practice bullets with a live primer...they work great and can be reloaded several times. You do have to open the flash hole a little bit with a drill though, otherwise the primer will push out/back and lock up the cylinder on a revolver.

loadedround
June 6, 2010, 08:32 AM
I have also used a hot glue gun to fill the empty primer pockets to cushion the hammer blows. It seems to me that it works just as well as pencil erasers, but doesn't destroy pencils. :)

Friendly, Don't Fire!
June 6, 2010, 08:41 AM
Pencil erasers and hot melt glue are not the same as the hardness of a snap cap primer - especially when they use a really hard plasting with a spring behind it.

Try poking a fired primer around the perimeter with an awl or nail set, and then try poking a pencil eraser, then try poking hot melt glue, then try poking a piece of hard plastic or plexiglass.

I think you will pretty quickly get the idea that different materials do not duplicate a live primer's resistence to the firing pin.

If you are looking for "cheap", you may end up paying more in the long-run should a firing pin break, especially at a time when you may be in the midst of a gun-fight.

Bluehawk
June 6, 2010, 10:23 AM
All thats needed is a cushion for the firing pin. The perimeter certainly is hard but centerfire guns are supposed to hit somewhere close to the center...not the edge of the primer. Erasers have been used for this purpose long before the modern plastic snap caps came along.

wishin
June 6, 2010, 10:36 AM
If you are looking for "cheap", you may end up paying more in the long-run should a firing pin break, especially at a time when you may be in the midst of a gun-fight.

Agreed. Spend the money for snap caps.

Taurus 617 CCW
June 6, 2010, 10:38 AM
If they are for Glock pistols you can dry fire them all day long and not hurt anything. For home made dummies I just use a new copper bullet, an old range case and seat it as normal. Then I paint the rounds with Dykem blue steel layout fluid. It stays on pretty well and gives the dummies a blue color, easily identifiable by the RSO.

For the commercial variety that are already made, brownells has them here:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/sid=16772/pid=31872/sku/Centerfire_Handgun_Dummies___40_S_W__per_50

[url]http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/sid=25866/pid=9923/sku/_40_Smith___Wesson_Yellow__Qty_50[url]

Taurus 617 CCW
June 6, 2010, 10:50 AM
Just found these from a law enforcement supply place. These were used at the last handgun training class I took:

http://www.letargets.com/estylez_item.aspx?item=ST-40

VA27
June 6, 2010, 11:50 PM
[URL=http://www.precisiongunspecialties.com/[/URL]

All poly training rounds. I've used these and they last forever, unless you lose them. Tougher than homemade and easier, too. MSRP is $3.50 for a 5-pack, maybe cheaper if the S.O. buys them in bulk from a supplier.

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