Easiest Slide


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Mudinyeri
June 6, 2010, 11:51 AM
Did some searching and couldn't find a topic that addressed my question ....

I'm trying to get my wife to consider carrying but she's a bit of a "delicate flower." :D We've tried DA revolvers and she can barely pull the trigger on most of them let alone shoot accurately while doing so. We've tried several automatics and she does well with trigger pull on most of the DA-only guns we've tried but she struggles to rack the slide on virtually every gun she's fired.

Here's what we've tried so far:
- SA XD40 SC
- SA XD45 Tactical
- Kahr CW40
- Beretta 92FS
- Glock 26
- Glock 30

So, here's the question ... What, in your experience (not opinion) was the easiest slide to rack on a 9 mm, or larger, caliber DA semi-auto. I'd like to narrow things down as we continue to look for a gun that will fit her. I'd also like to avoid guns with thumb safeties.

Thanks.

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shockwave
June 6, 2010, 12:41 PM
No matter how delicate, if a woman can handle getting up and getting dressed in the morning, she's plenty strong enough to rack a slide. The issue is usually technique. Have her study the patented Cornered Cat slingshot or overhand (http://corneredcat.com/RunGun/rack.aspx) maneuvers and see which is easier.

The deeper issue here is one of mindset. The firearm is lifesaving gear. If you think of it that way, of course racking a slide is a piece of cake. It's only going to be a problem if the user wants it to be easy, and that suggests to me that maybe this isn't the right time to be even dealing with this at all.

beeenbag
June 6, 2010, 12:45 PM
My wife also is a small woman that wants to carry but not very strong, or coordinated for that matter, and after getting the slide back is when the problems start for her. You might want to watch for limp wristing. This was the deal breaker for me, she is a revolver shooter now thru and thru.

WarlockFirearms
June 6, 2010, 12:56 PM
My wife has trouble racking some semi-auto slides as well, her hands just aren't very strong. One of the easiest for her, of the pistols I own, is my Beretta PX4 in 9mm. The recoil spring seems lighter than most similar 9mms, probably due to the rotary locking system, and the safety on the slide gives a nice solid lump to hold on to when cycling the pistol.

oldfool
June 6, 2010, 12:57 PM
I would say the Taurus 9mm model PT99AS or PT92 (same gun re-labeled) full size
but I doubt it's any easier than the Beretta 92 ("same" gun)

think about a tip up barrels, there are some tip ups in at least some smaller calibers like 32, 380
is it absolutely MUST be 9mm or larger ?
(yeah I know the implications, but a little less bang still beats a loud shout for help when there is no help)
Browning used to do a 380 tip up, ~13 rounds of "wussie" goes a long way towards curing bad attitude

is it absolutely MUST be a semi-auto ?
any revolver that has a SA hammer is real easy trigger pull, all calibers, all frame sizes

true, learning to push/pull will cure
but I have seen some who just cannot, and it just wrong to get pompous over that.. (especially w/ a wife :what:)

Shadow 7D
June 6, 2010, 12:58 PM
Might I suggest a revolver
or a gym membership?

there are techniques, it really doesn't take that much power
often 9mm, full sized have easier slides than smaller caliber due to the fact that 9mm requires a locking action and the smaller caliber rely on slide weight and spring pressure to keep the action closed while firing.

Nushif
June 6, 2010, 01:04 PM
I'd agree. Show her the push/pull way of doing it and well ... let her rack a few slides.

But on the note of you yourself saying she's neither very strong nor coordinated... I do go to the gym with my wife for exactly those reasons and that has helped in empowering her way more than getting her an easy to use gun.
These days she's the one with the .45. Not me.

bskillet
June 6, 2010, 01:11 PM
Stoeger Cougar 9mm. My wife has no problems with it. Loosens up even better after the break-in period.

EDIT: Similar to Warlock's suggestion of the PX4, the Cougar has the same rotary design.

devildog32713
June 6, 2010, 01:14 PM
+1 shockwave! he nailed it right there, you don't do it right, it makes it really hard.

oldfool
June 6, 2010, 01:15 PM
http://www.berettaweb.com/Beretta%2080/Beretta%2086.htm

if willing to consider, this (I think ??) is still being made/sold WRONG AGAIN NO they don't make 'em anymore, me going to shut up now
link says it all
it is NOT a mini LCP or KelTec, is is not a straight blowback, WRONG yes it is a
blowback, sorry about that it's (as some folks who make fun of 380s say), " a REAL gun"

good luck, friend
cheap it ain't, but she is worth it

Shadow 7D
June 6, 2010, 02:58 PM
Actually, to make a point
The Kel Tec P3AT, and LCP are locked with a modified Browning HP type cam, so is the P32 for that matter

But remember the lighter the gun, the bigger the round, the more the recoil, the kick.

9mmepiphany
June 6, 2010, 04:01 PM
the Beretta 86 was definitely the answer for folks who didn't want to have to rack the slide to chamber a round. they just didn't sell well enough to stay in production...maybe because they were large for their chambering, being designed (modification of the Beretta 84) as a belt gun

the two easiest to rack slides i've experienced have been the Beretta 92 (non-tilting barrel) and the H&K P-7 (gas delayed) in a chambering larger than .22lr

Mudinyeri
June 6, 2010, 04:02 PM
I've worked with her on the Cornered Cat methods. No go.

I don't want her to have to think about cocking a hammer to be able to pull the trigger. Simple is best when under duress.

Thanks for the recommendations, from those who made them, on guns with lighter mechanisms. We'll take a look at them.

For those that have suggested smaller calibers ... I've considered that, but I'm not sure I'm willing to go there after only trying a handful of weapons.

smallbore
June 6, 2010, 04:19 PM
Have you considered the Sig P239? They come in 9mm, .40 S&W, .357 Sig

Lonestar49
June 6, 2010, 04:57 PM
...

Well, I bought my wife a NIB Sig P232 SL 380.. hard, long, DA pull, SA break was clean, but hammer hit was hard.. Racking the slide was very hard for her, plus some other things, sharp recoil being one..

So, being for my wife, I stepped up from 800 bucks, to 1100 bucks and got her the SA EMP 9mm and she loves it.. (so do I) 6500 rounds, later, proved reliable.

SA EMP SAO (light, same, trigger pull every time) 9mm 1911 9+1 load-out and she has no problems racking the slide (much less return spring force).. No double pull, just single action, and with 2 safety's, cocked and locked, she is very ccw happy with it, along with, they are little tack drivers.. Not to mention, she could, "easily" hand load all 3 new mags, all 9 rounds, with "ease" from the get-go (single stack mags), very nice feature, along with 3-dot night sights, wood grips, and, to boot, just an eloquent looking 3" bull barreled 1911

Not to mention, gun loves little hands, bigger hands.. (full grip, no pinkie extension)

Need pic, let me know


Ls

Cel
June 6, 2010, 05:04 PM
Stoeger Cougar 9mm. I would have to agree with this. Don't personally own one but I have racked the slide on more than one and they were all butter smooth. Ditto for the Beretta PX4.

Kingofthehill
June 6, 2010, 05:05 PM
Ruger P95.

I have a lot of guns and my Fiancee just loves the p95. Its the easiest gun to rack and the softest recoiling 9/40/45 that i have ever owned or shot.

Antihero
June 6, 2010, 05:11 PM
Laugh if you will but the easiest centerfire gun to rack ive tried is a HiPoint JCP 40 s&w.

The Lone Haranguer
June 6, 2010, 05:23 PM
Even a "delicate flower" should be able to rack a slide, although some guns are better for this than others. (More on this later.) It is more a matter of technique than sheer strength. There are also various hand and finger exercisers available. Increased hand and finger strength also has long term health benefits, e.g., less likely to be afflicted by arthritis in later years.

Here's what we've tried so far:
- SA XD40 SC
- SA XD45 Tactical
- Kahr CW40
- Beretta 92FS
- Glock 26
- Glock 30

I have to say, you picked some bad ones. ;) Any .40 or .45-caliber pistol, especially a compact one, is going to have a heavier recoil spring than its counterpart in 9mm, as well as less grip and slide to hold onto. The Glock 26 has a short grip, and the Beretta has safety levers that dig in. As an additional example, the CZ75, for all its virtues, has a terrible slide to rack because there is little exposed above the frame. I would suggest trying the Glock 19. It has a full length (for smaller hands) grip, a light recoil spring, no additional tension of a hammer spring, and a tall square slide with deep grasping grooves. Another is a 1911, despite its having a thumb safety. A 9mm or .38 Super one can run a lighter recoil spring than its .45 counterpart, and it too has a tall slide with deep grooves. I also presume her hands are small. It will have a slimmer grip than anything you tried (except for the Kahr) and a lighter, shorter reach trigger.

bg226
June 6, 2010, 07:55 PM
The Beretta PX4 feels lighter than the rest that I have tried. Good luck.

Shadow 7D
June 7, 2010, 02:33 AM
Take you wife to the gun shop and let her shop
the sling shot or over hand what ever
I don't really pay attention, as I usually just make sure no fingers are in the way and cock the gun.

You do it supported, even one handed if you have to, but another way, is to hold the slide bracing the side of your non-dominate hand against the edge of a table and use your support hand like a clamp to hold the slide while you PUSH the grip/frame to cycle the slide.

ALSO, on the tilt barrels, they are still around, but often by another Italian gun maker, FIE's and few other names, but basically the Beretta copied.

TonyT
June 7, 2010, 08:51 AM
Sevral years ago I purchasedthe Taurus PT-111 because the slide was able to be racked back by my wife. To make a long story short she never went through with her CPL anf I found the gun uncomfortable to shoot for extended session since my finger rubbed on the inside of the trigger guard. However for defensive purposes it still might be an option to consider.

ForumSurfer
June 7, 2010, 09:01 AM
or a gym membership?

Yeouch. No matter how well intentioned, that's just not a polite thing to recommend.

That being said, some good triceps targeting exercises at home will work. My girlfriend did it, and it works. Just s simple dumbbell, dome overhead extensions and bent over extensions 3x a week will tone them up. My girlfriend ended up with very visible results and as a side effect, noticed she had no trouble racking my 1911 any more. In her words, "It got rid of my saggy underarms." I wouldn't have called them "saggy," but they became very firm and tone in a short time.

edit:: I've notice that anyone who has had trouble racking the slide on a 45, had the same issue with a 9mm. There just isn't that much difference. My girlfriend was equally troubled by my 1911, my old beretta 96 or my glock 19. Likewise, once she built up more muscle and became more accustomed with the techniques cornered cat mentioned...she had zero trouble with any caliber. There never was a time period where she had no trouble with a 9mm, but trouble with a 45. There just isn't that much difference in the lb ft of torque you have to expend when racking the slide. Tightening and firming up her arm, practice and technique made all the difference.

Mudinyeri
June 7, 2010, 09:15 AM
Ironically, she works out almost every day. However, her focus is toning, not strength. She loves Yoga and Pilates.

We've gone to a couple of the local sporting goods stores, but I get a lot of the same type of stuff (unfortunately) that I've gotten here ... you just need to learn the technique ... you just need to practice .... Rather than trying to find a gun that works most of them are trying to sell what they have in the case. :banghead:

ForumSurfer
June 7, 2010, 09:45 AM
However, her focus is toning

Same deal with my g/f. Seriously, have her try the lying triceps extensions with 5lb weights. Makes a tremendous toning difference in a very short time. IMHO it would take months of yoga/pilates to achieve what a simple dumbbell exercise can do in two weeks. My g/f is far from being a body builder and loves the short, 3 exercise, 3 set 15 rep exercise that I helped her with so much she has her friends doing it.


3 sets 15x reps lying triceps dumbbell extensions.
3 set of 10-15x dumbbell kickbacks
3 sets of 10-15x one arm dumbbell triceps extensions (this one is really optional. If someone isn't used to low weight training, spending 10 minutes on the first two 2-3x a week will make a world of difference.)


5lbs is plenty. My g/f is 5'10" and tone to begin with, yet it took her weeks to work up to 10lbs. As a matter of fact, the first week she used only one 5lb dumbbell and I had to assist her heavily through the motions or she couldn't get 15 reps. Once she hit the 10 pounders, she no longer had trouble racking the slides.

Just my experiences with what sounds like similar issues, brother...not trying to tell you what to do. YMMV of course! Now if I can just get her to stop joking about her new "guns" while walking around the house flexing...:rolleyes:

easyg
June 7, 2010, 09:47 AM
Ruger P95.

Its the easiest gun to rack and the softest recoiling 9/40/45 that i have ever owned or shot.
+1.
With the P95 it is very easy to work the slide.

General Geoff
June 7, 2010, 01:49 PM
I've worked with her on the Cornered Cat methods. No go.

This is not an issue of ability. It sounds like she doesn't want to be able to rack the slide.

Mosey
June 7, 2010, 02:00 PM
I have 3 sisters, a wife and two daughters in addition to my mom. All shoot handguns to a least a basic level of proficiency. The thing that I have found with the slide-racking issue is that it is often not a question of strength but one of desire coupled with soft hands. In other words, if it hurts to cycle the slide, and motivation to do so is not very high, the lady might quit before she has used her full power in the attempt.

Most semi-automatic handguns have a bunch of sharp edges on the slide and most (not all) people do not have calloused hands. Bad combo.

A simple test might be to have your wife try to rack the slide while wearing a pair of gardening gloves. If she is able to do so you will have narrowed the search to guns with large smooth slides like Glock, Sig, Browning High Power, and 1911's. A "dehorn" or "melt" gunsmithing job should take care of the sharp edges and the large (tall) slide would enable her to grip it with her whole hand.

I would suggest that you try a 1911 in 9mm. The recoil springs are very light, the trigger is light and easy to reach and they have alot of slide to get hold of.

YMMV,
Mosey

RonBernert
June 7, 2010, 02:17 PM
If she's having trouble with a slide, try revolvers. If she then has trouble with the revolver, remember that if it's easier to pull the slide back, the recoil is greater. Soooo- Make it really easy to rack the slide, the recoil bops her in the forehead. With a revolver, you may be able to get her to fire it with 2 fingers in DA.
My example is my sister. She wants a CCW gun, but my .38, .357, .45....etc.. is just too big and SCARY (recoil, noise).. I'm going to get her a .22 WMR revolver. It'll shoot .22 long and .22 magnum. Recoil is very manageable, not scary or too intimidating for her to shoot and -believe it or not- it's very effective. It even beats swinging a big stick. Any gun ANY GUN on you and that you can use beats one left at home...

The Lone Haranguer
June 7, 2010, 05:43 PM
There is also the Beretta 86, a tipup barrel design that never requires racking the slide. But it is a 9-shot .380 the same size as a 16-shot, full-powered 9mm Luger Glock 19.

The S&W M&P compact is also a great gun.

Mudinyeri
June 7, 2010, 06:02 PM
With all due respect to General Geoff's psychology credentials ... I'm pretty certain that Mosey is as close as it comes to the root of the issue. Racking the slide is painful for her. Her hands and fingers are not used to handling hard metal objects with square edges.

I think she has some close-fitting work gloves that would be worth a try. Good suggestion, Mosey.

Enachos
June 7, 2010, 06:09 PM
STOEGER COUGAR!!!!!!

IMO, The stoeger cougar (and the beretta cougar) have the easiest working slides I have ever handled. You should definitely check them out!

sideways
June 7, 2010, 06:13 PM
Colt Mustang or 380 Gov I'd stay with checkered rosewood instead of fancy mother of pearl a lot easier to hold on to.Slide tension is very light but such a small pistol not a lot to hold on to thats why good grip material is important.

General Geoff
June 7, 2010, 06:43 PM
With all due respect to General Geoff's psychology credentials ...
I will readily admit that I am no shrink. I work by process of elimination. I know that any healthy adult human has ample arm strength to cycle the slide on most autoloading pistols (most six year old children can too). Since physical ability is not the problem, that only leaves a mental block.
I'm pretty certain that Mosey is as close as it comes to the root of the issue. Racking the slide is painful for her. Her hands and fingers are not used to handling hard metal objects with square edges.
Mosey's observations are spot on, IMO.

Shadow 7D
June 7, 2010, 06:49 PM
SO Far
gym membership, with focus on hand and arm strenght
practice with Cornered Cat's techniques (really should just get her to read the entire site)
try out a wide variety of handguns
get a good pair of SHOOTING glove, golf or baseball glove are ok, so to are some (car) driving gloved, the nice ones have gel palm pads, thin fingers and a special pad tip for your trigger finger.

And a few hours with a professional instructor (not you, to many fights, remember she will listen to everybody but you, you can tell her, but she don't get it, someone else mentions it in passing and they are a Sage)

Nick5182
June 7, 2010, 06:59 PM
Man...you guys are lucky...I've got to fight tooth and nail just trying to get my fiancée to even look at my handguns...

Manco
June 7, 2010, 10:20 PM
I'm trying to get my wife to consider carrying but she's a bit of a "delicate flower." :D We've tried DA revolvers and she can barely pull the trigger on most of them let alone shoot accurately while doing so. We've tried several automatics and she does well with trigger pull on most of the DA-only guns we've tried but she struggles to rack the slide on virtually every gun she's fired.

Some good advice on racking slides has already been given in this thread, and I'd like to add, based on personal observations, that even when your wife gets the hang of it, you'll want to make sure that she's had enough repetitions that she can consistently rack a slide after some time has passed between attempts.

As for DA revolvers, she could try placing her finger as low on the trigger as possible in order to get more leverage. If that's not enough, she could also try to pull with the first joint rather than the pad of her finger (might make learning trigger control more difficult, but it will give her additional leverage).

I've worked with her on the Cornered Cat methods. No go.

That's too bad, although honestly I find it kind of hard to believe in an absolute sense. If the main issue is her grip strength, then perhaps looking for the gun that has the greatest amount of slide grip would help. I don't know what gun that would be, but I've never racked a slide that has a more positive grip than the one on my M&P (on the other hand, it might be rough on her fingers).

The issue could be psychological, as it is with the not-so-delicate women in my household. Even for those who have an overwhelming amount of physical strength in relation to the task, racking a slide takes a certain amount of physical "assertiveness" in order to accomplish effectively. For most people it's not a problem, but some are a bit "shy" about applying force to small objects in the quick and hard manner that works best for this purpose. I've even seen some big guys struggle a little at first because they assumed that racking a slide takes almost no force or were trying not to damage the gun. Admittedly, I was guilty of the former myself as a rank beginner :o, although I had no difficulty powering it through once I realized how much force it really took. However, now that I have a good feel for it, I rack slides so sharply that I actually don't feel as though I'm applying any force whatsoever, ironically much like my initial, naive expectation--just BAM, and it's racked (a result of improved technique and a more experienced mindset).

I don't want her to have to think about cocking a hammer to be able to pull the trigger. Simple is best when under duress.

What if that's her best option overall? Simple is best, but training can overcome virtually any necessary and reasonable sacrifice in simplicity. With practice, one can fire a revolver in SA mode quite instinctively and rapidly by cocking the hammer with the "weak"-hand thumb and pulling the trigger with the "strong"-hand index finger. Both actions should be easy for anybody who is strong enough to lift a gun and fire it at all.

By the way, I'm almost ashamed to admit that the thought of making a "fanning gun" out of a single-action revolver actually crossed my mind (operated by thumb rather than actual fanning). That's probably not a good idea for a number of reasons, but it is a simple, workable solution nonetheless. :)

Thanks for the recommendations, from those who made them, on guns with lighter mechanisms. We'll take a look at them.

The easiest slide (or bolt) that I've ever racked was that of a Ruger Mark III, but I would suggest against a .22 LR semiautomatic for self-defense (not so much because of caliber but reliability). If you can find a .32 ACP that your wife can operate, then maybe that would be the way to go.

For those that have suggested smaller calibers ... I've considered that, but I'm not sure I'm willing to go there after only trying a handful of weapons.

Unfortunately, guns of the class you're primarily looking at are all largely similar in most respects, including the strength required to rack their slides (then again, it's more about technique and mindset than strength--if you can lift 15 lbs or so, then you can rack a slide).

angus6
June 8, 2010, 12:05 AM
And a few hours with a professional instructor (not you, to many fights, remember she will listen to everybody but you, you can tell her, but she don't get it, someone else mentions it in passing and they are a Sage)

This ^BTDT just built the wife a CCO and she was having a little problem racking it comfortably so I showed her to hold the slide and push the frame,,,, well why didn't I show her that years ago :fire:, tried to several time but this time she was willing to listen:banghead:

searcher451
June 8, 2010, 08:21 PM
My wife had all sorts of difficulties with the Walther PPK/S, S&W model, so I had her try an Interarms-made PPK/S. Same deal. I then had her try a Walther P88C, and she had no problems whatsoever with it. We next tried a full-sized P99 and then a P99C; same positive result. In my view, the larger the size of the pistol, the easier it becomes to rack the slide. That's not to say, however, that larger pistols make great concealed carry pieces.

From experience: Have your wife try any number of firearms, either borrowed or rented, until she finds that one that best fits her hand and eye and her ability to manipulate it easily. Picking one for her won't likely work for either one of you.

usp9
June 9, 2010, 07:33 AM
My wife has problems with all my major guns. I bought a Daewoo DH40 solely because it has a very easy action. The Daewoo did the trick. It's also an excellent pistol at a reasonable price.

Mudinyeri
June 9, 2010, 09:26 AM
From experience: Have your wife try any number of firearms, either borrowed or rented, until she finds that one that best fits her hand and eye and her ability to manipulate it easily. Picking one for her won't likely work for either one of you.

This is what we've been doing, but I was hoping to narrow the field a little.

I'd like to thank those who've made specific suggestions.

FLAvalanche
June 9, 2010, 11:31 AM
I had this problem with my ex-wife before she became such. Tried many semi-autos and we finally settled on the Bersa .380. The controls seemed to be smoother and she was able to rack the slide and use the slide release. Another benefit was that smacking the mag into a Bersa with the slide back will release the slide so when at the range or doing a reload she didn't need to operate the slide release.

Mudinyeri
June 13, 2010, 10:32 PM
Update: After working with my wife some more she can now rack the slide on my Beretta 92FS. It's my easiest slide but she still struggles with it. I need to find her some tight-fitting gloves to see if that helps with some of my other guns.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

killchain
June 14, 2010, 05:52 AM
My wife is 125lbs and 5ft 10in. She always had trouble racking the slide until I found a handgun she liked. Then the problem magically went away. :)

I've used the suggestion in this situation of using what I call the "push-pull." Push the lower as you pull the slide. Also, if you put all of your fingers on the grip instead of the "indexed finger," you get the extra strength of the index to help with the push. That isn't really a "train as you fight" idea but at the range it could help her out some.

Also, instead of the pinch on the slide, you could try a palm-down "combat rack" idea. Gotta be careful with slide bites though, and on some autoloaders it can cover the chamber.

Me personally, I index my trigger finger and do the pinch, and I always turn my pistol 90 degrees to the left. I live the "rack and roll" clearing technique. :)

harmon rabb
June 14, 2010, 08:36 AM
she's not racking it right. you have to be pretty strong to rack some slides using the slingshot method. if she racks it overhand, she can rack anything.

my fiancee is all of 5'2" and can rack the slide on anything i own this way.

Taurus 617 CCW
June 14, 2010, 09:07 AM
Mom had the same problem while shopping for her gun too and she's left handed to boot! We found the Beretta PX4 storm 9mm to be the easiest. She can also rack a broken-in Beretta 92FS but it's too big for carry. She shot my Glock 19 well but the mainspring was still a little stiff. There are outfits that offer lower power recoil springs for the compact and full size Glock pistols that make it easier to rack the slide but I caution you not to use hot ammo if you go that route. I gave her a gyro ball (made by dynaflex)for mother's day to strengthen up her forearms so she can rack the slide better.

http://www.rei.com/product/787691?preferredSku=7876910014&cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-datafeed-_-product-_-7876910014&mr:trackingCode=57FB9099-36A9-DE11-93DB-0019B9C043EB&mr:referralID=NA

If you have a Big 5 Sporting goods in your area they are under $20. Otherwise you could check Dick's sporting goods or REI like the link.

9mmepiphany
June 14, 2010, 11:28 AM
I gave her a gyro ball (made by dynaflex)for mother's day to strengthen up her forearms so she can rack the slide better.

it has been my experience that this is an excellent tool, but i've also seen it as an exercise in frustration for folks who just can't get them started ;)

Skylerbone
June 14, 2010, 12:17 PM
Kimber pepper blaster II. No gun. Wouldn't even consider it. I love my wife, I wish she would shoot, she has no interest. That may change and she is more than capable of racking all of my pistols.

If your better half lacks the physical strength or psychological determination to operate the gun's mechanics, what makes you think it won't be in an attacker's hands in short order?

Pepper spray puts 'em down period. My father still holds the record in a city of 100,000+ for people sprayed (unofficially of course and including other officers). In contrast, he fired his weapon three times over a 30+ year career which included 5 years in a major East Coast city, 24 in a decent sized Midwest city and 3 years at a govt. facility.

If you insist, and I pray you don't for now, then bite the bullet and send her to Gunsight for instruction from a female instructor. If it's a mental thing rather than physical having a group of women watching her might just do the trick. I've yet to see a woman back down from such a challenge in the presence of THEIR peers.

Guns and more
June 14, 2010, 12:39 PM
I'd suggest she forgo the 9mm. and take a look at the Sig 238. (it's a .380) Not only is it the easiest slide in my collection to rack, it is a soft recoiling firearm and actually fun to shoot at the range. Couple that with the small size as well as real night sights, and I think you have the perfect carry gun. Your list includes a Beretta 92, a fine firearm, but don't you think that's big and heavy for a lady to carry? Most likely it will sit unused, and how does that enhance safety?
Shooters poo-poo the .380, but I've never found anyone willing to be shot with one.
"Lady, is that only a .380? Ha, go ahead and shoot me, the bullets will just bounce off!"


But then guns aren't for everyone. Does your wife want to have a gun with her?

Ronsch
June 14, 2010, 12:58 PM
I have found the slide on the P1/P38 to be fairly easy to rack. My daughter is able to do so, and she is fairly small and a little weaker (she is 5'1" and 112 pounds.)

wombat13
June 14, 2010, 03:15 PM
My wife struggles to pull the DA trigger on snub-nose revolvers and could not rack the slide on my XD45, but she could shoot the XD45 just fine. She got instruction when she first got her pistol permit and could operate his G19 just fine.

Just like the OP is trying to do, I put together a list of easy to rack semi-autos (based on the responses in this thread and one on XDtalk.com). I wanted her to get something that was small enough that she could carry it if she really wants to but big enough that it won't be uncomfortable to shoot. I also wanted her to get a handgun with passive safeties only (she will never train enough to commit disengaging the safety to muscle memory). My list was:

Beretta PX4, G19 or G26, Kahr PM9 or CW9, S&W M&P9C, Springfield XD9sc, Walther PPS or P99. We went to the LGS this morning and she handled the G19, G26, M&P9C and the PPS. She could operate all of them and liked them all, but she really liked the M&P9C. We'll pick it up tomorrow.

Mudinyeri
June 15, 2010, 08:49 AM
Picked up a Kel-Tec PF9 yesterday. My wife can rack the slide and likes how it feels in her hand. Headed to the range on Thursday to try it out.

mljdeckard
June 17, 2010, 12:26 AM
I started a similar thread the other day.

I have always been in the camp that says any able-bodied adult can rack a slide. It's just a matter of getting used to it.

However, I have found that my mother, who is over 65, and had an injury to her left wrist a few years ago, just can't do it on anything bigger than a .22. I'm picking through options to see what she can handle, but the long and short of it is, she will have to learn to handle either the pull of a DA revolver or the spring of an auto slide. I have been (against my will) training my female soldiers to shoot M-9s lately, and the truth is, they DO have a remarkably easy rack, but they are terrible for people with small hands. My soldiers were mostly using the weak hand to work the safety.

when I arrive at a workable solution I will post it.

Steve in Allentown, PA
June 17, 2010, 11:35 AM
Tell her not to pull the slide back.

Instead, tell her to hold onto the slide while pushing the frame forward.

I know it sounds a little odd but give it a try.

- - - - - - - - - -

IMHO, a full size Government Model 1911 has got to be one of the easiest autos to rack the slide on. Chambered in .38 Super, it's a soft recoiling pistol.

makarovnik
June 17, 2010, 12:16 PM
How about a cute little .22lr semi-auto pistol?

mljdeckard
June 17, 2010, 02:23 PM
steve, she can't do that either because of her injury.

JDGray
June 17, 2010, 03:07 PM
By far the easiest slide to rack is on a Ruger P345, that I personaly have racked. I have to agree with the others on learning to rack by holding the slide, and pushing the frame forward;)

wombat13
June 17, 2010, 03:58 PM
trolling deleted- John
I know I may be new around here compared to many others, but someone needs to call you on this. Your tone is not consistent with this forum. Maybe it is typical to ridicule other posters on forums like Glock Talk, but it isn't at the High Road. You need to be more respectful.

Greg528iT
June 17, 2010, 04:27 PM
wombat13

Thank you. I am also relatively new, and have been trying to take The High Road. I am tired of critical and non productive posts.

ricebasher302
June 17, 2010, 11:33 PM
Walther PK-380. Try it.

IlikeSA
June 17, 2010, 11:40 PM
Not a suggestion for a gun, but why not load it and cock it for her, and then tell her not to unload it. I keep all of my pistols loaded so I never have to worry about a loading error, or weakening the spring, as well as knowing they are ready to go if needed. There is no reason to unload a gun unless it is not on your person and there are small children (or stupid adults) around.

JShirley
June 18, 2010, 01:45 AM
Folks, if there's an issue, please alert staff by hitting the alert (exclamation triangle) icon in the lower left corner of the post. Please do NOT reply to trolling remarks in kind.

Several of the posts in this thread have been edited or removed. Let's keep the High Road from here on out.

Incidentally- since it's unfortunately apparently not obvious- claiming any popular and well-used handgun platform is absolute junk is pure trolling, and subject to disciplinary action. If the platform in question is commonly used by some of the most elite units and shooters alive, it also may make the poster look dreadfully ill-informed or just plain lacking in reasoning power.

John

mljdeckard
June 18, 2010, 02:02 PM
IlikeSA-

That solves the loading problem, but not the malfunction clearing problem. It may ultimately be something to consider however.

I have just spent a week training my female soldiers that they need to know how to load, clear, rack, etc, with either hand, one handed, etc. I don't want to now tell my mom that it's ok to carry if she can't perform all of the basic functions of the pistol.

Steve in Allentown, PA
June 21, 2010, 10:13 PM
steve, she can't do that either because of her injury.

I don't know if Beretta still makes it but once upon a time they made a very nice .380 that had a tip-up barrel. All you had to do to load it was flip a lever that would allow the chamber end of the barrel to rotate up allowing an easy, drop in, insertion of a loaded round into the chamber. Then you'd push the barrel down until it locked and you were ready to rock. No worrying about pulling back the slide since there was no need to.

mljdeckard
June 21, 2010, 11:16 PM
It's the 86. I have been looking at it.

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