How were your firearms stolen?


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FourteenMiles
June 9, 2010, 06:35 PM
I was thinking if people share how their firearms were stolen we could avoid these circumstances and better protect our property.

I've never had a firearm stolen from myself. Once though a collegue told me he would inspect peoples firearms pretending to be a prospective buyer and come back later and steal the firearms. I assume he would case the location (firearm owners home) and see how easy of a target it was.

So now I never sell anything out of my home, or person to person for that matter. I prefer to use a service: like consignment, internet auction, ect.

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shiftyer1
June 9, 2010, 06:37 PM
a collegue? things that make ya go hmmm

jon_in_wv
June 9, 2010, 06:45 PM
hmmmmmm, so your "colleague" steals firearms and we are supposed to tell you how we had ours stolen? What are you going to do, start a training manual for crooks? I'll pass.

FourteenMiles
June 9, 2010, 06:48 PM
Ha, just realized how shady this seems. He was my collegue in a normal business. He definetley was a few cards short of a full deck, he did not last long.

sonier
June 9, 2010, 06:50 PM
by a boat.........that capsized, couldnt help it, sorry lol

leadcounsel
June 9, 2010, 07:56 PM
I had mine stolen the day after some prospective buyer came to look at them.... hhhmmmm....

Did you report this collleague to the cops? They could set up a sting to get this crook of the streets - afterall many people here meet FTF...

Mr.Davis
June 9, 2010, 08:12 PM
I don't think anyone on this board owns any guns. They're dangerous, after all ;)

Buck Snort
June 9, 2010, 08:17 PM
I'm lucky that I've never had a gun stolen. I do, however, keep a low profile and don't have big clues around my domicile ("Protected by Smith & Wesson") nor on my vehicles. I put my NRA sticker on my gunsafe, out of sight from the street. Additionally, I'm very careful about who I let into my house. If somebody gets pissed off because I won't let'm in that's just too bad.

hmphargh
June 9, 2010, 08:26 PM
A work crew working on a house next door to an acquaintance's broke in by throwing a rock through the window and stealing cash, jewelry, and guns while said acquaintance was at work. Nothing was recovered because the acquaintance didn't keep records of ownership, but some fairly unique items showed up at a pawn shop.

Mags
June 9, 2010, 08:26 PM
Mine get stolen when I trade them in.

Shopping A Round
June 9, 2010, 08:48 PM
Man, the suburbs! What a great safe place! Screw that. I plan on holing up on my porch out in the country with my coon dogs for my remaining years.

FourteenMiles
June 9, 2010, 09:59 PM
"Did you report this collleague to the cops?"

No I never did. He told me this on one side of the country when he was from the other side of the country (probably why he admitted it in the first place), and from what I understood it had happened quite a while previously.

Besides I would not have had the cajones to make an enemy out of someone who knowinging burgals the home of a gun owner.

22-rimfire
June 9, 2010, 10:00 PM
Had one stolen. Tisk Tisk. The gun was the least valuable thing taken. Never lost any sleep over the gun.

Something to be said for guns being "stolen" when you trade with dealers at gun shows.

SaxonPig
June 9, 2010, 10:09 PM
Lost 23 guns in a residential burglary in 1985. Police report is likely public record. Crowbar used to open back door and I foolishly didn't have a safe. Two subsequent burglaries resulted in zero guns lost because by then I had bought a safe.

PS; As of this date 4 have been recovered, one 18 years after the crime.

MedWheeler
June 9, 2010, 10:10 PM
Had one stolen during a vehicle burglary. My vehicle was not specifically targeted; many in the neighborhood were hit that night. My revolver was recovered about two years later and returned to me.

Zoidberg523
June 9, 2010, 11:15 PM
Once though a collegue told me he would inspect peoples firearms pretending to be a prospective buyer and come back later and steal the firearms. I assume he would case the location (firearm owners home) and see how easy of a target it was.

No offense, but why didn't you contact the police to report him right after he told you? Other side of the country or not does not matter - he committed a felony (I think?). I don't believe in karma, per se, but I hope that something catches up with that guy.

FourteenMiles
June 9, 2010, 11:29 PM
Besides the reasons I already mentioned I would need the criminal to produce the evidence and that seems unlikely.

Now can we drop it, am I the only person who has had to work with unsavory people?

WNTFW
June 9, 2010, 11:40 PM
I have heard of a few examples of people getting there guns stolen from their safe. They left the safe open. Not just unlocked. OPEN!

I am shocked at how many people don't lock their safe.

ArtP
June 9, 2010, 11:42 PM
Besides the reasons I already mentioned I would need the criminal to produce the evidence and that seems unlikely.

Now can we drop it, am I the only person who has had to work with unsavory people?

After reading this thread from the beginnning I can see you asked an innocent question and got turned on your head. Some of it maybe because you don't have a long history of posting here. Apparently I don't have any credibility either. No one has turned in every crime we've ever been aware of it and we ALL know it.

Back to your question. I've had only one stolen and it was stolen off the top of my refridgerator by a friend of a friend that was invited into the house. I didn't realize it until the next day. I found, confronted and threatened the guy who I know stold it, but I think he had already dumped it. No police report, couldn't prove anything. I chalked it up to my own ignorance and moved on.

Jim Watson
June 9, 2010, 11:44 PM
I failed to lock a window on a mild evening. Guns left out of the safe went walkabout.
All but one were recovered the next day when the punk ran his stolen car into a telephone pole while fleeing the scene of his next breakin. The one was not in the car or his home, I figure he gave the obsolete revolver to a pal.

wideym
June 10, 2010, 12:50 AM
I had a Colt Trooper MK III stolen along with the locked pistol case it was in when I flew back home to Arkansas from Alaska.

I had a layover in LAX, which was where the pistol was stolen. I had duct taped the case to my duffle bag instead of putting it in my duffle, after showing it was unloaded and signing the form at the check-in desk.

I paid $150 for it back in 89' from another soldier in my unit. My chain of command told me to over-estimate the value of the contents, because the airline would de-value the contents. I put the price of $1,500 on the claim form and promptly forgot about it. Six months later I get a check from the airline for $1,500, which took me six months of bar hopping with my buddies to spend.

Zoidberg523
June 10, 2010, 01:21 AM
After reading this thread from the beginnning I can see you asked an innocent question and got turned on your head. Some of it maybe because you don't have a long history of posting here. Apparently I don't have any credibility either. No one has turned in every crime we've ever been aware of it and we ALL know it.


Your number of posts and your credibility have nothing in common - that is foolish (though some other posters do feel that way). I said "no offense" and meant it - I just wanted to know (as an aside - I am sure that no criminal evidence is needed to accuse someone of anything: only to convict them).

Sorry I couldn't contribute anything to this thread, having (luckily) never had a firearm stolen. I sympathize with those of you who have, and hope that you are able to someday reclaim your property.

ArtP
June 10, 2010, 01:50 AM
I said "no offense" and meant it - I just wanted to know (as an aside - I am sure that no criminal evidence is needed to accuse someone of anything: only to convict them).
.

My comment wasn't directed at you. I read the whole thread once and noticed several people jumped on this guy without really knowing all of the circumstances. I wasn't picking anyone out or remembering names. But as you mentioned, some people do relate credibility to length of time here.

Me personally, I think there is a such thing as tattling and if this guy turned in his coworker for a theft in another state five years ago, he just may have jeapordized his job (for no good!) - who knows. People are just too quick to judge. We all would like "do overs", no need to spank the guy. <not directed at you personally>

KarenTOC
June 10, 2010, 03:23 AM
I wouldn't report a coworker for bragging about crimes commited many miles away and many years ago - mainly because I'd assume that no one is stupid enough to admit to actual criminal behavior on the job (foolish, I know - people really ARE that stupid). I would probably assume he was trying to manufacture a bad-boy reputation to impress... well, whoever would be impressed by that kind of behavior.

I've never had any guns stolen. Except for a few close friends, nobody knows I have guns, and I don't look like what folks around here would consider the typical gun owner. I have no bumper stickers, signs, logo clothing etc that would "out" me.

I'm not happy with my current security measures, but I'm limited in what I can do in and to my condo unit. I'm still investigating options.

Zoidberg523
June 10, 2010, 04:48 AM
Me personally, I think there is a such thing as tattling and if this guy turned in his coworker for a theft in another state five years ago, he just may have jeapordized his job (for no good!) - who knows.

I can see your point (and it is a valid one). However, I must also say that the theft of a firearm (if indeed it happened, and the guy wasn't just trying to "impress" the OP) is a very serious crime - one which warrants investigation (after all, SaxonPig, above, regained a firearm he had lost 18 years previously).

That is not to say that I cannot see it from the OP's perspective - guy you hardly know tells you about some crimes from way back that you can hardly believe, which supposedly happened in another state: easily dismissed. I can also see how the OP may be hesitant in going to authorities if they have reason to believe that they are the only person that said coworker has told this to (because they then obviously know who told on them).

I wasn't there, so I guess that it really isn't possible to make an informed decision.

NavyLCDR
June 10, 2010, 10:34 AM
I had to leave mine with my wife when I left for deployment to Iraq. She filed for divorce while I was there. Then before we went to court and before there was any kind of property settlement she sold 13 guns and about 3,000 rounds of ammo for $4,000. :(

Zoidberg523
June 10, 2010, 10:40 AM
She should be beaten, then sued. Is there anything you can do as far as a lawsuit? :fire:

FLAvalanche
June 10, 2010, 11:05 AM
I read the whole thread once and noticed several people jumped on this guy without really knowing all of the circumstances.

Unfortunetly that's pretty much par for the course here...A lot of people need to take off the tin foil hats and unclench.

Coyote3855
June 10, 2010, 11:07 AM
Two situation. I had a couple of guns stolen when my stepson and a friend broke into my "secure" gun room through a boarded up window. Police recovered the guns but would not return the switchblade that was also taken. And a bb pistol didn't come back. I bought a gun safe.

A friend and his son had two rifles stolen from a locked SUV. They loaded the truck the day before leaving for an elk hunt and were apparently observed by a roofing crew working in the neighborhood. I believe both guns were eventually recovered and returned although it took a year to get the first rifle back from the police.

heeler
June 10, 2010, 12:10 PM
I had several rifles and shotguns stolen.
My home was broken into and they cleaned my clock.
An estimated $6,000.00 in value and never recovered.
And yes I reported it to the police and insurance company.
Fwiw not even an hour ago I was reading the local online news that the police just broke up a local home burglary group who stole a great many firearms including a .50 caliber snipers rifle.
Glad they are now in jail.

wishin
June 10, 2010, 01:43 PM
My house was burglarized while my wife and I were at work a number of years ago. Two of the handguns were unfired in presentation cases, the other was a nightstand gun, which was recovered a few years later.

Rail Driver
June 10, 2010, 01:46 PM
I've never had a firearm stolen (hopefully it stays that way) but a friend of mine had her gun stolen by someone that helped her move house.

Zoidberg523
June 10, 2010, 02:03 PM
Originally Posted by heeler
Fwiw not even an hour ago I was reading the local online news that the police just broke up a local home burglary group who stole a great many firearms including a .50 caliber snipers rifle.

50 cal sniper rifle, media-style:

http://i548.photobucket.com/albums/ii346/gator4257/Picture006.jpg

Originally Posted by Coyote3855
I had a couple of guns stolen when my stepson and a friend broke into my "secure" gun room through a boarded up window. Police recovered the guns but would not return the switchblade that was also taken.

My sympathies. It sucks to not be able to trust those closest to you! I presume he was punished?

heeler
June 10, 2010, 02:30 PM
Zoidberg,the .50 I mentioned was the real deal.
Sadly the picture also showed numerous hunting rifles and shotguns.
All these homes were in more rural counties that surround Houston.
This made it a lot easier for the theives times wise and security wise.

Coyote3855 I worked with a guy who had his very own white punk on dope son steal and sell his own guns not once but twice.
Second time Dad had enough and had him prosecuted and he served time.

welldoya
June 10, 2010, 05:13 PM
I've been lucky and never been broken into but I've got a friend who had a Ruger MkII and a Browning BDM stolen by a high school kid who came home with his son one day. They kept a key under a rock near the door . The kid saw the key and came back later when nobody was home.
The boy's mother found the BDM in her son's closet and called my friend and ask if he was missing it. They had only been gone a couple of days and he didn't even know it. The boy denied taking the MKII. Probably had already sold it.

The Lone Haranguer
June 10, 2010, 06:26 PM
Mobile home (poor quality doors and locks) burgled while I was at work, not secured in a safe. The culprits turned out to be the teenage kids of my neighbors, which is why I snort derisively whenever someone brings up "neighborhood watches." :fire:

Combatcomm
June 10, 2010, 06:55 PM
I had to leave mine with my wife when I left for deployment to Iraq. She filed for divorce while I was there. Then before we went to court and before there was any kind of property settlement she sold 13 guns and about 3,000 rounds of ammo for $4,000.

Same thing happen to me. :cuss:

leadcounsel
June 10, 2010, 07:10 PM
To my fellow brothers in arms, sorry to hear 'bout your wives misbehavior.

I've seen similar things MANY times in my profession. REALLY CRAPPY for a person to do that to another.

Grumpy shooter
June 10, 2010, 08:25 PM
Had a home break-in a few years ago, they got a .357 out of a dresser drawer and a .38sp hanging on the bed post. Happened just after a wallpaper crew(young women) had finished. Later found out both were dopers. They didn't get the real stash though, they weren't quite as smart as they thought.

By the way all of those nosy neighbors that normally can tell you when you farted last didn't see a thing.

Clifford
June 10, 2010, 08:27 PM
".50 cal sniper rifle" sorry I just want to puke everytime I hear that. I could be wrong but I believe most military and police snipers use .308. The .50BMG was designed to bust up trucks, light armor, planes, ect.

Yes it works great on soft targets but a .308/7.62 can do the job of sniping at a lower cost, lighter weight, less noise, less recoil and faster follow up shots. The only plus of the .50 (on soft targets) is it's long range advantage. Besides the part that makes the sniper rifle work isn't the rifle, it's the man/woman on the trigger.

Calling an accurate rifle a sniper rifle is like calling a semi-auto carbine an assault rifle. You don't call a car an highspeed mobile body crusher do you? It's just a tool made to perform a task.

Sorry, rant over! Back on topic.
I've had two guns turn up missing. 1st one was an 870 that I left behind the seat of my truck. I had been out dove hunting before school and I simply put the shotgun behind the seat of my truck. I forgot about it and left it in my truck overnight. The next morning I found my truck had been broken into and the shotgun gone.

The second one was a .22lr pengun that I used to keep in my toolbox at work. One of my co-workers discovered it and stole it. I raised hell and Cussed out everyone at work trying to find who took it. It never turned up and I started keeping pictures and serial numbers on all my firearms after that. I also quit working at that shop, I figured if I can't trust my co-workers I shouldn't work there.

So lesson learned, keep serial numbers and pictures of all firearms. Also I CC at work instead of keeping the gun in my toolbox.

Buck Snort
June 10, 2010, 08:32 PM
wideym wrote: "I put the price of $1,500 on the claim form and promptly forgot about it. Six months later I get a check from the airline for $1,500, which took me six months of bar hopping with my buddies to spend."

HAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!! For a change somebody rips off the airline instead of them ripping off a customer!! Gotta love it.

Buck Snort
June 10, 2010, 08:37 PM
I had to leave mine with my wife when I left for deployment to Iraq. She filed for divorce while I was there. Then before we went to court and before there was any kind of property settlement she sold 13 guns and about 3,000 rounds of ammo for $4,000. :(
Ain't love grand?!!

Sean T
June 11, 2010, 03:18 PM
I was just 10 years old when it happened. All of firearms mysteriously disappeared when we moved. No real monetary value, 2 .22 bolt action rifles and a beat up Mauser. But they were my late grandfather's, so they had a lot of sentimental value. Be careful when you move guys. Moving men are great for heavy items like furniture but I would keep a close eye on your valuables and move them yourself.

merlinfire
June 11, 2010, 03:49 PM
Haven't had any stolen yet, but I keep telling some people in my family that their next gun purchase should be a safe. If its an investment, treat it like one. If you've got 10 grand invested in something that can be completely gone tomorrow, you gotta protect it!

spur0701
June 11, 2010, 06:50 PM
My neighboor has a vacation/retirement home down in VA that was hit a few years ago, he lost about a dozen guns and a lot of tools. The house was isolated and sits on 22 acres with no close neighboors and sat empty during the week. A couple of weeks before the break in he had several contractors come out to give estimates on some tree removal (had lost several in a storm)....he felt it was one of them.

A co-worker was visiting a friend in Philly and went into a bar for a few drinks in a not so great area. Left her Sig 229 locked in the glove compartment and it got ripped by the time she came out.

I've been blessed and have never gotten hit, but as others have mentioned above I don't advertise what I have....but I do advertise my big dog to every delivery driver or contractor that visits me.....

rscalzo
June 11, 2010, 07:13 PM
Years back I handled a reported theft of handguns. The owner, who in my opinion was not the sharpest tool in the shed left his pistol bag visible in the rear of his CJ7 with the soft top on. As area was a shopping mall and a popular site for MV break-ins. The theft simply unzipped the top and removed the bag while the owner was in a restaurant.

What amazed me is that he actually thought he had them secured and couldn't understand why someone would unzip the top.

Must have led a sheltered life.

Leanwolf
June 11, 2010, 07:16 PM
In 1959 I was in the Army, stationed at Fort Gordon, Georgia. My parents lived in Little Rock, Arkansas. I had left several guns with them. I received a letter from my father that someone had broken into their home and among a bunch of other stuff, they'd stolen my second generation Colt's Single Action Army, .38 Special, factory nickel plated, factory ivory grips, 5 1/2" barrel, excellent condition.

Just as so many, it was unsecured on a shelf in a bedroom closet. Even though my father turned the serial number in to the police, we never heard from it again.

Oddly enough, the thief or thieves did not take several other guns which was strange.

I still miss that revolver!

L.W.

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