state crime rates compared with gun laws


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N3rday
December 2, 2003, 10:54 PM
Anyone know where each individual states crime rate is compared with its gun laws?

If not, I could make a big list starting at the lowest crime, going up, and the comparable gun laws for each state, i.e. CCW and % of ownership

Would take a long time though...anyone know of any resources? They would have to be from a governmental study, otherwise they could be tilted either way...

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MicroBalrog
December 3, 2003, 03:56 PM
Somebody did it on THR already, does anyone have the link?:confused:

TallPine
December 3, 2003, 03:58 PM
Well, you could use the Brady Bunch grade system for one side ... A = most gun laws; F = least gun laws

N3rday
December 3, 2003, 04:47 PM
What would I put in when doing a search for it?

tyme
December 3, 2003, 05:19 PM
It's difficult to compare crime rates to State ratings because ratings are a vast simplification of the States' gun laws; too much information is lost. For instance, ratings suffer if a State has an outright ban on machine guns, but such a ban is unlikely to have any effect on crime in the absence of large riots.

WT
December 3, 2003, 05:25 PM
Well I saw on the news last night that Florida has the worst crime record of any state. Something like 800+ violent crimes per 100,000 people. On the flip side, Florida has some of the most liberal gun laws in the USA.

Make of this what you will.

P95Carry
December 3, 2003, 05:28 PM
I have no data to hand in support of this but ... broadly at least .. there seems a totally logical correlation between CCW and crime figures. In as much as .... ''shall issue'' states with minimal peripheral restrictions .. tend to be about the lowest. PA has I think an approx 6% carry uptake .. and overall is lower crime than, say, MD or IL.

Of course all places will still see ''pockets'' of higher crime .... but think maybe of DC, Chicago etc .... probably amongst the most dangerous places to be at times .... and citizen's weapons all but forbidden ... criminal's field-day!!

My geography is bad .. but I remember too a comparison between Orange County CA ..... with it's carry options ...... and the adjacent areas where carry was not permitted. Figures I think were almost totally predictable.

Some here will be better able to answer that one.

mountainclmbr
December 3, 2003, 06:53 PM
I would be wary of state crime data. Many big city police departments are corrupt and destroy reports on serious crimes if they feel they cannot solve the crime. I have heard stories of victims checking on progress only to find there is no longer a record of the crime. The latest FBI data I saw showed the northeast to be the safest area and the midwest to be the most crime ridden. I am just a bit suspicious about this!

7.62FullMetalJacket
December 3, 2003, 07:17 PM
Sounds like a job for a heavy, like Lott et al. The data must be corrected, verified and normalized for a proper comparison.

What would be intersting and within your scope would be this:

Compare two cities of comparable size and demographics, 1 in a CCW state and 1 in a non-CCW state.

The problem, as I see it, is that CCW is usually allowed in open, rural states. Urban jungles, for the most part, do not allow CCW. Open, rural populations tend to have less crime and are more neighborly:)

Standing Wolf
December 3, 2003, 11:42 PM
The problem, as I see it, is that CCW is usually allowed in open, rural states. Urban jungles, for the most part, do not allow CCW. Open, rural populations tend to have less crime and are more neighborly.

I think that's a chicken and egg problem: which came first?

7.62FullMetalJacket
December 4, 2003, 12:26 AM
Standing Wolf,

I am with you:D

An armed society is a polite society;)

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