probably a "dumb" question


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NOLAEMT
June 19, 2010, 09:05 PM
So I am new to the world of wheelguns, having just received my 686p pro series. I love the gun, even if shooting a double action revolver takes some getting used to. if anyone has any adivce id love to hear it.

now on to my question. When lubricating the revolver, should I put any oil on the inside of the chambers in the cylinder? will this help with extraction or is this a bad thing?

thanks!

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LawofThirds
June 19, 2010, 09:48 PM
That's a very bad thing.

It can lead to overpressures and bulged chambers.

Plus, oil would just keep grime in your chambers, causing them to stick earlier.

At most, when you clean each chamber, follow with a patch lightly oiled and then follow that with a dry patch, just enough oil to form an invisible film that will prevent corrosion during storage.

NOLAEMT
June 19, 2010, 10:10 PM
that's what I thought, but I wanted to make sure, thanks for the help!

Phydeaux642
June 19, 2010, 10:25 PM
So I am new to the world of wheelguns

Watch out, them little buggers tend to multiply.

Drail
June 19, 2010, 10:34 PM
Yup, keep the chambers and the barrel as clean and dry as you can. That's all they need. If extraction seems difficult it's usually a sign of buildup from firing residue and you need to thoroughly clean the chambers. I always take a cleaning rod and brush to the range, some type of ammunition will foul the chambers quickly. A drop of oil on the crane, the ejector rod and the trigger and hammer pivots is all the lube necessary. Make sure there is no oil on the breech face because it can migrate onto the cartidges. A little dab'll do ya. If the gun is going to be put away for long term storage the bore and chambers can have a very light coat of oil/rust preventative applied. Wipe it out thoroughly before firing again. A light coat of oil on all exterior surfaces will keep the finish looking good. Always store it in a container that will not hold and absorb moisture from the air. Never in a holster, gun rug or foam lined case or a case with a rag in it. The hard plastic case that most guns come packed in is fine.

NOLAEMT
June 19, 2010, 10:34 PM
I think thats just guns in general.

Funny story...

When I turned 21 I went with my father to the local gun shop, and picked out a handgun, an HK uspc.45. when asked by my father why i picked such an expensive one, I told him it was all the gun I would ever need, it fit my hand, and I could use if for self defense, at the range, and if i ever wanted i could get my carry permit (at the time i had no idea what that entailed) and carry it.

Silly me, if I only knew at the time.

Publius1688
June 20, 2010, 12:37 AM
You'll love that 686. I'm a 586 man myself, but see the appeal.
Firing DAO is a challenge, no doubt about it. Practice makes perfect. Start reloading, if you haven't already, to cut down on your ammo costs.
And be careful----once the bug bites, it bites hard! Those revolvers tend to multiply.

Sunray
June 20, 2010, 01:07 AM
"...a "dumb" question..." No such thing. The only 'dumb' question is the one not asked.
"...oil on the inside of the chambers..." Absolutely not. Unless you need to store it for a few months. Clean and bone dry for shooting.
"...any advice..." Have a trigger job done. Less than $100. $60ish usually. All new firearms need a trigger job due to frivolous U.S. law suits.
A Smith revolver with a good trigger, DA or SA, is a joy to shoot.
Trigger jobs aren't hard to do, but Smiths need one special tool to get the rebound slide assembly out. $20 from Brownell's. Wouldn't buy one for a one time thing though. Easily made by a machinist. Made one, long ago. Suitably bent 3/16"(I think it is) with a wee slot on the end.
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=774/Product/S_W_REBOUND_SLIDE_SPRING_TOOL

ArchAngelCD
June 20, 2010, 01:20 AM
I love the gun, even if shooting a double action revolver takes some getting used to. if anyone has any advice id love to hear it.
Two words, Snap Caps... You can practice your trigger trigger control all night long for free. The added benefits, your trigger finger gets stronger and your trigger gets smoother from use. It's a win-win all around. You will quickly see what you're doing wrong because there's no recoil to mask the problems. You can fix any trigger pull problems quickly and them practice correctly. I still use snap caps when the weather is bad and I can't get out to shoot.

gwnorth
June 20, 2010, 08:16 AM
At most, when you clean each chamber, follow with a patch lightly oiled and then follow that with a dry patch, just enough oil to form an invisible film that will prevent corrosion during storage.

I do this. After each shoot, when I clean the gun, I do lightly oil each chamber along with the barrel. Then run a dry patch through them so there is only a very light coating left. That will stop any corrosion, and I've also found that it makes cleaning after shooting .38spl in my .357s a breeze as the fouling just comes right out with a couple of brush strokes. Been doing this for years - just don't leave the chambers dripping with oil or anything like that. And certainly do not "freshly" oil them before shooting (I usually run another dry patch down the chambers and barrel when I take the gun out next time before shooting it).

Brian Williams
June 20, 2010, 09:25 AM
Having trouble with the trigger, don't waste any money on a trigger job until you have shot it at least 200 to 500 rounds and if it is still hard or gritty, then do something. You can also dryfire the snot out of it, this does 2 things; one, strengthens your finger and two, wears the trigger in.

Oil lightly.

miss lead
June 20, 2010, 10:15 AM
I was told that with our newer revolvers we don't need snap caps - that it won't hurt the gun to dry fire it empty. That is not true?

Drail
June 20, 2010, 11:31 AM
No snap caps are not "necessary" but it makes some people feel better. The exception to this is .22 rimfire firearms. Even though it doesn not harm modern designs (like Rugers) it's a good idea to place an empty case in the chamber and let the firing pin strike that instead of the chamber's edge. An awful lot of older .22 guns have been damaged by not using an empty case or a snap cap.

MrBorland
June 20, 2010, 01:28 PM
I was told that with our newer revolvers we don't need snap caps - that it won't hurt the gun to dry fire it empty. That is not true?


Hoo boy. Lotsa threads on that one, still with no clear consensus.

My new-ish 686 has tens of thousands of dry fire trigger pulls on it sans snap caps. Couldn't be bothered, and it doesn't seem to be any worse for it.

OTOH, my Model 65, with a hammer-mounted firing pin, has the smoothest factory action this trigger snob's ever felt. It's a rare gem. I rarely dry fire it, but when I do, I use snap caps or some kind of dummy round.

I love the gun, even if shooting a double action revolver takes some getting used to. if anyone has any advice id love to hear it.

Two words, Snap Caps... You can practice your trigger trigger control all night long for free. The added benefits, your trigger finger gets stronger and your trigger gets smoother from use. It's a win-win all around. You will quickly see what you're doing wrong because there's no recoil to mask the problems. You can fix any trigger pull problems quickly and them practice correctly. I still use snap caps when the weather is bad and I can't get out to shoot.

The advice to dry fire to improve one's trigger pull is spot-on, IMHO, but be sure it's quality dry fire. Carefully watch the front sight and note any movement of the sight alignment through the trigger pull, especially the instant the trigger breaks.

ArchAngelCD
June 20, 2010, 08:33 PM
I was told that with our newer revolvers we don't need snap caps - that it won't hurt the gun to dry fire it empty. That is not true?
That's true to a point. If you are going to pull the trigger a few times you don't need snap caps but if you are going to pull the trigger 500X then why push the issue? All those trigger pulls can't be good for the parts and snap caps are a cheap insurance policy against damage.

Drail
June 20, 2010, 10:00 PM
Dry firing a centerfire S&W revolver does not damage any of the parts in the gun. If a firing pin breaks it's not because you were dry firing it, it was either out of alignment or left the factory with a material defect or poor heat treat. I have worked on and dry fired S&W revolvers for many years and never seen one break from the dry firing.

ArchAngelCD
June 22, 2010, 03:21 AM
I'm sorry to disagree Drail, snap caps aren't a bad idea when doing extensive dry firing practice. All the "experts" recommend snap caps, what's the big deal about protecting your handgun?

miss lead
June 22, 2010, 08:38 AM
Think I'll get a set. They're cheap.

ArchAngelCD
June 22, 2010, 11:22 AM
I've found Tipton (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=780089) snap caps to be the best for the price. There are others in the $20 range but that's a bit expensive.

rswartsell
June 22, 2010, 03:13 PM
Just a differing opinion but I only buy A-Zoom snap caps. They are far more durable and over time it costs me less to buy the A-Zooms rather than keep replacing the Tiptons.

miss lead
June 22, 2010, 03:36 PM
I did notice that a number of the reviews on the Tiptons mentioned their breaking.

Bexar
June 22, 2010, 03:36 PM
Just some thoughts...the 686 is a stainless steel revolver. Wouldn't it be fine with no oil? Light weight oil is the nemesis of primers. I would hate to hear a click instead of a boom in a nut cuttin dance.

Also, wouldn't a thin layer of oil carbonize pretty quick and mix with burned residue and then your original intent is defeated.

I don't like oil anywhere near the cartridges and prefer a light dusting of graphite where needed.

By the way...what load are you shooting in that 686? That's what I have beside my bed in the 4 inch barrel.

Thanks,

Bexar

Drail
June 22, 2010, 06:11 PM
It would be fine with no oil as long as human hands never touched it. I have seen shooters whose sweat was so corrosive they could handle your stainless gun for a couple of minutes and cause rust. A thin film of oil is a good idea. Graphite offer no protection from corrosion. Just check the breechface and wipe it dry if it looks oily. Just place a couple of drops on a rag and wipe down the exterior of the gun. (with cylinder closed) Archangel, on a centerfire S&W revolver the snaps caps are not accomplishing or protecting anything. The hammer face is striking the frame and the firing pin is not hitting anything. If it makes you feel better to use snap caps, be my guest, but it really isn't necessary. If you don't want to buy snap caps use empty cases. I have worked on and built competition revolvers for a long time and never used them and never broke a S&W. And I dry fired them thousands of time on my bench. S&W will tell you the same. Just don't dry fire rimfires.

RyanM
June 23, 2010, 04:48 PM
Also, make sure you keep the area underneath the ejector star free of oil and dirt. Buildup under there can completely keep the gun from functioning.

ArchAngelCD
June 23, 2010, 10:48 PM
Remember, I said they were the best "for the price". If you can swing the price for the better snap caps they will perform better and last longer too.

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