Dry firing G17


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Acal
June 22, 2010, 10:00 PM
Since I just got my Glock, I can't stop holding it around the house. I carry it around unloaded just feeling it in my hands. But a question... is it okay to dry fire it? (I'm assuming "dry fire" is the right term... i.e. no bullets or mag, cock the gun and pull trigger)

I don't do it all the time but once in awhile I get the urge to inspect the chamber and dry fire it a bit. Am I damaging it??

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nalioth
June 22, 2010, 10:01 PM
Dry fire it until your finger cramps, you won't hurt it.

Acal
June 22, 2010, 10:03 PM
Thx! Puts my mind at ease...

W.E.G.
June 22, 2010, 10:08 PM
You can't be serious.

Surely, you have seen this.
http://www.theprepared.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=90

REAPER4206969
June 22, 2010, 10:13 PM
You can dry fire a Glock until your finger goes numb.

VA27
June 22, 2010, 10:16 PM
A little story on dry firing Glocks: A person I know (let's call him Jim) acquired one of the very first G19s. His job as a state agent required him to travel extensively. To relieve the boredom of long trips he would dry fire that G19.

The firing pin broke, so he called Glock and told 'em he'd broken the firing pin while dry firing. Glock informed him that you can't break a firing pin by dry firing, but they sent him a new firing pin.

Several months later, same thing, same answer from Glock and a new firing pin.

Several months later, same thing. This time the Glock rep told him that they had put a Glock on a machine and that it took over 250,000 dry fires to break a Glock firing pin.

His answer? "Yup, that sounds about right."

Dry fire away, you won't hurt it.

The Lone Haranguer
June 22, 2010, 10:26 PM
I would grow bored with it long before it hurt the gun. :p

Acal
June 22, 2010, 10:35 PM
You can't be serious.

Surely, you have seen this.
http://www.theprepared.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=90


HOLY!!

Ben86
June 22, 2010, 11:37 PM
It should not hurt anything. I personally still prefer to use snap caps in mine (A-Zoom). I don't want to prematurely wear out the firing pin spring, or cause whatever imaginary wear I can think of. It also just sounds so horrible when it hits an empty chamber, I just can't take it I love my guns too much. :)

Strahley
June 23, 2010, 12:10 AM
You'll break a nail before breaking something in the Glock by dry firing it

DustyVermonter
June 23, 2010, 03:03 AM
In order to take the gun apart for cleaning you must dryfire it. Not only can you dry fire it you can run it over with a bulldozer, throw it off a cliff, bury it for ten years.....well, you get the picture. I defy you to hurt that gun, if you do I will buy you a new one. VA27, what was the deal with jims glock?

Armedleprechaun
June 23, 2010, 05:00 AM
It'll be fine. You have to pull the trigger to field strip it anyway. I have a Glock 19 and love it!! I've dry fired mine quite a bit and it's fine. For sustained dry fire practice you may want to get snap caps though. Enjoy your new Glock!!

Evan

Radagast
June 23, 2010, 05:23 AM
Acal:
My Glock 17 has had over 20,000 rounds through it in the last 9 or so years, so that probably equates to 50,000 dry fires. I chipped the front of the firing pin at around 10,000 rounds, but it still shoots fine, replaced the recoil spring at 7,000 rounds (didn't need to), changed the sights out for Heinie Straight Eights (halved my group sizes) and installed a 3.5 pound connector (5.5 pound trigger pull as a result).

The only thing lots of dry fire will do is smooth out the trigger pull.

harmon rabb
June 23, 2010, 07:57 AM
Lol. Dry fire it until you're bored and your finger is numb.

possum
June 23, 2010, 09:35 AM
you won't hurt it all. i shoot about 30,000rds a year and do at least that many dry fires on my guns a year, if not more.

Damon555
June 23, 2010, 11:14 AM
The owners manual states that the weapon must be dry fired in order to field strip it......It is not harmful to a Glock to dry fire it.

Girodin
June 23, 2010, 12:58 PM
It's obvious you didn't read the owners manual. It states that you need to dry fire it to field strip the pistol.

Please read the manual until you understand it.

A reasonable person could wonder if there was difference between repeatedly dry firing and doing it only when the gun is broken down. No need to act like a jerk.

Damon555
June 23, 2010, 03:19 PM
A reasonable person could wonder if there was difference between repeatedly dry firing and doing it only when the gun is broken down. No need to act like a jerk.
My apologies, you are correct. I neglected to consider that aspect.

Zack
June 23, 2010, 03:27 PM
You can't be serious.

Surely, you have seen this.
http://www.theprepared.com/index.php...ask=view&id=90

He droped it from a plane?! That is insane.


Is dry fire when the gun goes "CLICK" or pulling the trigger? I think its when you hear "CLICK" ????

stchman
June 23, 2010, 03:40 PM
Dry firing any center fire firearm will not harm it. There are some pistols that have a mag disconnect and are not to be dry fired without a mag inserted.

Black Majik
June 23, 2010, 04:32 PM
Dryfire away. Many who compete using a Glock put thousands upon thousands of dryfires on their Glocks. It'll hold up.

TonyT
June 23, 2010, 04:39 PM
Personally, I do not dry fire. I use a 22 conversion unit for my centerfire handguns and a S&W 17 or 617 when practising revolver drills.

basicblur
June 23, 2010, 05:31 PM
Dry firing any center fire firearm will not harm it.
Out of all the guns I have, I think the only one that says donít do it is my Taurus PT145 (2nd Generation).

From page 5, point #22 of my Taurus PT145 owner manual:
SAFETY FIRST: Dry firing is bad for this firearm, whether the hammer block is engaged or not.

Now I donít know if the Taurus is made differently than my name-dropper brands, or whether Taurus is just being more cautious, but I figure why take the chance? I just use a snap cap for extended dry firing practice and donít worry Ďbout it.

The KISS principle donchaknow?

nalioth
June 23, 2010, 05:49 PM
From page 5, point #22 of my Taurus PT145 owner manual:
SAFETY FIRST: Dry firing is bad for this firearm, whether the hammer block is engaged or not. Lawyers are responsible for most of today's gun manual content. The sentence above is company-lawyer-required.

Radagast
June 24, 2010, 01:43 AM
Not all centerfire handguns are safe to dry fire. The Beretta Tomcat may have a broken firing pin with very little dry fire, as I found to my disgust. HK USPs at one time suffered from firing pin breakages, I don't know if this was a result of dryfire or live fire.
TL,DR: follow the manual and use snap caps as a precaution. But the Glock firing pin seems to be indestructable.

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