To bob or not to bob?


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fenriulven
June 25, 2010, 03:33 PM
Wow, haven't been around here for a while! Anyway, I thought I'd pose a little question to the forum. Right now I have a second series Colt Detective special that has turned into my primary carry piece. Not that it's my preferred carry weapon, but it is the one that's on me most of the time (there was an incident with my P3AT, more on that later maybe), and I must confess, I am very fond of the little gun. Honestly, the gun points so well I don't even worry about sights (somehow they always seem to line up on target whether I do my job or not!) and the trigger is so smooth in DA I can't tell a difference in accuracy. In fact it may be the finest trigger pull I've ever encountered. Anyway, I'm considering bobbing the hammer. Mostly I'm thinking about doing this not because it snags very often (although I can see how this might happen in a high stress situation) but the hammer tends to jab me in a rather unpleasant fashion especially when it's just tucked into a waistband or sometimes even in an IWB. Mostly, its gets pocket carried though. What do you guys think? Will the reduced hammer mass be an issue and how will bobbing the hammer effect the gun's value (not that I'm looking to sell, but occasionally I do swap guns if something I really like comes along)? Also how will a spurless hammer affect holster retention? I ask all these questions because all of my revolvers still have their hammers...
Thanks everyone - Brian

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Zundfolge
June 25, 2010, 04:12 PM
The only reason to bob is for pocket carry ... if you're carrying in the pocket than by all means bob (its not like you can't find a replacement hammer if you ever want to go back).

Guillermo
June 25, 2010, 04:28 PM
if you bob make it DAO

the reason for this is that if it were to be cocked, having no hammer spur there is no safe way to drop the hammer

fenriulven
June 25, 2010, 06:31 PM
To decock Colts of that era, you can swing out the cylinder and dry fire...

Guillermo
June 25, 2010, 07:55 PM
you can swing out the cylinder and dry fire

nope

fenriulven
June 25, 2010, 08:28 PM
Uh, yes you can. Its right in front of me. I've had the gun for years, I think I know how it functions. Every other one I've had functions in exactly the same manner. If you don't know what you're talking about, please dont annoy the rest of us.

fenriulven
June 25, 2010, 08:35 PM
To clarify: if the hammer is at full cock and for whatever reason it is impossible to lower the hammer slowly (e.g. no hammer spur) all you have to do is swing out the cylinder and pull the trigger. Very simple, very safe for you and the gun.

Guillermo
June 25, 2010, 08:37 PM
your gun is broken

I own several colts including a Detective Special identical to the OP's and none will open when the gun is cocked

Old Fuff
June 25, 2010, 09:57 PM
In a Colt double-action revolver with 1908 era lockwork, which includes the D-frame Detective Special and Cobra models, the sideplate and hand that rotates the cylinder are both on the left-hand side. The cylinder ratchet is to the right of the hand. When the revolver is fully cocked the hand is extended into the frames window with the front and right side pressing against the ratchet and one of its teeth.

Since to open the cylinder requires the cylinder to rotate out to the left, the extended hand should block this movement. In addition the hammer block should be positioned so that when that hammer is at full-cock the cylinder latch (thumbpiece) cannot be drawn backwards far enough to release the cylinder.

Not having inspected fenriulven's revolver I cannot say what he can or can't do, but I will say that for the reasons explained above he shouldn't be able to do what he says he does.

I fully agree with Guillermo that revolvers that have bobbed hammers should be modified to DAO for safety reasons.

For sake of argument, if you cannot open the cylinder when a bobbed hammer is cocked, and slip while lowering it, you are going to be in a world of hurt. :uhoh:

Lucky Derby
June 25, 2010, 10:03 PM
I have seen an accessory for these old Colts that covers the hammer so as to prevent snagging and yet sill allow cocking. Basically making it similar to The S&W bodyguard models. I would try to find one for your revolver, rather than bobbing the hammer.

Drail
June 25, 2010, 10:52 PM
What I have always done is find another hammer for your model and bob it. Then you can always go back. I don't feel it's really necessary to render the gun DAO just because you bobbed the hammer, just make sure you understand that thumb cocking and decocking is no longer an option and don't even think of doing it. I know guys that can do it and never have an unintentional bang but there's really no reason to ever do it. Learning to shoot a revolver in DA all of the time will make you a much better shooter.

Nushif
June 25, 2010, 11:06 PM
I am really fond of bobbed and DAO snubbies, so my vote will usually be to do exactly that.

Service Revolvers are a totally different story, of course, but the Detective Special ... love that snubby.

Guillermo
June 26, 2010, 12:05 AM
Old Fuff saidI fully agree with Guillermo

THIS IS A RED LETTER DAY!!!!

Oyeboten
June 26, 2010, 12:52 AM
De-Cocking a Bobbed Hammer Revolver, is a forthright, rational maneuver, requiring only some basic understanding of the Mechanism, and, basic dexterity.

At worst, lacking these, all a person has to do is jam a finger end between Hammer and Frame, pull the Trigger, release the Trigger as the Hammer will then be pressing against one's finger end...and, then, with the Hammer barely 1/2 inch from the Frame, finger off of Trigger, gently pull your finger end 'out' from the Hammer's press, and all is well.


This of course lacks all dignity and style, or, would be it's own amusing style...but, if that is all one can manage, then at least it is something.


If a person is too uncoordinated or confused to do THAT, probably they should not be carrying anything anyway.

Or, a simple way to save face if lacking the ability to manage the maneuver, would be for a person having a Bobbed Hammer Revolver, to simply elect NOT to 'Cock' it, if they wish to avoid what for them would be the embarassment of then not being able to let the Hammer 'down' safely.


So...if it is a worry, just don't Cock the Double Action Revolver for putting it into the 'Single Action' mode!


How hard is that?


Lol...


Yeeeeesh!


"Practice"


There is nothing difficult about it.

oldfool
June 26, 2010, 03:18 AM
What I have always done is find another hammer for your model and bob it. Then you can always go back. I don't feel it's really necessary to render the gun DAO just because you bobbed the hammer, just make sure you understand that thumb cocking and decocking is no longer an option and don't even think of doing it. I know guys that can do it and never have an unintentional bang but there's really no reason to ever do it. Learning to shoot a revolver in DA all of the time will make you a much better shooter.
"Learning to shoot a revolver in DA all of the time will make you a much better shooter."

no, it won't
it will make you a better DA shooter

The Lone Haranguer
June 26, 2010, 03:51 AM
Other than resale value, I see no harm in at least blunting the sharp corners of the fishhook-shaped hammer.

BCCL
June 26, 2010, 09:46 AM
Uh, yes you can. Its right in front of me. I've had the gun for years, I think I know how it functions. Every other one I've had functions in exactly the same manner. If you don't know what you're talking about, please dont annoy the rest of us.

If it does, your gun is indeed damaged.

Guillermo & Old Fluff are 100% correct, no properly functioning Colt DA revolver should allow the cylinder to open while the hammer is cocked.

Just sat here and tried it with both a 1955 Agent and 1970 Python.

Yo Mama
June 26, 2010, 11:01 AM
If you don't know what you're talking about, please dont annoy the rest of us.

Let's learn from this experience. ;) Best to be polite to the members that have been here a bit longer than yourself. That way you don't need to apologize,.....which you should.

Guillermo
June 26, 2010, 11:16 AM
Oye said just don't Cock the Double Action Revolver for putting it into the 'Single Action' mode

And he is exactly right.

I am not a "bobbed" guy as I don't pocket carry. If I did have a de-spurred Colt I would not DAO it. (I might a Smith due to the simplicity thereof)

Hypocrite? No. Like Oyeboten said, I just wouldn't get it into single action mode. But I almost never shoot a snubbie single action and I am the only person that carries my guns.

So if you will allow me to amend my statement...MOST people should render their bobbed hammered revolvers DAO.

A fellow such as (for instance) Old Fuff is experienced and responsible enough to not do so.

Perhaps you will label that arrogance.

ArmedBear
June 26, 2010, 11:24 AM
I pocket carry a Centennial frame, but I also pocket carry a regular Model 60. Snagging has never once been an issue, and the Model 60 actually comes out of the Nemesis better than the Centennial's bigger rear frame.

I'm about as likely to bob that Model 60 as I am to cut my index finger off.

What I'm not sure of is the exact shape of the Colt's hammer, but if it came to my having to bob it to CCW it, I'd just get a J-frame Airweight and keep the increasingly-collectible Colt in the safe.

Guillermo
June 26, 2010, 11:24 AM
best to be polite to the members that have been here a bit longer than yourself.

Yo Mama,

You are correct that such was uncalled for and not HighRoad. I also applaud your efforts to keep the board what it was designed to be.

I did not take it personally because either he
A- doesn't know what he is talking about
B- is just stirring up "stuff" or
C- has a broken gun.

This means that he
A- needs to learn and flaming is not conducive to learning
B-not worth my time or
C- poor guy has to find a Colt gunsmith and broken guns suck

Besides, we all sometimes type stuff we shouldn't

Fremmer
June 26, 2010, 11:50 AM
Don't bob it. Keep the gun stock. Don't try to fix something that isn't broken.

Leave her be! :D

Old Fuff
June 26, 2010, 11:58 AM
fenriulven:

After re-reading the thread I find that we may be looking at two different issues here...

1. Can you open the cylinder (while the hammer is forward in the rebounded position) and then dry fire a Colt revolver? Yes you can.

2. Can you open the cylinder when the hammer is cocked? No, or at least you shouldn't be able to.

An exception to this were some early Colt hand-ejector revolvers made before 1908, because the sideplate and hand were on the right side of the frame, and they did not have a positive hammer block. However I don't see any relationship between these, and the ones under discussion.

It is obvious that if one wants to they can shoot a revolver with an intact hammer spur exclusively in the double-action mode, and some do. But his misses the core point. The main reason for bobbing a hammer is usually to insure that the spur won't snag on something when the gun is carried concealed under, or within some garment. Another reason (which may or may not be important, but should be considered) is that it will prevent any question following a justifiable shooting concerning the possibility that you unintentionally shot someone while covering them with a "hair trigger" cocked handgun.

Concerning the question of leaving the single-action feature in a bobed-hammer revolver. I am sure that Oyeboten and I will continue to "agree to disagree" about the practice, but I have been involved in several cases where individuals that didn't remove the single-action mode came to wish they had. They were all suposedly experienced and competent gun handlers.

Old Fuff
June 26, 2010, 12:16 PM
Concerning the Colt Detective Special and similar D-frame revolvers, I might mention that in past years several custom gunsmiths that specialized in Colt's would sometimes modify the lockwork to get a noticeable improvement in the double-action pull, but this modification required the elemination of the single-action option.

A common issue with all single-action / double-action revolvers is that when you have both, the double-action feature is considered to be optional, and is not optimal. There has been a lot of discussion lately about the much improved D.A. trigger pull in Ruger's new LCR line, and the reason is that it was designed from git-go to be a DAO.

Rexster
June 26, 2010, 06:57 PM
I have certainly de-cocked spur-less revolvers, in dry practice, for the sake of making sure I knew how. The support hand's thumb and index finger grasps the hammer from behind, so that the index fingertip and tip of the thumb are touching. Then, the firing hand pulls the trigger, the hammer is allowed to move forward a fraction of an inch, then the trigger finger release the trigger. Then, the support hand releases the hammer, which then stops in a safe position. This is actually, also, the safest way to de-cock a DA revolver that does have a spur.

Other than this dry exercise, I haven't cocked my two cock-able spur-less revolvers, both Rugers, which used to be made that way. Cocking them is not street-relevant, and I have revolvers with spurs if I want to hunt or plink in SA mode.

As for the original question, I would recommend that ONLY a gunsmith VERY experienced with the older Colts be allowed to touch the weapon. The dynamics of the Colts are different from Ruger and S&W revolvers. Anyone with a dremel can remove a spur.

Personally, I would not remove the spur of this now-historic weapon, but instead, use a holster that protected me from the hammer, and the weapon from my perspiration. My old, now-discontinued Eagle Industries IWB holsters did this; certainly something similar exists today.

Once the spur is gone, it is gone. Replacement parts for these Colts are not being made, and the parts now extant are becoming harder to find.

Oyeboten
June 26, 2010, 07:15 PM
Something I have always wanted to do, but, have not done yet...is to have a small rasied area added to the Bobbed Hammer top rear, or onto the rear but sticling up a little above the top proper, added by welding a compatible Steel Alloy, at the rear of course of the Hammer top.

This then to be gracefully shaped, and, checkered....allowing a nicer purchase for one's Thumb tip pad, for cocking or de-cocking a Spurrless Hammer on a Revolver.

If no checkering or Serration is present on an otherwise plain Bobbed Hammer top, it can be a little slippery, especiaally if one's hands have perspiration or if one was in the middle of a Fried Chicken Dinner, or changing out a Transmisson on an old Car or something, when finding a need to cock or de-cock.

Otherwise, if a person can cock or de-cock a Spurr Hammer, they can also cock or de-cock a Spurless one, even if needing to pull back on the Trigger slightly to get the Hammer back enough to get their shooting Hand Thumb tip pad onto the Hammer top, to cock it.

De-cocking is the same whether the Hammer is Bobbed or not, and it is merely a difference of one's shooting Hand Thumb tip pad electing the top of the Hammer, for a Bobbed Hammer, instead of electing the Spurr, of a normal Spurred Hammer, to de-cock, or let down.

rainbowbob
June 26, 2010, 07:54 PM
If you don't know what you're talking about, please dont annoy the rest of us.


Well...I suppose that is good advice and perhaps should be taken under advisement by the OP who wrote it. I wonder where he went?

If ANYBODY here knows about revolvers, I'd have to say Guillermo and Old Fuff are two of the most knowledgeable from what I've read over the years.

Guillermo
June 26, 2010, 08:02 PM
If ANYBODY here knows about revolvers, I'd have to say Guillermo and Old Fuff are two of the most knowledgeable from what I've read over the years.

Nice of you to say Bob but I can't carry Fuff's inside-the-waistband holster :D

rainbowbob
June 26, 2010, 08:08 PM
I can't carry Fuff's inside-the-waistband holster...


Probably nobody can.

But there a few who can at least be mentioned in the same paragraph, and your're one of them in my book.

Guillermo
June 26, 2010, 08:17 PM
But there a few who can at least be mentioned in the same paragraph, and your're one of them in my book

I am truly honored

chicharrones
June 26, 2010, 08:56 PM
Personally, I would not remove the spur of this now-historic weapon, but instead, use a holster that protected me from the hammer, and the weapon from my perspiration. My old, now-discontinued Eagle Industries IWB holsters did this; certainly something similar exists today.

Once the spur is gone, it is gone. Replacement parts for these Colts are not being made, and the parts now extant are becoming harder to find.


I agree, if it weren't a Colt I'd bob the spur.

------------------------------------------

I've bobbed the hammer on a different brand pocket carry revolver myself. I did not make it DAO for the same reasons many here state. The only place I've thumb cocked this revolver on a live round is at the range. You can either fire it or decock it. Modern revolvers have transfer bars or hammer blocks which can make this a tad less worrisome. Practice to get your finger off the trigger as soon as the hammer is freed. All other firearm safety rules apply.

The Lone Haranguer
June 27, 2010, 07:11 AM
I have seen an accessory for these old Colts that covers the hammer so as to prevent snagging and yet sill allow cocking.
This is a hammer shroud, a factory option, or (if still made) an aftermarket accessory (from W. Waller & Son). It does work, but the frame must be drilled and tapped to install it and removing it will leave the holes exposed, although you could put filler screws in them. Also, if you take a high enough grip to control the revolver in rapid fire, the lower edge of the shroud will beat your hand up.

kdave21
July 3, 2010, 09:50 PM
I have a simple solution, if its just because it hammer is jabbing you in the side, why not buy a holster that prevents this? I just bought a Bianchi 3S Pistol Pocket which has a thumb snap on it. The hammer is completely covered, no gouging. I have only had it for about a week (am wearing it now). The holster has some pros and cons, but gouging is not one of them. I am thinking about writing a review of it on here somewhere since it is so hard to find feedback on lesser used holsters...

kdave21
July 3, 2010, 09:53 PM
I see that Rexster may have already suggested this solution...well I just wanted to hear myself talk I guess. Pay no attention to me.

Oyeboten
July 3, 2010, 10:03 PM
I think if the reasons for having a Bobbed Hammer are not immediately obvious, then, just don't do it, don't Bob it.

If someday you snag, then, revisit the matter 'then'...

Easy enough...

Old Fuff
July 4, 2010, 11:18 AM
If someday you snag, then, revisit the matter 'then'...

Well yes, I suppose... That is if you are still able to revisit the matter. :uhoh:

Oyeboten
July 4, 2010, 02:21 PM
Well, possibly a far better instruction then, than all the admonishions or advocations which are perfunctorily rejected before hand...

"You can lead a Horse to Water..."

But untill they are in fact 'thirsty', they probably will not drink it...

Lol...

doc540
July 4, 2010, 02:50 PM
Since mine is a SD tool and not a collectible, I had it bobbed.

When done right it does nothing but add utility and safety to the piece. Never had a light strike, and I've had four D frames bobbed.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/Colt%20Cobra%202/DSCN0967-1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/Colt%20Agent%201969/DSCN1034-1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/Colt%20Detective%20Special/ColtCobra012-1.jpg



A forum member here does that work.

PM me if you're interested.

snooperman
July 4, 2010, 07:44 PM
If you use the right kind of pocket holster and use your thumb over the hammer when you draw , it will not snag. I have several Colts but I do not pocket carry, as I use the IWB holster. But like Guiellmo stated , and I agree, if you bob make it DAO. That said, think about it before you "BOB", a fine old Colt.

doc540
July 4, 2010, 09:27 PM
All my bobbed Colts work perfectly using single action.

earlthegoat2
July 4, 2010, 09:42 PM
If you use the right kind of pocket holster and use your thumb over the hammer when you draw , it will not snag.

This is true but....

I thought I had trained myself to draw from the pocket with my thumb covering the hammer. I practiced it a great deal. Proper pocket holster and all.

One night at the league pistol shoot I do at my range they decided to have some fun and have you draw your EDC from where you usually carry it and engage multiple targets.

I got snagged up EVERY time I tried to draw.

This does not prove anything but it does make me believe there is a difference between low stress training and even artificial stress created by a league fun shoot.

I bobbed my hammer after that.

I am only one human but I do believe in taking Murphy out back and beating him with a rubber hose on things I can control.

snooperman
July 4, 2010, 09:55 PM
as stress does strange things to us shooters when we have it. I carry one of my Colt agents often but not in the pocket. I just do not like a gun in my pocket. To each his own.

Old Fuff
July 4, 2010, 11:43 PM
The problem with the thumb covering the hammer during a draw is that it should be around on the left side of the frame, getting a proper grip on the handle. If under stress you get a bad grip around the stocks and backstrap you may not have time, or be able to correct it.

If you draw without covering the hammer spur you can get the esential hold on the handle, but the hammer spur may snag on a covering garment - if there is one.

On something so important it doesn't pay to take chances.

snooperman
July 5, 2010, 08:47 AM
I can see your point about the grip being compromised. I have never liked pocket carry, but for those who do, your point is well taken. This is a good discussion and shows how personal the carry mode can be for each person. For me it is IWB.

chicharrones
July 5, 2010, 11:32 AM
This is true but....
I thought I had trained myself to draw from the pocket with my thumb covering the hammer. I practiced it a great deal. Proper pocket holster and all.

I practiced the thumb covering and even thumb in line with the spur, too. If I had to put a number on it, my snag rate in quick draw from the pocket was 5% - 10%. That is why I bobbed the hammer on my one and only snubby.

Old Fuff
July 5, 2010, 11:52 AM
Pocket carry is not for everyone, as it has both advantages and disadvantages. I’m looking at the issues from a perspective of a civilian, casual, CCW person.

First the pluses: You don’t need a covering garment, and you can stand with your hand on the gun, ready to draw, without brandishing or giving away the fact you are armed. Under these circumstances, no draw is faster. You can also pocket or remove the holstered gun without having to unsnap or otherwise “unhook” a holster, which to say the least is effortless.

On the negative side, you are usually limited to a small handgun for obvious reasons, and you lose the use of a pocket for other purposes. If your occupation requires going after and apprehending potentially violent people, or you’re in an environment that has a higher then normal serious trouble factor, more firepower and a larger handgun may be prudent.

But most of the times I’m not faced with these considerations, and I’d bet that most civilians with a license to pack heat aren’t either. Given my lifestyle a snubby in the pocket will provide all the personal protection I need.

snooperman
July 5, 2010, 03:39 PM
keep me from pocket carry that you failed to mention. When I am seated , especially in a car with my seat belt on , it is difficult for me to draw the gun. I can do it but it takes too much time and effort. Also , when seated in a restaurant etc , It would take too much time as well. I am sure you do not have this problem "old fuff" but many people do. Body build has something to do with this as well as comfort. This is why I like a IWB holster for most of my carry needs. Plus , I like to carry my Colt magnum carry and it is too heavy for pocket. Even with my Colt Agent I prefer IWB. I have a bobbed hammer on my Magnum carry and at 21 oz it is easy to carry IWB. That said , your points are well taken but suffice to say that each person has to weigh the positives and negatives for CCW for themselves . I find each method of carry has its drawbacks too. None are perfect and at age 70 I have tried them all. My brother-in-law likes "Pocket carry" but he is much younger with a different body height and mass than me. Sorry to have rambled so much.

Cosmoline
July 5, 2010, 03:59 PM
I have seen an accessory for these old Colts that covers the hammer so as to prevent snagging and yet sill allow cocking. Basically making it similar to The S&W bodyguard models. I would try to find one for your revolver, rather than bobbing the hammer.

It's a hammer shroud, and it maintains all the benefits of the full hammer without the snags. Very classy looking, too.

jeepmor
July 5, 2010, 04:26 PM
That cobra sure looks nice doc. I'd vote for bobbing the hammer if the gun is not a collectible.

Old Fuff
July 5, 2010, 10:38 PM
When I am seated , especially in a car with my seat belt on , it is difficult for me to draw the gun. I can do it but it takes too much time and effort.

I thought of that, about a half-hour after I submitted my post... :uhoh:

I also make extensive use of IWB holsters when a covering garment is practical, or I what to carry something larger then a pocket gun. In my mini-van I sometimes stanch a piece in the map pocket built in front driver's seat. Reach between my legs and it's good to go.

As a very senior citizen I am probably most vulnerable in a big-box parking lot where I appear to be an easy target to a mugger or car-jacker. Even so the possibility or probability of being hit is very small.

Too many folks in Arizona carry guns… :D

rainbowbob
July 6, 2010, 04:43 AM
I carry in the left jacket pocket for cross-draw when driving...except when it's too hot for a jacket. I like the idea of using the map pocket.

Oyeboten
July 6, 2010, 04:44 AM
Just elect Trousers which have larger front Pockets and or which are also cut a little more ample about that region...and then accessing a J-Frame Snubby, or even a K-Frame Snubby, in 'Pocket Carry', is greatly easier when seated, driving, at a restaurant, or whatever.

I just tried it now, sitting here...


Easy as Pie...

snooperman
July 6, 2010, 09:12 AM
I never liked a gun in my pocket, whether pants are larger , makes no difference to me. Another carry mode I like depending on dress attire is the small Belt pak that my wife made of heavy denim with an internal velcro closure. Also very quick access. To each his own.

snooperman
July 6, 2010, 10:22 AM
I had to have one. I put the little "D" frame Agent away and for the most part went with the 21 oz 357 magnum. In my Mika cross-draw IWB holster it is what I was always looking for in a carry gun. It is not perfect, as no gun is, but as Ed Lovette said in his book "THE Snubby Revolver" "It is bad to the bone". I wish Colt would bring it back as it is one slick little powerhouse.

Old Fuff
July 6, 2010, 11:28 AM
Map Pockets:

Hopefully no one will simply drop a handgun into a seat-mounted map pocket. If you do you may have trouble finding it in an emergency.

Depending on how it's constructed, cut a piece of cardboard to fit it, and then use that as a pattern to cut out a thin but rigid panel. Metal, wall paneling, plastic, whatever.

Then use adhesive backed Velcro to attach a holster, and inexpensive nylon ones work fine.

Oh, and when you park the car, leaving a gun in the pocket isn't the best of ideas, because it's one of the first places someone will look if they break in while you're gone.

If you are involved in a traffic stop, tell the officer where the gun is, and don't make any moves toward it unless instructed to do so. If they discover the gun on his/her own you may be in for a difficult time...

snooperman
July 6, 2010, 01:51 PM
I have seen and heard of other ways for "in-the-car modes while driving , but I like yours. It is simple and easy to make and access when needed.

Old Fuff
July 6, 2010, 02:04 PM
My bill is in the mail... :what: :evil: :D

SwampWolf
July 25, 2010, 03:51 PM
I've pocket carried (with suitable pocket holster) a non-bobbed nor shrouded Colt Cobra for many years and have never had it snag on a draw nor is my grip compromised in any way once the revolver "clears denim". I toted the revolver off-duty this way for many years and have continued to do so following my retirement. The secret for a snagless draw from a pocket with an unbobbed revolver is to draw it with the ball of the thumb covering the spur of the hammer and much practice. I've read the other posts that argue a "stressed" draw is different than an "unstressed" one but that hasn't been my experience. Good training should translate into performing as well under stress as you do in practice.

All that said, I suppose there is no downside to carrying a bobbed/da only revolver in the pocket-except I like the idea of having the option to fire even a snubbed-nose revolver in single-action mode should the admittedly rare self-defense scenario ever present itself.

Regen
July 25, 2010, 05:07 PM
When I am seated , especially in a car with my seat belt on , it is difficult for me to draw the gun.
I often pocket carry my J Frame, but when in the car I have the same issue. To solve it, I take the pocket holster out of my pocket when getting into my car and put it into the driver side cup holder which holds the holster quite snugly and give me a perfect position to get the gun while seated in case of carjacking, etc...

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