What are the Top 5 Problem for a 1911


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Brad5192
June 28, 2010, 08:12 AM
What are the top 5 problem you will have with a 1911?

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gbw
June 28, 2010, 09:11 AM
From some experience, and assuming a quality manufacturer,

#'s 1-3: People messing with them

#4: Magazines

#5: Ammunition

Not to say there aren't other problems, there can be other problems and they show up occasionally, not more so than any other well built pistol.

FLAvalanche
June 28, 2010, 11:34 AM
From some experience, and assuming a quality manufacturer,

#'s 1-3: People messing with them

#4: Magazines

#5: Ammunition

Not to say there aren't other problems, there can be other problems and they show up occasionally, not more so than any other well built pistol.
Reply of the century...

loadedround
June 28, 2010, 11:48 AM
I was not aware of any problems with the 1911 with the exception of the current prices. :)

barnett
June 28, 2010, 11:51 AM
Biggest problem I see, is that now that folks in Chicago can buy them, the price will prolly go up!

1KPerDay
June 28, 2010, 11:56 AM
1. Not enough ammo
2. Not enough time to shoot
3. People want to borrow it
4. Sense of superiority
5. Makes you want to buy more 1911s.

:D

rellascout
June 28, 2010, 12:09 PM
None if you do not Bubba the gun my modifying it without the proper skill and knowledge.

Mags sometimes can be an issue but for the most part if you are sticking to brands like Wilson, Chip McCormick, Metalform, Colt, Mecgar etc.... you will be fine.

Fremmer
June 28, 2010, 12:56 PM
I'll try.

1. Small parts prone to breaking: Lots of small parts in the 1911, and some of them will break (slide release lever, etc.).
2. FTF last round, sometimes caused by mag problem (hence the dimpled follower or paying $35.00 for a super dooper mag).
3. Lack of ammo capacity. You're limited to 8 (or 7 if you don't trust 8 round mags) rounds.
4. Pinching the hell out of your hand when you slap that mag into place. Padded base plates on the mag will help, but won't look as good.
5. The sights aren't so good on the GI models.

That's the best I can come up with. But every type of pistol can, and will, have its own problems.

Edited to add: and full-length guide rods make re-assembly a pain without a special tool.

Canuck-IL
June 28, 2010, 01:10 PM
1. Manufacturers who veer too far from established specs
2. Newbies 'improving' the gun
3. Poor quality reloads
4. Lack of basic maintenance, mags included (springs are a consumable item)
5. Cheap mags

I disagree re too many small parts - the model is one of the absolute simplest to strip and reassemble; quality parts, not always the cheapest, are not prone to breakage.
/Bryan

jem375
June 28, 2010, 01:18 PM
If there were 5 problems with the 1911's, no one would buy them:)

Vern Humphrey
June 28, 2010, 01:42 PM
My experience:

1. Bubbaized guns -- people who don't know what they're doing messing with them.

2. Quality control -- the patents are all long expired and the gun is popular. Everyone and his dog produces M1911s, and the dog has poor quality control.

3. Magazines -- the dog makes magazines, too.

4. Ammunition. A lot of bullets, including many cast bullets, were not properly designed for the M1911, or were designed by people who didn't understand the M1911. A lot of lousy handloads have been shot in M1911s, too.

5. Poor or sloppy aftermarket (and sometimes OEM) parts -- extractors that "clock," rough or inadequate ramping and throating, sloppy firing pin stops, and so on.

ghitch75
June 28, 2010, 02:19 PM
1911'S are a sickness....only problem i have..

Yo Mama
June 28, 2010, 02:30 PM
I'll try.

1. Small parts prone to breaking: Lots of small parts in the 1911, and some of them will break (slide release lever, etc.).
2. FTF last round, sometimes caused by mag problem (hence the dimpled follower or paying $35.00 for a super dooper mag).
3. Lack of ammo capacity. You're limited to 8 (or 7 if you don't trust 8 round mags) rounds.
4. Pinching the hell out of your hand when you slap that mag into place. Padded base plates on the mag will help, but won't look as good.
5. The sights aren't so good on the GI models.


Good try but.....:
1. A slide release is not a small part, and if you get a good one they will never break.
2. Any gun can FTF last round.
3. Dude, if you need more than 8 rounds, plus a reload, your first bet is to get a bigger gun, or some shooting lessons.
4. I've done that once, it's all it took. :cool:
5. But worked fine for the GIs that used them.

Brad5192
June 28, 2010, 02:52 PM
So would one be crazy to trade his Glock 21sf for a 1911???

Ratdog68
June 28, 2010, 02:58 PM
1. Not enough of them in my possession
2. Unfair sex appeal advantage over other platforms
3. Just their mere presence/mention evokes jealous rants from others
4. Ammo is spendy
5. Not enough of them in my possession.

:evil: :neener:

Ratdog68
June 28, 2010, 02:59 PM
So would one be crazy to trade his Glock 21sf for a 1911???
Had this dislexia problem long? :D

Brad5192
June 28, 2010, 03:07 PM
WHAT!!!!

Lone_Gunman
June 28, 2010, 03:10 PM
#'s 1-3: People messing with them

I will agree with you, if by "people" you are including all the employees at Kimber.

ghitch75
June 28, 2010, 03:14 PM
So would one be crazy to trade his Glock 21sf for a 1911???

have you traded yet?

1KPerDay
June 28, 2010, 03:20 PM
So would one be crazy to trade his Glock 21sf for a 1911???
Depends on which 1911. ;)

Brad5192
June 28, 2010, 03:28 PM
No I have not traded yet.

trekgod3
June 28, 2010, 03:36 PM
Keep the Glock! It's lighter and holds more rounds:)

ghitch75
June 28, 2010, 03:39 PM
i wouldn't trade a run over by a semi 25 times for llama 1911 for a Glock!!!!

yongxingfreesty
June 28, 2010, 03:41 PM
where is that funny 1911 picture when you need it? the one about keeping gunsmiths employed and job security?

wojownik
June 28, 2010, 03:42 PM
issues with magazines - my Springfield mag were doo-doo, and replaced those. On the other hand, I'm still using the Colt mags my Colt 1991A1 came with a decade ago.
feed ramp (depending on vendor - I had to have mine polished on a NIB Springfield, but my Colt has worked flawlessly right out of the box.)
occasional extractor problems (not that that doesn't happen to other pistols as well - and it's never happened to me personally).
not as easy to re-assemble for some folks after field strip (OK, yeah, I'll admit to be being clumsy and leaving idiot marks...)
not much else worth noting - the 1911 is a truly solid design. Just go with a good manufacturer, and that should minimize most potential issues with any firearm.


Pretty minor issues all in all for a reliable time- and combat-tested platform. I have three 1911s (Colt, Springfield and Argentine Sistema Colt), and will soon be in the market for a fourth (either a 1911 or a Sig p245, if I can find one). Maybe the biggest problem is too many options/variants to choose from, but on the other hand, if you want a 1911, you can be sure to find something that tickles your fancy.

I had a Glock once. Not my cup of tea. For me, the best .45 platforms by far have been the 1911A1 and the Sig p220. Plus, for a "full size" pistol, I've found the 1911 to be more concealable and carry-friendly than smaller handguns. As in all things, YMMV.

Strahley
June 28, 2010, 03:49 PM
1. Cost
2. Weight/magazine capacity ratio
3. JHP feeding issues
4. Unnecessary grip safety
5. Loose fitting "custom" parts


FLAME SUIT ON :neener:

Brad5192
June 28, 2010, 03:52 PM
I think the Glock will stay in the safe.

Thanks All

sideways
June 28, 2010, 03:56 PM
To many to purchase one of each
Not enough time to shoot them everyday
To accurate make my friends look silly shooting their Tupperware
Leave big holes in target
Make you feel like your a better shot than you really are

wojownik
June 28, 2010, 04:24 PM
Strahley sez:

1. Cost
2. Weight/magazine capacity ratio
3. JHP feeding issues
4. Unnecessary grip safety
5. Loose fitting "custom" parts


1. Cost - agreed, though Springfield, Remington and others have more affordable options.
2. Weight/magazine capacity ratio - not sure I agree. Especially if you're comparing a classic metal gun to polymer options.
3. JHP feeding issues - disagree, not in all 1911s. My Colt feeds JHPs flawlessly, as does my Springfield after a feed ramp polish.
4. Unnecessary grip safety - don't agree - I like the option of the grip safety, especially in a SA design like the 1911. It is a strong positive safety feature that is not at all intrusive.
5. Loose fitting "custom" parts - agreed. Some of the aftermarket stuff out there is ... "icky".

TexasPatriot.308
June 28, 2010, 04:51 PM
recently bought a used P89 from a friend of mine, I was with him when he bought it brand new about 6 years ago, he said he only shot less than a 20 round box thru it. I've only fired about 20 rounds thru it myself and couldnt hit anything at 20 yards. do they require a good break in say 100 or more rounds? do know they were discontinued in '07, dont know why. just wondering if I should keep it or sell it. thanks.:confused:

TexasPatriot.308
June 28, 2010, 05:12 PM
Sorry bout that, that was supposed to be a new topic, dont know how it got here.

Ratdog68
June 28, 2010, 05:55 PM
WHAT!!!!
You had your question backwards (hence the dislexia remark) :D ... anyone in their right mind would trade off other platforms to GET a 1911. So, no... you're well within sanity guidelines to trade off another platform to GET a 1911. :D

rd2007
June 28, 2010, 07:03 PM
Top five problems I've had with mine so far..

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

My only real gripe is it's a PITA to take apart.

Gik-tal
June 28, 2010, 07:08 PM
The bigest problem with 1911's is that they tend to be addictive, it's hard to stop with just one.

rd2007
June 28, 2010, 07:25 PM
I do not believe that is a problem exclusive to 1911s, though :D

I'm getting #10 tomorrow..

sohcgt2
June 28, 2010, 09:09 PM
The top 5 problems with 1911's are that 1911 owners tend to defend the top 5 problems with 1911's

Quote:
Strahley sez:

1. Cost
2. Weight/magazine capacity ratio
3. JHP feeding issues
4. Unnecessary grip safety
5. Loose fitting "custom" parts

1. Cost - agreed, though Springfield, Remington and others have more affordable options.
2. Weight/magazine capacity ratio - not sure I agree. Especially if you're comparing a classic metal gun to polymer options.
3. JHP feeding issues - disagree, not in all 1911s. My Colt feeds JHPs flawlessly, as does my Springfield after a feed ramp polish.
4. Unnecessary grip safety - don't agree - I like the option of the grip safety, especially in a SA design like the 1911. It is a strong positive safety feature that is not at all intrusive.
5. Loose fitting "custom" parts - agreed. Some of the aftermarket stuff out there is ... "icky".

Or

Top five problems I've had with mine so far..

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

My only real gripe is it's a PITA to take apart.

Hatterasguy
June 28, 2010, 09:13 PM
I only have 1.

I love my Springfield, its my bedside pistol.


Some people say they are heavy, and they are. But I don't carry mine, and I like the weight it helps keep the pistol on target.

Ky Larry
June 28, 2010, 09:34 PM
1. Idiots who don't know how to take care of 1911's.
2. Morons who have never shot one who claim they are inaccurate.
3. Gun rapists with Dremmel tools who think they can improve on the original design.
4. Bozos who make junk reloads who claim the design is unreliable.
5. Gun shop commandos who say the design is antiquated and out dated.


Sorry. This isn't very "High Road." Just wanted to get it off my chest. Admins, please feel free to delete if you wish.

Guns and more
June 28, 2010, 10:36 PM
Bad design of the take down pin. Can't replace it without scratching the frame. No, really.
I did it and there was no other way when it was new. Darn thing won't go back in.

mljdeckard
June 28, 2010, 10:46 PM
Yes, they are so troublesome that they won't catch on. Pretty soon here people will wake up and quit buying them. No legs in this idea. Who was the twit who designed them anyway?

TonyAngel
June 28, 2010, 10:51 PM
I don't know of any problems inherent in the design of a 1911. Assuming that you got a "good" one, you shouldn't have any problems, short of having to replace the recoil spring. If I had to gripe about something, it's the use of a ramped barrel in single stack models from some manufacturers. Why'd they do that?

John Wayne
June 28, 2010, 10:52 PM
1. Hard/slow to field strip

2. Internal ejector

3. Dropping the slide will ruin your trigger

4. Lack of firing pin block safety on some models

5. Slide release is hard to reach

6. Ramped barrel

7. Design is weaker/more complicated than the later Browning short recoil action

All of the above are assuming you can find one that actually works. I have seen 1911s that ran without problems, but an extremely disproportionate number of 1911s I've shot, seen at the range, and seen at competitive shooting events fail compared to Glocks, Sigs, XDs, CZs...and pretty much any other modern handgun made by a reputable manufacturer.

Most 1911 conversations I've heard usually involve something along the lines of "I bought the gun for $800, then had to spend $300 on modifications to get it to work, and another few hundred trying to find which mags would feed reliably." The design is 100 years old, and was great for its time, but even Browning realized that there was room for improvement. The salient features of the 1911 that everyone loves (single action, single stack .45) are not inherent to the design, and can be incorporated into simpler, more reliable firearms.

JellyJar
June 28, 2010, 11:11 PM
Here is what I know:

1. Old style front sight that is staked on and will loosen up and fly off sometimes.

2. Plunger tube that controls the slide stop and safety is also staked on and will come loose. That is why standard 1911 left side grip panels cover the plunger tube to prevent it from coming off.

3. Extractor is staked on and will sometimes come off.

4. If the magazine follower and slide stop stud that sticks inside the mag well don't match up properly then the follower will jump around the slide stop and the slide will not lock open after last round as it should. ( Often bad mag issue really )

5. Extractor needs to be beveled properly on the bottom and needs to be tensioned properly ( bent inward a little ) or it will not work properly.

6. If ejection port is not opened enough it may cause stove pipe jams.

7. Firing pin stop ( that piece on the end of the frame where the rear of the firing pin protrudes ) can be too loose and slide down causing the gun to malfunction.

8. If firing pin spring is too weak then a drop on the muzzle or rear can cause a discharge if a round is in the chamber. Unless you have one with a passive firing pin safety then that interferes with having a good trigger.

Just remember that the 1911 was designed over a century ago. It is a good design but does have its weaknesses. Main reason the design is still popular is ( IMHO ) because it is a single action pistol and most companies are reluctant to make single action pistols.

Also, it is a design that is heavily dependent on being assembled properly, unlike so many designs today that are virtually stamped out with little or no fitting needed. That is why top of the line 1911s cost so much. You pay as much if not more for the hand fitting as you do for the parts!

I currently own one. A Springfield EMP 40 that has the issues taken care of. Pricey though!

killchain
June 28, 2010, 11:25 PM
I will agree with you, if by "people" you are including all the employees at Kimber.
+1

1. The gun comes apart like a heart surgery. Complicated.
2. Lack of ammunition capacity. Most newer .45 handguns have double the capacity.
3. KIMBER. Those things, being "tight" require like a 350,000 round break in.
4. Most of them aren't made in the United States anymore. INCLUDING Springfield Armory.
5. Cost. $1500 for a handgun that holds half the ammunition as a $550 handgun and is just as reliable?

John Parker
June 28, 2010, 11:33 PM
Lieutenants.

jffielde
June 28, 2010, 11:57 PM
1. 1911-owners are fanatics, so they'll blame the disproportionate reliability issues on extractor tension, reloads, slide shorter than original length, cheap knock-offs, limp-wristing, Bubba's (there's a reason they're all trying to polish that feed ramp), and the illusive jam-fairy. Really, you can't get less reliability for the money.

2. Idiot marks. If 9 out of 10 people cannot take the gun apart as designed without marring the finish, then it's a non-optimal take-down design.

3. Can't get less capacity for the weight.

In response to the above, 1911s are the most beautiful handgun ever created and can be made accurate (and supremely reliable) for $1,500 - $2,500. For people with plenty of money, guns in that price range are generally flawless. Idiot marks are generally avoidable with practice and are merely cosmetic. Finally, 1911s are incredibly slim, especially for a .45 ACP. I find that I can conceal a full-size 1911 more easily than many subcompacts and small revolvers.

Clarence
June 29, 2010, 12:26 AM
There isn't anything wrong with my 1911's.

mljdeckard
June 29, 2010, 12:55 AM
Mine either. I paid $630 for it and it runs perfectly. For years and thousands of rounds.

Clifford
June 29, 2010, 01:36 AM
I'll have to agree, from experience.

#1-3 people messing with them.

#4 magazines

#5 ammo ( many new 1911's will feed just about anything nowadays but not all)

And as many have said, #6 they really like to reproduce. First it's one turn your back on them and next thing you know you've got a bakers dozen.

I'm talking about 1911's that follow Brownings original design. I think it's funny how people bitch about broken slide stops when the problem is some bubba long linked the barrel and now it's riding the link instead of the barrel feet (as originally designed). Also they complain about jams when the slide, frame and barrel bushing have been fitted so tightly the friggin slide takes a hammer to move after 30 rounds.

I think it's funny how people bitch about how hard it is to field strip. Really? If you can talk on your phone, sip your latte and blast down the freeway at 70MPH, stripping a 1911 down to all it's parts isn't hard. People are lazy, they don't have any interest in learning how to do anything that might cut into their TV time.

Let's be honest with ourselves. Yes it's a hundred year old design. Yes the staked plunger tube is not the smartest idea. Yes many handguns are just as good and better in manufacture and reliability. But if left as intended they are long lasting and reliable single action handguns.

sidheshooter
June 29, 2010, 01:59 AM
Frankly, if folks expected their Glocks and XDs to run with as wide a variety of ammo and as many totally varied designs of aftermarket magazines, we'd be hearing of all sorts of polymer problems. Get good mags. Get a round that feeds well in your gun. Shoot.

Rinse, lather and repeat...

JoeSlomo
June 29, 2010, 02:24 AM
Shooter induced problems common to new 1911 owners / those unfamiliar with the platform:

1. Failure to grip the gun properly resulting in a failure to fire due to failing to properly engage the grip safety.

2. Failure to fire caused by shooter failing to release the thumb safety.

3. Failure to fire due to poor grip resulting in the shooter engaging the thumb safety during recoil.

4. Stoppages resulting from a failure to properly lubricate the firearm.

Potential gun problems:

1. Stoppages resulting from a poorly tuned extractor coughKIMBERcough...cough.

2. Stoppages resulting from poorly designed / manufactured magazines.

3. Stoppages resulting from poorly shaped hollow point rounds that get hung up on the feed ramp.

I own 5 1911's and have only had problems with ONE coughKIMBERcough...cough.

jonboynumba1
June 29, 2010, 09:20 AM
I've got a 21SF in my holster right now....I love 1911's...the only real answer is that if you are asking that question you must need BOTH! but yeah....keep the 21 SF damn fine gun! reliable accurate and enough rounds to invade a small country for about the same weight and a little extra width! Mine is loaded with doubletap 185gr Noslers at 1200+ FPS with 600+ pounds of energy...i've ALWAYS been a 230gr guy in .45...but this is an exceptional load in this gun and with 14 rounds on board a bit lighter. Like a .40 on CRACK and STEROIDS!! ;)

OregonJohnny
June 29, 2010, 02:08 PM
I have only owned 1 1911 - a standard full-size S&W 1911 stainless in .45ACP. It has a couple thousand rounds through it with no major problems. The only problem at all was in the first 200 rounds, the slide would occasionally not stay back on the last round. I switched out the S&W mags for Wilson mags and have never had the problem since. So I guess, "magazines" could be a potential problem. If you're talking about problems with the design itself, I have a few issues, but they are of course based on my personal preferences:

1. Take-down is not as easy and fast as other handguns like a Beretta 92, or a Glock, XD, etc., and requires a special tool.

2. Edges of the trigger are a little sharp and can cause a blister on the trigger finger during extended range sessions.

3. Superb thin design limits capacity to 7+1, or 8+1 with modern magazines.

4. With the hammer down, racking the slide takes A LOT of muscle, when compared to other semi-auto handgun designs. Some people with small or weak hands may not be able to reliably chamber the first round or clear a malfunction.

5. Take-down can cause "idiot marks" very easily, and can quickly turn a brand-new beautiful 1911 into a permanently scarred one.

jpatterson
June 29, 2010, 02:42 PM
Based purely on my experiences with mine:

1. Magazines - Over a thousand rounds through my Kimber Custom II, only time it ever hiccuped was with the standard magazines it came with. 12 FTF/FTE out of over 1000 rounds with the base Kimber model, I can't bash Kimber in any regard. Grabbed a few Wilson Combat magazines, haven't had a single problem since the first few rounds I put down the pipe. :neener: Kimber Bashers! :neener:

2. Take down/reassembly - The first few times I broke it down to fully clean and lube it, it took me a bit to get used to the system of reassembly. I'm the kind of guy that does things like that when I'm bored, and now I can completely field strip and reassemble my 1911 in less than a minute. Just takes some getting used to.

3. Capacity - Really not that big of a deal to me, I feel that I am combat-efficient with my 1911. 8 rounds should be more than enough for any situation I'd ever be in.

I don't mean to sound like a 1911 culter, but I really don't have anything else. I like mine.

sohcgt2
June 30, 2010, 09:53 PM
1. Magazines need to be discarded earlier in their life than some other platforms.

2. Reassembly damage can be eliminated by using a razorblade to hold the spring back while installing the slide stop.

3. Ammo is ammo, if your gun won't cycle it send it back to the factory. Shoot again and repeat.

4&5. The people who own them sometimes gloss over the problems inherent in the design, most likely because they epitomise what a handgun should look like.

230therapy
June 30, 2010, 10:24 PM
Bad shooters
Jamming
Busted parts
Worn parts
Bad gunsmithing

Just like many other guns out there :)

yeti
June 30, 2010, 11:03 PM
2. Reassembly damage can be eliminated by using a razorblade to hold the spring back while installing the slide stop.


Or just putting it back together correctly; just the way it comes out is the way it goes back in, no razor blades required.

XxWINxX94
July 1, 2010, 12:47 AM
1. Where they are made

FTSESQ
July 1, 2010, 12:59 AM
#'s 1-3: People messing with them

#4: Magazines

#5: Ammunition


+1 to that!

makarovnik
July 1, 2010, 03:23 AM
King of feedway stoppages.

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