by design? G17 load and chamber


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Acal
June 28, 2010, 11:22 AM
i noticed something interesting at the range saturday.... if i "hard load" the mag into the g17 while the slide is locked back, i can make it chamber a round. is it supposed to be like that? it doesnt require a lot of force either, i can do it with my hand by hitting the bottom of the magazine with my palm. pretty neat... lol

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JoeMal
June 28, 2010, 11:27 AM
So you hit the bottom of the mag while the slide is back, and it releases the slide and chambers a round?

Or you slamming the mag into the gun while the slide is back causes it to slide shut?

I just did both on my Gen3 G17 and it did NOT slide shut. I would say this is a defect and should be investigated, but I'm no expert

legion3
June 28, 2010, 01:51 PM
All Glocks can do that, it was not specifically designed to do so but it is not a defect either. At a certain angle the mag will trigger the slide stop, as will a certain pressure.

We talked about this at the Glock armorer's course in May and it is no big deal nor a defect.

JoeMal
June 28, 2010, 02:03 PM
it was not specifically designed to do so but it is not a defect either.If it was not designed to perform this way, how would it not be a defect?

Honestly it doesn't sound very safe to me

Maybe some guns have less of a notch (or the notch has been worn down) were it is more easily released? And the mere force of sliding in a mag is enough to release it?

tehweej
June 28, 2010, 02:03 PM
The 92FS I shoot does that too. If you run the mag in hard enough, the slide will close. Sometimes it misses the first round, but it can be handy for speed reloads in competition.

From my limited knowledge of physics, in theory, hitting the gun from the bottom and at an angle slightly forward (such as the angle the magazine goes in) would cause the frame to move forward, lowering the tension on the slide stop, and the upward motion might help the slide stop return to the disengaged position. Just a guess tho. I have no idea if any of this makes sense to anyone else. That is why I love the land of theory, tis a wonderful place, everything works :)

greyling22
June 28, 2010, 03:56 PM
mine does it occasionally with a non-drop-free mag. kinda scares me when it does. It is not supposed to do it. I'm thinking of pulling the release out and bending the spring to provide more tension. but that might not work at all.

FLAvalanche
June 28, 2010, 04:03 PM
Like Microsoft says...It's a feature!

Strahley
June 28, 2010, 04:51 PM
I've never had that happen to me with ANY gun. You don't have to Falcon Punch the magazine into the mag well for it to go in correctly

NG VI
June 28, 2010, 05:13 PM
If it was not designed to perform this way, how would it not be a defect?

Honestly it doesn't sound very safe to me


It's not a defect because it isn't a problem. Loading assistance. Definitely isn't unsafe.

It is not supposed to do it. I'm thinking of pulling the release out and bending the spring to provide more tension. but that might not work at all.

Not supposed to not do it either. I wouldn't pull anything out of it and bend it, everything is where it should be.


You don't have to Falcon Punch the magazine into the mag well for it to go in correctly


This. My USP would do it, but I never really noticed until I took a friend to the range and he said there was a problem, then I see him pounding the magazine in and realized it only did it for him because he was handling my pistol like a drunken ape. So then we had a chat about the amount of force needed to make things happen, and the differences between hollywood gunplay and private property on a range, and also the differences between the way you handle government arms (give 'er the grease!) and personally owned ones.

m136
June 29, 2010, 07:36 PM
I don't know if I would call what JoeMal said is a design flaw in the pistol. In the training I have received and practice I do, this happens more often in my two Glocks G19 & G23 and also in a Berretta M9 when I rapidly insert a magazine. A dynamic situation needs a fast action.

When at a range I see it as a good thing, I only place a mag in when I will be firing. It can only be as dangerous as the person operating it.

I recommend less experienced people seek training to build confidence in their skill in handling their fire arms. This is not a put down, just my opinion.

:)

Edit for correct name.

Steve C
June 29, 2010, 07:57 PM
This happens when the slide stop isn't fully engaged, usually when the mag spring is beginning to get a bit weak and/or the follower is worn and not pushing it up fully into the notch on the slide.

Just for a test try engage the slide stop manually making sure its fully into its notch and see if you can get the slide to drop when inserting a mag without touching the slide stop.

After a while the slide will stop locking open after the last round reliably. The fix is to replace your mag springs and update your followers if they are worn.

msiley
June 29, 2010, 08:04 PM
This happens with my CZ 75. If you slam in a mag hard enough the slide will go forward.
I think this has only happened from going to slide lock after the last shot.
I don't think it's a big deal. I am putting in a mag so my next step would be to release the slide.

piece of meat
June 29, 2010, 10:55 PM
happens with my cz-75 as well. pretty convenient/cool actually, i just slam the next full mag in and it chambers the first round automatically. doesnt happen everytime tho, still havent figured out what exactly causes it.

VA27
June 29, 2010, 11:43 PM
I have an early G17 (1989) that will do it regularly. I was told at my first armorer school (1990) that it was designed to do that. My G22 will do it if the angles are just right, but the G17 does it easily. Not a problem to me.

On the other hand, My P7 will drop the slide when I squeeze the grip!:eek::D:neener:

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