Value for my rifles and shotgun?


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AXPTunes
July 1, 2010, 11:59 PM
I have to sell my Father's and Grandfather's hunting rifles/shotgun and would like to know about what they are worth and if anyone knows anything about the year they were made

Winchester MODEL 1912 nickel steel 16GA pump #1896XX
Winchester MODEL 94 .32 WS #11012XX
Winchester MODEL 70 .270 WCF #1264XX

All have been cared for and in very good condition.


If anyone can help.......please let me know?

thx

AXPTunes

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rm23
July 2, 2010, 01:32 AM
gunbroker.com

Chicken-Farmer
July 2, 2010, 01:48 AM
MODEL 12 SLIDE ACTION Add to Collection
- 12 (introduced 1914), 16 (introduced 1914), 20 (initial ga., mfg. 1912, 2 1/2 in. chamber mfg. until 1927), or 28 (introduced 1937) ga., 25 (20 ga. only, mfg. 1912-14), 26, 28, 30, or 32 in. standard, nickel, or stainless steel (scarce) barrel with or without rib (matted, solid, or VR), 2 9/16 (early 16 or 20 ga., until 1927, at ser. no. 464,565), 2 3/4 (became standard 1927) or 3 in. chamber, 6 shot, blue metal, various chokes, hammerless, plain pistol grip or straight walnut stock and forearm, marked Model 1912 from 1912-1919, approx. ser. no. 172,000. 14 in. LOP was original standard, then changed to 14 1/2 in. circa 1930. Mfg. 1912-1976.
Grading 100% 98% 95% 90% 80% 70% 60%
12 ga. $700 $550 $450 $375 $325 $275 $225
16 ga. $800 $625 $495 $425 $350 $300 $275
20 ga. $1,100 $900 $725 $650 $575 $500 $450
28 ga. $5,500 $4,750 $4,250 $3,850 $3,400 $2,850 $2,500
Subtract 50% if with non-factory Cutts compensator (has choke marked on barrel).
Add 25% for factory installed Cutts compensator (no choke marking on barrel).
Add 20% for 32 in. barrel.
Add 40% for original box with papers.
The following add-ons DO NOT apply to 28 ga. values.
Add 40%-50% for Win. solid rib.
Add 50%-60% for Win. milled VR.
Add 25%-50% for "Deluxe Field Grade" with fancy checkered wood, depending on condition.
Add 10% for pre-WWII mfg.
Add 60% for each extra barrel(s).
Add 40%-50% for Win. special VR (offset barrel proofmark).
"Y" prefix appears on Model 12s built 1964-1980 - see listing under Post-64 Models.
Nickel steel barrel Model 12s (mfg. 1912-1931) have become very popular in recent years, and some collectors are actually specializing on nickel steel Model 12s only. Winchester proofed steel barrels were introduced in 1931.
Stainless steel barrel Model 12s were introduced during 1926 as a special order only, and discontinued in 1931 (65X,XXX serial range). Values typically range between $1,450 - $3,500, and are very rare in over 95% original condition, as the bluing easily wore off the stainless steel barrel since it was a "Japaned" finish, not regular bluing.
Original gauge can be determined by removing the buttstock and observing the gauge marking on the stock screw boss.
"Donut" post Winchester VRs are more desirable than the rectangular post.
13-15 in. LOPs could be special ordered on Model 12s until 1964.
Special order features on field guns have captured much collector interest in recent years. Combinations of these features can add a considerable percentage to the base values listed. Rare special orders on rare variations are very desirable and prices can double and more if the combination is right. As is the case with most other collectible shotguns at this time, Model 12s with open choked barrels in shorter lengths are A LOT more desirable (and expensive) than a specimen with a 30 in. full choke barrel (most common). Values listed are for standard configuration (28 or 30 in. full choke barrel with no rib). For most Model 12s, values for condition factors less than 60% will approximate the 60% price, because of shooter demand. Premiums must be added for the rarer open choked barrels in shorter length on all gauges.
Recently, some non-original, re-stamped 28 ga. barrels have been added to 16 or 20 ga. frames "creating" a more desirable (and expensive) gun to unsuspecting buyers. Roll die markings are getting better and better so be very cautious when considering a non-Cutts 28 ga. (as in get a receipt specifying originality). 28 ga. ser. no. range is approx. 720,138 to 1,857,XXX. 28 ga. Model 12s were available with both 2 3/4 (common) or 2 7/8 (infrequent) in. chamber. The 28 ga. has a magazine tube which is crimped, swaged, and necked at the rear and is visible with barrel assembly off and slide pulled back, enabling mag tube to protrude slightly at the rear of receiver extension. Believe it or not, there are getting to be a lot of fake Model 12 boxes that have been intentionally aged. Carefully screen NIB (watch the hanging tag also) specimens in this model.
Editor's Note: The Model 12 Winchester was produced continuously from 1912-1980. Over 2,027,500 were produced both in standard and deluxe (Pigeon) grades. Pigeon grades were first listed in 1914 and disc. during the war (1941). Reintroduced in 1948, they were disc. permanently in 1964, after which the Super Pigeon Grade became available only on a custom-order basis from Winchester's Custom Gun Shop. These guns are worth 50-300% premiums depending on gauge, barrel lengths, stock options, engraving patterns, etc.
With an attrition rate of 33%, Model 12s with rare features produced 50 years ago will only be much rarer today (and expensive). 28 ga. guns were built between 1934 and 1960. Gauge rarity in increasing order is 12 ga., 16 ga., 20 ga., .410 bore (Model 42), and 28 ga. Serialization breakdown by year of manufacture is provided under the "Model Serialization" section of this book. When collecting Model 12s, ser. nos. on the underside of receiver (forward end), should match ser. no. on bottom rear of Mag. tube.

Chicken-Farmer
July 2, 2010, 01:51 AM
WINCHESTER : RIFLES: MODEL 94 LEVER ACTION, 1964-2006 MFG.
Due to engineering changes in 1992, all Model 94s and variations (not including the 9422 models) had a crossbolt safety in the upper rear of the receiver which prevents the hammer from contacting the firing pin.
100th Anniversary Model 1894s (mfg. 1994) are marked "1894-1994" on the receiver. During 2003, Winchester discontinued the crossbolt receiver safety, and introduced the new top tang safety.
U.S. Repeating Arms closed its New Haven, CT manufacturing facility on March 31, 2006, and an auction was held on Sept. 27-28, 2006, selling the production equipment and related assets.
The Model 94s listed below w/crossbolt safety (1992-2006 mfg.) are not as desirable as those models w/o the crossbolt safety manufactured pre-1992, unless a rare variation, configuration and/or caliber is involved.
AE suffix on the following models indicates angle eject.
MODEL 94 STANDARD MODEL Add to Collection
- .30-30 Win., .32 Win. Spl. (disc. 1973, reintroduced 1992), 7-30 Waters (new 1989), .44 Mag. (mfg. circa late 1960s-1970s), .44 Spl. (mfg. 1984), .444 Marlin (mfg. 1984), or .45 LC (mfg. 1984) cal., lever action, 6 or 7 (24 in. barrel only) shot tube mag., 20 or 24 (mfg. 1987-88 only) in. round barrel, open sights, straight walnut stock, two barrel bands on forearm, Angle Eject became standard 1984, 6 1/2 lbs. Mfg. 1964-1997.
Grading 100% 98% 95% 90% 80% 70% 60%
$425 $350 $295 $250 $200 $175 $150
Last MSR was $363.
Add 25% for 7-30 Waters cal.

Chicken-Farmer
July 2, 2010, 01:54 AM
MODEL 70 STANDARD GRADE (1946-1963 PRODUCTION) Add to Collection
- 18 standard cals. including .22 Hornet, .220 Swift, .243 Win., .250 Savage (.250-3000), .257 Roberts, .264 Win. Mag., .270 Win., 7x57mm Mauser, .300 Savage, .300 H&H, .300 Win. Mag., .30-06, .308 Win., .338 Win. Mag., .35 Rem., .358 Win., and .375 H&H, 5 shot mag., 4 shot mag. on Magnums, 24, 25, or 26 in. barrel, open sights, checkered walnut pistol grip stock, ser. range is 52,549-581,471. Mfg. 1946-1963.
Grading 100% 98% 95% 90% 80% 70% 60%
Standard cals. $1,450 $1,200 $1,100 $900 $650 $550 $500
.22 Hornet $2,650 $2,575 $2,050 $1,850 $1,375 $1,050 $950
.220 Swift $2,300 $1,900 $1,750 $1,125 $825 $625 $550
.243 Win. $1,650 $1,425 $1,275 $900 $775 $650 $575
.257 Roberts $3,000 $2,350 $2,075 $1,650 $1,150 $800 $625
.264 Mag. (Westerner) $2,000 $1,775 $1,650 $1,050 $825 $625 $550
.270 Win. $1,600 $1,325 $1,100 $750 $625 $575 $550
.300 H&H $2,400 $2,100 $1,650 $1,100 $925 $700 $600
.300 Win. Mag. $3,150 $2,850 $2,500 $1,800 $1,450 $1,100 $925
.338 Win. Mag. $2,800 $2,375 $2,100 $1,550 $1,150 $950 $800
.375 H&H $3,300 $2,975 $2,750 $2,075 $1,850 $1,650 $1,325
Add 10% for .300 H&H or .375 H&H if rear receiver is not drilled and tapped.
Add 30% for stainless steel barrel in .300 H&H or .270 Win. cal.
Values listed assume original, unaltered specimens - modifications/alterations to either the metal or wood surfaces can reduce prices by large amounts. Most post-war Model 70s are drilled on top of the receiver (2 holes in front and 2 holes in back) to accept scope mounts (except early .300 and .375 H&H cals.). Pre-1962 mfg. Model 70s are desirable since Winchester implemented manufacturing techniques that lowered the quality beginning in 1964.
Rare cals. such as the .250-3000, .300 Savage, .308 Win. (extremely rare, so watch for fakes), .35 Rem., and 7x57mm Mauser are seldomly seen or sold. Premiums depend on the rarity of the caliber and original condition.
Believe it or not, there are getting to be a lot of fake Model 70 boxes that have been intentionally aged. Carefully screen NIB (watch the hanging tag also) specimens in this model.

Chicken-Farmer
July 2, 2010, 01:57 AM
AXPTunes,
Why the rush to sell your family heirlooms? I am honored to own firearms that my Grandfathers and father used to hunt with when they were my age. All three of the firearms that you listed are extremely well made, and will certainly last for generations to come. I always hate to see people selling off items that were passed onto them by loved ones.

Chicken-Farmer

AXPTunes
July 2, 2010, 05:00 PM
Hi

Thanks for the thought, but I an going through a divorce and need the money. Never wanted to do this and never thought I would. Life takes strange turns.

AXPTunes

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