Threshhold for hearing protection


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ArtP
July 4, 2010, 09:08 PM
I've been toying with the idea of buying a 22 hornet rifle for plinking. The appeal is it's ballistically superior to a 22LR (by a pretty wide margin), cheap to reload for and the barrel should last forever. But the biggest appeal is having something I can shoot without heaing protection and the recoil light enough for me to witness bullet impact through the scope. I'm asking for a 22LR but with better ballistics, better than a 22 mag too. I'd also like to be able to reload for it, which means the 17 HMR is out.

I usually shoot my 22LR stuff without hearing protection. I am wondering what your threshhold for hearing protection is. As well, what is your shreshhold for being able to see bullet impact through your scope without recoil causing you to miss the view? I use muffs or plugs for everything but 22LR, and at times I'll put it on for that, too. For instance if I'm shooting in a covered area where the sound is amplified. For scoped rifles I go from 22LR then jump to .243 (no 22 centerfire rifles). With the .243, try as I might, I can't see impact.

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General Geoff
July 4, 2010, 09:38 PM
I usually shoot my 22LR stuff without hearing protection.

Have fun with tinnitus in your later years.

If you want to shoot without hearing protection, invest in a silencer.

Millwright
July 4, 2010, 10:13 PM
Anything above a whisper son ! BTDTGTTS !! Eh !? Wha !!! ? Whadda y'uh mean its too loud ?

Seriously, hearing loss is progressive and insideous. You don't notice it because, in most instances, you can "adjust" the source to your comfort level, or.....after a brief time the "noise isn't that bad"......Which a sure sign you're making a serious sacrifice.....>MW

ArtP
July 4, 2010, 10:17 PM
Shall I just "off" the question now?

Smart ellec remark - shall I put on the hearing protection when bikers pass with their obnoxious un-baffled pipes? How about when I'm getting nagged? How about when i pass a construction zone? I'll keep the muffs ready at all times.

jcwit
July 4, 2010, 10:18 PM
Yup, I think if I knew then what I know now I'd wear hearing protectors. Now I wear Hearing Aids, $3,000 per ear!

C96
July 4, 2010, 10:18 PM
The 22 Hornet is a neat little round BUT it can be a challenge to reload. You should stick to one brand of brass, the powder capacity can very by a grain or more between brands, the brass is a bit delicate, easy to crush the brass if not careful. It is a neat round to shoot although I did mine with a TC Contender and a 14 inch barrel.

If I recall correctly there have been some on this forum with difficulties with this round but other than being a bit careful when sizing and seating I liked it.

I sold my Contender to feed other projects so I haven't done Hornets in some time, but I liked the round.

allan

JellyJar
July 4, 2010, 10:21 PM
Take a look at this site....

http://www.nwhealth.edu/healthyU/stayHealthy/ear3.html


How Much is Too Much?*
NIOSH states that the maximum amount of time a person can be exposed to 85 dBA without experiencing hearing damage is 8 hours; this is the average level of noise a person hears every day. However, continuous exposure to 85 dBA beyond the 8-hour limit will cause hearing loss. If a person is exposed to level above 85 dBA, the risk of hearing loss increases in a shorter amount of time. The maximum time allowed for 110 dBA (e.g. a crying baby) is 1 minute 29 seconds. If a person is exposed to a noise that has a measurement of 140 dBA (e.g. airplane departure), immediate inner ear damage would result.


Also, please note that the frequency of the noise is also very important to keep in mind. The parts of our inner ears that respond to high frequency are more easily damaged than the parts that respond to low frequency.

Given that the 22 hornet is a small caliber high velocity round I would expect that the noise it generates would be a high frequency blast.

Keep those earplugs/muffs handy!

ArtP
July 4, 2010, 10:41 PM
Okay. You guy are just making a point and looking out for my hearing. I appreciate your care and concern. I will heed the warning.

Funny story. I took my long-time girlfriend's son shooting with me. He's the quiet type and doesn't talk a whole lot. He asked me on the way home if he could keep the ear plugs for when his sister talks (it was a totally honest and innocent question). I got a huge kick out of that, I responded with "you keep 'em handy - just in case"!

Another funny story. I have a friend I took shooting and he refused to wear the hearing protection I took along for him. We were shooting a 9mm and a 270 WSM. The 270 WSM is no slouch on the noise meter. On the way home he kept saying, "huh". I just shook my head and frowned.

Onward Allusion
July 4, 2010, 11:16 PM
I personally would not shoot 22LR (standard or high velocity) without hearing protection. I once shot a 22LR round indoors in a hallway and my ears were ringing for over a hour. A 22LR rifle outdoors would be less harsh but hearing damage does accumulate.

ArtP (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=122380)
Threshhold for hearing protection

Ky Larry
July 4, 2010, 11:31 PM
Hearing loss is cumulative. It can happen slowly over time and not be very noticeable. Once it's gone, it's gone. Expanding foam ear plugs are cheap, effective, and disposable. They don't get in the way. I use ear muffs any time I shoot anything louder than an air gun. Also, a good rule of thumb for any noisy situation is: If you have to raise your voice above normal conversation level to be understood, you need hearing protection.

OkieOFT
July 4, 2010, 11:41 PM
Wow - You guys would die if you knew the things I do. I shoot .22LR (and in most cases, much larger rounds) without hearing protection, turn the radio up to 100 anytime i'm in the car and whenever I go to a concert I stand right in front of the speaker stack for the best sound. I'll be deaf by the time i'm 30!

hso
July 4, 2010, 11:57 PM
I am wondering what your threshhold for hearing protection is.

When shooting any firearm or in the presence of any firearm being shot. Exceptions to the rule would be any subsonic suppressed firearm with a dB level below 100.

jcwit
July 5, 2010, 12:30 AM
Wow - You guys would die if you knew the things I do. I shoot .22LR (and in most cases, much larger rounds) without hearing protection, turn the radio up to 100 anytime i'm in the car and whenever I go to a concert I stand right in front of the speaker stack for the best sound. I'll be deaf by the time i'm 30!

Well thats something to really be proud of, yes sir.

Hope you're good at reading lips!

benEzra
July 5, 2010, 01:05 AM
I usually shoot my 22LR stuff without hearing protection. I am wondering what your threshhold for hearing protection is.
I use hearing protection for anything .22LR and up. I don't use hearing protection when shooting bows, BB guns, and .22 CB's.

A .22LR is loud enough to cause stark and immediate threshold shift, and anything loud enough to cause threshold shift is loud enough to damage your hearing.

Smart ellec remark - shall I put on the hearing protection when bikers pass with their obnoxious un-baffled pipes? How about when I'm getting nagged? How about when i pass a construction zone? I'll keep the muffs ready at all times.
Depending on barrel length, a .22LR shooting ordinary ammunition peaks somewhere between 145 and 155 decibels (low end is rifle, high end is pistol). A loud motorcycle will be around 110 dB, and I doubt it would be over 125dB even running without mufflers. A jackhammer is probably around 125-130 dB at the user's ears, so if you're driving by, it will be far lower. There is simply no comparison; guns, even .22's, are vastly louder than almost anything else in our everyday experience, unless you work on an aircraft carrier deck.

MinnMooney
July 5, 2010, 01:06 AM
Hear loss is built upon a few extremely load blasts OR thousands of lesser noises over many years time. If you plan on shooting anything that is supersonic, i.e., faster than 1100fps (+/-), you should wear protection. The younger you are, the more important it is.

CraigC
July 5, 2010, 01:08 AM
Wear hearing protection for everything! Even .22LR rifles. I'm only 35yrs old and have 'usually' been pretty good about hearing protection but did a lot of rimfire and shotgun shooting in my younger days without hearing protection and I'm paying for it now. Need a little ambient noise so I can sleep through the tinnitus. Keep what you have, put some ear muffs on. The only thing I will shoot without hearing protection (besides while hunting obviously) are .22 CB's.

MinnMooney
July 5, 2010, 01:11 AM
from OkieOFT (post #11) : Wow - You guys would die if you knew the things I do. I shoot .22LR (and in most cases, much larger rounds) without hearing protection, turn the radio up to 100 anytime i'm in the car and whenever I go to a concert I stand right in front of the speaker stack for the best sound. I'll be deaf by the time i'm 30!

I believe you are correct in thinking that you'll be deaf by...........

I said, "I believe you are correct in thinking that you'll be deaf by the time you're 30! "

RhinoDefense
July 5, 2010, 01:21 AM
Impulse is 140dB and continuous is 85dB.

Note that sound pressure (dB measurement) is NOT LINEAR, but exponential meaning the difference between 100dB and 101dB is much, much greater than the difference between 99dB and 100dB.

I use a suppressor on every firearm I own.

ArtP
July 5, 2010, 02:27 AM
The only thing I will shoot without hearing protection (besides while hunting obviously) are .22 CB's.

You bring a good point. Why don't people wear protection while hunting?

A few rounds of 338 mag with a muzzle brake while hunting are okay, but more rounds of 22LR are not while plinking?

JohnKSa
July 5, 2010, 02:41 AM
A few rounds of 338 mag with a muzzle brake while hunting are okay...It's absolutely not ok, but lots of people do inadvisable things every day.

From what I can determine people don't wear hearing protection while hunting for one or more of the following reasons.

1. They don't have good electronic hearing protection and they don't want to block out noises that might alert them to the presence of game.

2. They think it's too much of a hassle.

3. They are not aware that even exposure to one or two shots from a firearm without hearing protection can cause permanent hearing damage.

I have a good set of electronic muffs and I wouldn't hunt without them. They provide binaural capability so I can still locate sounds like I would without hearing protection installed and they can be turned up to allow me to hear better than I would be able to without them.

natman
July 5, 2010, 04:18 AM
You bring a good point. Why don't people wear protection while hunting?

A few rounds of 338 mag with a muzzle brake while hunting are okay, but more rounds of 22LR are not while plinking?

I do wear protection while hunting. I have hunted for years with a set of Peltor 6s and have hundreds of hours with them. If you set the volume at normal levels you can locate sounds and after a while you forget you have them on. It is great when they turn a shotguns BOOM into a faraway boom.

http://www.amazon.com/Peltor-97044-Tactical-Hearing-Protector/dp/B00009363P

Trust me on this - once you get tinnitus you will beg for the chance to go back and wear hearing protection every chance you get.

And no, a few rounds with anything with a muzzle brake without protection are NOT OK.

bigfatdave
July 5, 2010, 06:49 AM
I do industrial work, hearing protection is an everyday thing, and hearing tests have been roughly every 2 years since I was 17.
I can show you charts from me (I always use hearing protection) and you'd see a slow minor loss from aging and exposure.
Compare them to the charts of someone who skips plugs "once in a while" (more decline, loss of high-frequency sensitivity) or someone who has been going without or using cotton balls (much larger decline, large loss across all frequencies) and the difference is obvious. I notice equipment failure sounds well before my peers who skip hearing protection, I can hear frequencies most people my age can't, and I still know I've lost some sensitivity from some dumb choices and some unintended exposures, I'm not about to cause more damage on purpose, and I think anyone who does is a fool.

The sharp concussion from a firearm is even more damaging than the drone of a ship's engineroom or the scream of a commercial power plant. If you feel your ears ringing you've already done damage, if you feel pain you've probably moved into permanent damage territory. To compare to a loud motorcycle ignores the difference between concussion and a steady noise level, it also ignores the fact that you can't control motorcycles and you can control your gear while shooting.

Personally, I've experimented with plugs out shooting low-velocity .22shorts out of a rifle and revolver. I won't be repeating the experiment with the revolver or any handgun, a lever/bolt/single-shot rifle isn't too bad, but the plugs are on anyway because I rarely just shoot .22CB shorts.

There's nothing macho about letting your hearing be damaged.
... I said "there's nothing macho about letting your hearing get damaged"

Heading out to take 1-3 shots hunting outdoors without hearing protection is a choice some people make, and I can see the logic to a degree. But generally I run hundreds of rounds at a range session, often whoever I'm shooting with will help me deplete a 550-round box of cheap .22lr, plus centerfire pistol, maybe plus some rifle rounds.
And who knows who else will be at the club's range, there might be some jerk testing out his handloads in a magnum revolver or someone who shows up, shoots a nice quiet .22 bolt gun for a half hour and pulls out a .900loudenboomer rifle after a cold range for target changing ... SURPRISE!

Just get the big package of plugs (you can get a jar of 200 for a few bucks) and toss it in your range stuff, it isn't that hard, it isn't that expensive, and it might help dispel the stereotype of dumb deaf redneck shooters.
I like the silicone flanged plugs, myself ... they're re-usable, washable, and have a string to keep me from losing one. I have muffs also, just for when I have to share the range or I shoot indoors on a small rental range.

hso
July 5, 2010, 09:51 AM
People don't use hearing protection for one of two reasons, either ignorance or stupidity.

Ignorance of the cumulative damage that repeated exposure will produce. Ignorance of the truly negative impact on the quality of life hearing loss and tinnitus will produce. Ignorance of the ease in which hearing can be protected with just a little effort.

An analogy may help, everyone's heard stories about shooting a tree down. Each bullet hitting the tree does little damage, but over time it adds up. Put a lot of rounds on target in a short period of time and the tree comes down quickly, but the tree is damaged regardless of how fast you shoot at it and given enough shots even over a few years the damage can simply kill the tree.

We have had one of these types of threads every few months at THR. The professional advice is to protect your hearing. The advice from experienced shooters is to protect your hearing. We'll keep having them in spite of the fact the advice never changes because some people don't like the answer and wish it weren't true.

Vonderek
July 5, 2010, 10:03 AM
whenever I go to a concert I stand right in front of the speaker stack for the best sound. I'll be deaf by the time i'm 30!
You're wrong on both counts. The best sound is not in front of the speaker stack and you are probably already partially deaf before age 30. The best sound is where the engineer and mix board are which is usually in the middle of the venue. I played in rock bands from my late teens to early thirties. However, it was as a concertgoer at a Sammy Hagar concert when I was 21 that permanently blew out my left ear. Stupidly, I never wore any ear protection after and now my hearing is bad and I have a constant hissing in my left ear.

Any loud abrupt noise is painful to me now. I have to wear plugs and muffs when I shoot and even then it can be painful depending on who's shooting what next to me. I keep baggies with earplugs in my range bag, in my car, and with my work gear. If I ever have to work in a club or near a construction site I use the plugs.

Once your ears go bad they will never heal.

jcwit
July 5, 2010, 10:13 AM
One other thing alot of folks do not realize that you loose is the ability to know where noise comes from. I have one of the best sets of aids that Micro-Tech make, but when the phone rings I have no idea where the ringing is coming from.

My damage is now done, no turning back, but you younger people have a chance to avoid this.

Another thought thats off topic some but in the same line of thought. I smoked for years, I quit 10 years ago, and have thought everything was fine. Well its not, have just found out I'm in the beginning stages of COPD, AKA emphysema, not a fun thing at all. Walking down to the 50 or 100 yd. line to post a target required a 5 to 10 minute rest rto quit gasping for air. Think about that youngsters, only walking,not running, walking, having to rest for 5 minutes, and I'm a lucky one with no spots on my lungs. Consider your future!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

oldbear
July 5, 2010, 10:31 AM
Wow - You guys would die if you knew the things I do. I shoot .22LR (and in most cases, much larger rounds) without hearing protection, turn the radio up to 100 anytime i'm in the car and whenever I go to a concert I stand right in front of the speaker stack for the best sound. I'll be deaf by the time i'm 30!

Add to your list ridding off road motorcycles, playing with race cars, driving at highway speeds with windows down, and shooting big bore handguns, all without hearing protection and that was me until I was 40 years old. At 61 I now have some serious hearing loss and believe me IT IS NOT FUN to miss much of what is being said. My family and friends are very understand of this, but at times I know they get tired of having to repeat themselves.:(

bigfatdave
July 7, 2010, 02:08 PM
I had another thought on this subject while I was shoving plugs in my head at work.

The human ear evolved to last maybe 50 years in a much quieter environment. Your ears aren't built ("designed" if you like) to handle; motorcycles, gunfire, loud machinery, jet engines, etc etc. They are set up to be good hunter/gatherer ears until you die of old age around 50, or at least until you've spawned as many offspring as possible.
So, much like women have to be concerned about bone loss as they age past evolution's threshold (after the age we pass on genes, results are not improved over time because there is little mechanism for passing along traits after the reproductive period in our lifespan) we should all consider that we're planning on taking our ears well past their warranty period and treat them like the precious resource they are.

coloradokevin
July 7, 2010, 03:16 PM
Honestly, I'm a strong proponent of hearing protection, and I'm one of the few people I know who will also wear hearing protection when hunting. But, I usually don't sweat the hearing protection too much with the .22lr in RIFLES (.22lr pistols are loud).

Don't get me wrong, I usually throw the ear plugs in while plinking, even with the .22's, but I have to admit that I've heard my share of these rifles without hearing protection in the past. Simply put, I don't believe the .22 rifles are all that loud when compared to other things we hear in our lives (fireworks displays? Road noise? Sirens on emergency vechicles? power tools?). We'd probably be well served to wear hearing protection for a lot of our activities in life, if the preservation of hearing is desired.

RhinoDefense
July 7, 2010, 04:18 PM
.22 rimfire rifles have a sound signature of 130-140dB depending on environmentals, ammunition, and barrel length. A .22 pistol with 4 inch barrel will have a sound signature of the low to mid 150dB range.

The 140dB isn't a magic number really, as prolonged exposure of less than 140dB sound pressure will still damage hearing, it will just take longer to do. Just because you aren't getting ringing ears doesn't mean damage isn't occurring.

jnyork
July 7, 2010, 04:44 PM
I shoot every week with a group of about 30-35 guys all of whom are over 65 and some over 80. EVERY ONE OF THEM has some hearing problems and a couple are deaf as a stone, all due to not using hearing protection in their younger days in both their professions and their hobbies.

I once met a guy at the range who scoffed at the idea of wearing plugs or muffs for "just a .22". I made some comment, to which he replied "Huh?"

MileHighMan
July 7, 2010, 06:47 PM
There is much more to damaging your hearing than degrees of deafness.

Tinnitus (pronounced /tɪˈnaɪtəs/ or /ˈtɪnɪtəs/,[1] from the Latin word tinnītus meaning "ringing"[2]) is the perception of sound within the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound.

Tinnitus is not a disease, but a symptom resulting from a range of underlying causes that can include: ear infections, foreign objects or wax in the ear, nose allergies that prevent (or induce) fluid drain and cause wax build-up. Tinnitus can also be caused by natural hearing impairment (as in aging), as a side effect of some medications, and as a side effect of genetic (congenital) hearing loss. However, the most common cause for tinnitus is noise-induced hearing loss.

The "one time" you don't use ear protection is more likely to cause damage than the "one time" you don't put on your safety glasses. Your ears, like your knees, lower back and teeth have to last a lifetime.

carnaby
July 7, 2010, 06:57 PM
The only thing I shoot without plugs/muffs is low velocity subsonic .22 shorts. And then, only out of a rifle or with a silencer. I've had tinnitus for years, from loud music and not shooting, and I protect what I've got left.

CraigC
July 7, 2010, 10:27 PM
driving at highway speeds with windows down
Folks don't realize that wind noise can damage your hearing. I realized this after I started riding motorcycles. Always wearing a skull cap, my ears hurt after a long ride and before long, I determined that I indeed had some hearing loss as a result. Folks like to make jokes about wearing ear plugs while riding a Harley but it ain't because of the pipes, it's because of the wind noise.


Simply put, I don't believe the .22 rifles are all that loud when compared to other things we hear in our lives
You will eventually pay for it. Trust me, it ain't worth it, put your muffs on!!!

Tom609
July 7, 2010, 11:10 PM
jcwit, I know exactly what you mean. I have non-shooting related hearing loss and wear bilateral aids too. They are expensive. Some people think it's just a problem that can be corrected by turning up the volume, but it's much more than that. I can no longer tell which direction sounds come from. TV shows with lots of background music make it impossible to hear the dialog. I find myself using the closed captioning more lately. Some people are easy to hear, and others I have to ask to repeat what they said - it's frequency of sound more than volume. I have to sleep with the TV on because dead silence makes the tinnitus too "loud." I also notice a slight affect to my balance. I could go on, but I think you get the idea. All I can say is, wear the friggin ear protection! :)

dmazur
July 7, 2010, 11:27 PM
I learned about hearing loss at work, as part of administering our hearing conservation program.

Yep, 85dB is the threshold, for a TWA of 8hrs. As we have no way of measuring that easily at our workplace, I just require hearing protection for any equipment or area that has a measured noise level above 85dB. We have tags on the equipment and signs up in the areas. The crew carries ear plugs in their pockets, or on cords around their necks, or wears ear muffs (usually for planned excursions into noisy areas). We also have ear plug dispensing areas inside every shop door.

One of the activities that gets a chuckle from visitors is when they see someone running the vacuum cleaner while wearing muffs. Yes, the vacuum cleaner generates over 85 dB.

I use double protection at the range, and electronic muffs while hunting.

(...and I'm over 50 and I can still hear. :) )

deadin
July 7, 2010, 11:57 PM
I will be 69 YO this year. I've been shooting since I was about 14. No protection. Then I spent 20 years in a Stage/Rock band standing in front of high power amplifiers. No protection. (Still shooting on my off hours)
About 15 or 20 years ago I started wearing hearing protection. Just sitting here right now, I have ringing, no, screaming in my ears and I am told that there is nothing that can be done about it.
Luckily I have managed to live with it. Some folks can't.

USE PROTECTION!!!

NMGonzo
July 8, 2010, 12:33 AM
I double up.

Seriously ... both plugs and muffs.

RhinoDefense
July 8, 2010, 02:10 AM
Dmazur, no doubt. I also wear hearing protection when mowing the lawn.

Buzzard
July 8, 2010, 02:45 AM
I've worn ear plugs for the past twelve years. Mowing the lawn, running a vacuum in the house, working on engines of any sort, running power tools louder than a drill (Dremel, circular saw; router gets double-plugged). Anything to save my hearing. People look at me weird when an ambulance goes screaming by and I've got my fingers in my ears. There's a reason: it freakin' HURTS! Guys at work give me grief because I bring my own plugs instead of using the cheap foam ones. My hearing is fine, while some of them are yelling "WHAT!?" halfway through lunch.

When it comes to shooting, I never bothered with hearing protection. Until I started up again a few years ago, all of my shooting had been done while I was a teenager. According to God Himself, teenagers are invincible! So firing .22s or a .50 cal Hawken or even a 30-06 for ten rounds does NOT require hearing protection. No hearing trouble in this fella's head. In fact, I'm usually the one asking other folks whether or not they heard something. Subtle pitch shifts in music or engine notes, odd sounds from the neighbor's place, the A/C compressor kicking on next door; I can hear that stuff. Probably because I've become such a fanatic about protecting my hearing.

Want a set? $3-4, Silencio Blue with the radial fins rated 25dB. Had 'em ten years and they're still workin' fine. For that matter, so are my ears!

General Geoff
July 8, 2010, 02:49 AM
Buzzard, can you hear the high-pitched tone put off by most electronic equipment (TVs, monitors, computers, etc)? I hate that; small price to pay for having superb hearing, though, I guess. And on the plus side, I can tell when someone left the TV on, from the other room, even if it's muted or has no input. :)

Buzzard
July 8, 2010, 02:06 PM
Buzzard, can you hear the high-pitched tone put off by most electronic equipment (TVs, monitors, computers, etc)? I hate that; small price to pay for having superb hearing, though, I guess. And on the plus side, I can tell when someone left the TV on, from the other room, even if it's muted or has no input.

Depends on how long the offending object has been on. TVs tend to whine rather loudly until they've been on for 15 minutes or so, at which point the keening sound almost goes away. Almost. Sometimes I can tell when the TV downstairs is still on even when its muted and I'm upstairs. To be fair, the TV downstairs is almost on top of the staircase so hearing it isn't all that hard. My computer monitor is an old one, and it has never made that keening sound.

I know when various computer parts are trying to fail by the sound they make. Fan bearings especially, but the sounds of a low 12v line on a hard-drive are also obvious once you know what the sound is. For the most part, though, my current computer is very quiet. I can hear my cheap DVD player choking on a bad disc from ten feet (the repeated clicks of the DVDs laser seeker are a dead give-away) and I can hear the clik-clik-clik-clik of a CD player on pause from several feet away. If you really want to go nuts, try sleeping in a room with a clock radio that is on but has the volume set to zero.

And none of this bothers me in the least! I'm glad my hearing works as well as it does, and putting in ear plugs while vacuuming doesn't bother me at all. Though I will occasionally vacuum out the cat brush without 'em. Less than a minute's exposure is okay in my book. Any longer, though... nope, plug up!

Grey Morel
July 8, 2010, 02:27 PM
What will HURT your unprotected ears? Anything greater than a .22 Mag.

What will rob you of your hearing over time? ANY GUN OR CALIBER.

wishin
July 8, 2010, 02:28 PM
Have fun with tinnitus in your later years.

Damage doesn't always result in tinnitus, but nonetheless you will suffer hearing loss. I have a moderate hearing loss from tank guns and firearms and have never experienced any ringing in my ears. Wear hearing protection whenever shooting any caliber.

General Geoff
July 8, 2010, 02:37 PM
Buzzard (and anyone else interested): If you want an interesting benchmark to test your hearing, download a program called Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforge.net/), and insert generated tones of increasing frequency into a sound file, then listen to them with a set of good quality headphones. Healthy young human hearing perception ranges from about 20hz to 18,000hz.

I got all the way up to 17,800hz and could still hear the tone; 17,900 I couldn't distinguish anymore. Not bad for a 25 year old (supposedly only teenagers should be able to hear past 16khz)... also, the average middle aged person can only perceive up to 12 or 14khz (or so the experts say).

CoRoMo
July 8, 2010, 03:14 PM
...I can tell when someone left the TV on... even if it's muted or has no input.
Same here. I've done this dozens of times over my life: Walk into a room and ask someone if I can turn off that TV. They tell me that it is obviously off already because the screen is dark or whatever, but when I hit the power button and they see the screen snap off, they are amazed. I can hear that soft high pitch that it emits.

I really need to get a pair of electronic muffs to use when I'm deer & elk hunting. I just use plugs when I hunt everything else.

oldfool
July 9, 2010, 12:13 AM
don't pay any attention to these silly old farts
if you can hear a mouse fart at 100 yards, don't worry about it
just do your thing
and you will be far less inclined to worry about Grizz and Lion noises and/or the sound of brakes squealing behind you at the stoplight (because you won't hear them anyway)
don't worry, be happy !
live fast, die young (and deaf), and leave a beautiful memory

if replying to this post, please speak a little LOUDER

PS
and do not floss your teeth
(Vegans don't need teeth anyway, and everybody knows by now that red meat is bad for you)

mboylan
July 9, 2010, 09:43 PM
To answer your original question. The muzzle blast from a .22 Hornet is much closer to a .223 than a .22LR. It's loud.

TomTerrific
July 10, 2010, 01:04 AM
Hearing loss is like cancer: once you are aware of it, it's probably too late to do anything about it.

I have unilateral hearing loss in my left ear, probably from driving a lot with the window down. I started driving in 1953 and didn't have a car with a/c until recent decades.

I will say I had tinnitus before my hearing loss became apparent in my annual audiogram at work. We started doing them in 1970, long before the OSHA Hearing Conservation Amendment.

Impact noise is different than continuous noise as a couple of people have pointed out and you need a special meter to measure it. The OSHA exposure limits for it are different than for continuous noise. Also, OSHA standards are not applicable for the general population but are a decent starting point.

Shooting is impact noise. Did you ever shoot a gun and have ringing immediately? That's a sign of damage. Use hearing protection. I seem to get good protection from plugs.

I was a Certified Industrial Hygienist at work and administered my company's Hearing Conservation Program. It is satisfying to see a lot of knowledge of noise and its effects in this thread.

Tom

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One of the advantages of being old is I can ignore people and they think I can't hear them.

benEzra
July 11, 2010, 01:49 PM
Simply put, I don't believe the .22 rifles are all that loud when compared to other things we hear in our lives
What else in your daily life tops 140dB? Unless you work on an aircraft carrier deck or an industrial noise hazard area, probably not much.

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