Tikka Bolt Actions - How Are They ???


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FMJMIKE
July 13, 2010, 08:18 PM
I am considering buying a Tikka bolt action rifle in .223 Remington. Can you tell me more about them. Post some photos too if you don't mind. Thanks...

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jmr40
July 13, 2010, 09:02 PM
They are great shooters. Light weight, great triggers and smooth actions. I had one in 30-06 for a while. Wanted something lighter and sold it to finance a Kimber.

My brother has one in 223 and it is amazingly accurate. I think they are the most accuracy you can get for the money.

If you like to tinker they are not for you. No aftermaket parts available, or needed. Just mount a scope with the supplied rings and go shooting.

Downsides:

Unconventional looks turn some people off.

I ended up replacing the screws in the factory ringmounts. I found they were soft and hex wrenches were slipping when I tried to tighten them. Total cost was under $3.00. A lot of people recommend replacing them with better rings, but I found the $3 I spent on screws made them fine.

Replacement magazines are too expensive ($60-$75) and are hard to find. My brother bought an extended 6 round mag that protrudes about an inch below the stock.

janobles14
July 13, 2010, 09:05 PM
top end tikka rifles are about as good as you get out of the box. i know a small few guys with them and they are excellent rifles. i assume the mid to lower end selections are also pretty darn good too.

Tuckerp229
July 14, 2010, 09:44 AM
I have a Tikka Hunter in the 6.5x55 Swede. Obviously not your caliber but I can give a resounding positive recommendation none the less. They are very accurate out of the box, (I am getting 5/8 to 3/4 inch groups out of mine with reloads). and at least the Hunter is very low priced for what one receives. I did a bit of research and found tat the barrels are identical to the Sako's made right along side in the same factory. The Hunter version is less money by virtue of marketing design. They wanted a price point so they streamlined production and cheapened a few things to hit that lower number. For instance the Hunter has a polymer mag instead of steel. Also they use a tube-drilled receiver instead of the traditional machined received. This is much less costly to make but is something of a frustration to try to single load through the resulting smaller ejection port. Maybe this will mean nothing to you for your use but it is best to know it before you buy.

Buy with confidence.

brianr23
July 14, 2010, 07:25 PM
Nothing but high marks for my T3 lite stainless in .270. .750" 3-shot group at 100yds out of the box with hornady ammo. Can't ask for more. It's only missed once and it wasn't the rifles fault.

MIL-DOT
July 14, 2010, 08:06 PM
I have a T3 lite stainless in .308. and I REALLY lke this rifle. Using Federal Gold Medal Match, this rifle will split hairs.

Charles S
July 14, 2010, 08:12 PM
I love my T3 Lite Stainless in 270. Will shoot almost any ammo into less than inch for 5 shots consistently. Light and easy to carry.

30-06 lover
July 14, 2010, 08:32 PM
For the price, Great Rifle! Very accurate! I love mine!

Like stated before, not a tinkering mans rifle as there is very little aftermarket, but not much to modify if you are looking for a informal range gun or a hunting rifle. Some people get into a twist about the use of plastic for the magazine and trigger guard, but for normal use it will be more than adequate.

I would recommend stainless over the blued...mine is blued and due to the fact mine is a field rifle, it gets wet and seems to rust faster than my other blued guns.

HGUNHNTR
July 14, 2010, 08:35 PM
A+ on the Tikkas, if I needed another bolt action rifle, I would take the Tikka without thought of another make or model. I have had nothing but wonderful experiences with my own.

Buzzard
July 14, 2010, 10:03 PM
Got a Lite Stainless in 6.5x55 on my list. They typically cost around $550 or so, and they're worth double that. A real-live "light-weight" rifle (7.5lbs scoped) that you won't pay college tuition for or have to wait a year to get. Beats the Remchesters hands down in the trigger and accuracy departments, too. T3s are rifles that people love to harp on, but can't really complain about. It ain't US made, the stock is plastic, the bolt is 2-piece; phooey! It'll shoot beautiful groups all day long using a mixed magazine of ammo, and it will not kick the hell out of you in the process despite the low weight. Even Savage can't beat that.

Stop dawdling; buy one!

DIM
July 14, 2010, 10:26 PM
They are great, but there is one draw back, they luck aftermarket parts, things you can add to them, only few replacement stocks for 500 bucks or more, bedding one is another issue no gunsmith around me would take upon it. They remind me TC which are great but there are no one who sells say triggers like jewel or timney so I'm stock with factory trigger with 3.5lb pull... So when you buy one its how its going to be, some people like it this way, but I like to tweak my rifles.

Balrog
July 15, 2010, 12:20 AM
They are pretty good rifles for the money but have a couple of drawbacks.

First, they are all built on long actions. I find it cheesy to put a short action round in a long action rifle.

Second, magazine are expensive, hard to find, and feel and look cheap.

Other than these two things, the ones I have shot are very nice.

stinger 327
July 15, 2010, 01:14 AM
Got the Tikka 3 light in 30.06 right out of the box with the right scope and it does what it advertises 3 inch groups at 100 yards or even better. I have shot 125 grain, 150 grain, 165, 180, and 220 grain Remington Core Loks. Doesn't make a difference they all kick like hell but the sight adjustment is such that I can use any of the above bullets in different weights and still put it in the 3 inch circle at 100 yards.:D

skoro
July 15, 2010, 12:37 PM
I'll cast the dissenting vote here.

A couple of years ago, I was looking at getting a bolt action centerfire and I'd read all the good things about the Tikka, so was intrigued. Went to the local gunshops and handled a couple. The actions were smooth, it's true. But the overall impression I got was that the T3 is a gun that Tikka/Sako cut every possible corner on in terms of materials and production. It just looked and felt cheap. That was my take. I know T3 owners report very good accuracy and seem to be pleased with their rifles. It just didn't resonate with me, is all.

I went with a Weatherby Vanguard instead. No regrets.

willymike
July 15, 2010, 12:51 PM
I voted my money on the Tikka T3 three times, and a Tikka White Tail Hunter once. All my T3s are the wood stocked Hunter model. These rifles shoot with superb accuracy. They also handle better for me than almost anything else out there.

natman
July 15, 2010, 12:53 PM
I'll cast the dissenting vote here.

A couple of years ago, I was looking at getting a bolt action centerfire and I'd read all the good things about the Tikka, so was intrigued. Went to the local gunshops and handled a couple. The actions were smooth, it's true. But the overall impression I got was that the T3 is a gun that Tikka/Sako cut every possible corner on in terms of materials and production. It just looked and felt cheap. That was my take. I know T3 owners report very good accuracy and seem to be pleased with their rifles. It just didn't resonate with me, is all.

I went with a Weatherby Vanguard instead. No regrets.
You're right. The Tikka IS a gun that Sako cut costs on. That's why you can get a rifle with the same barrels that go on Sakos for hundreds of dollars less.

Sure they could have used fancier parts, better wood, etc, but then guess what? - it would cost as much as a Sako.

Horsemany
July 15, 2010, 08:55 PM
I preferred the T3 to the Sako 85 for a number of reasons. My Sakos have gone down the road in favor of T3's and Browning X-Bolts.

ArtP
July 15, 2010, 09:18 PM
I have a Tikka T3 in .243 and love mine. I'm the kind of guy to second guess buying decisions, and this is one I haven't second guessed. I am using the factory rings with a fine scope and no trouble.

I'll also say with handloads I can get 1/2 inch groups, 1 inch groups with factory stuff. It has an awesome trigger that needs no adjustment and the bolt is silky smooth. I too heavily considered the Vanguard, but ruled it out after the creepy trigger. I also considered a CZ but the weight of the 550 in a 243 didn't make sense.

My only dislike is the small ejection port which too small to load a single round by hand without gravity helping out and also too small to stick a finger in the throat for a "feel check" to make sure the rifle is empty. Maybe it's just me, but I double check, to verify the rifle is indeed unloaded - visual, then stick a finger down the throat. However, I think the small ejection ports adds to the regidity of the action, helping accuracy.

I'll add one other thing. Perhaps it's luck, but both scopes I've had mounted needed no windage adjustment from their centers. Meaning the scope mounting holes lined up perfect with the barrel. Never seen that before.

mshootnit
July 15, 2010, 10:47 PM
I don't have a Tikka but my friend has a tikki torch and it does work pretty good.

stinger 327
July 15, 2010, 11:40 PM
I have a Tikka T3 in .243 and love mine. I'm the kind of guy to second guess buying decisions, and this is one I haven't second guessed. I am using the factory rings with a fine scope and no trouble.

I'll also say with handloads I can get 1/2 inch groups, 1 inch groups with factory stuff. It has an awesome trigger that needs no adjustment and the bolt is silky smooth. I too heavily considered the Vanguard, but ruled it out after the creepy trigger. I also considered a CZ but the weight of the 550 in a 243 didn't make sense.

My only dislike is the small ejection port which too small to load a single round by hand without gravity helping out and also too small to stick a finger in the throat for a "feel check" to make sure the rifle is empty. Maybe it's just me, but I double check, to verify the rifle is indeed unloaded - visual, then stick a finger down the throat. However, I think the small ejection ports adds to the regidity of the action, helping accuracy.

I'll add one other thing. Perhaps it's luck, but both scopes I've had mounted needed no windage adjustment from their centers. Meaning the scope mounting holes lined up perfect with the barrel. Never seen that before.
In my search I compared the CZ-550, Vanguard, lower cost models like the Savage and Remington that already had scopes included in purchase. The Tikka 3 Lite had the smoothest action felt the best with ease of handling and was the lightest
in 30.06 caliber.

sleepyone
July 15, 2010, 11:46 PM
Very accurate rifles and a great value, but they have too much plastic and no soul. +1 on the parts and magazines being expensive and hard to find. I don't want any deer rifle that uses magazines. You lose it or it breaks in the field and you are down to a single shot rifle.

stinger 327
July 15, 2010, 11:49 PM
Very accurate rifles and a great value, but they have too much plastic and no soul. +1 on the parts and magazines being expensive and hard to find. I don't want any deer rifle that uses magazines. You lose it or it breaks in the field and you are down to a single shot rifle.
In 30.06 each 5 shot mag if I remember correctly cost $69.95

stinger 327
July 15, 2010, 11:52 PM
One thing I like about the Mauser design over these pushers is the control you have over the cartridge and ejection.
With the Tikka being a pusher type if you go against the law of gravity in a funny shooting position the cartridge will fall out of the loading port.

The Mauser grabbed the cartridge so this wouldn't happen. Something that was considered in the military.

psyopspec
July 16, 2010, 12:32 AM
I've been hunting and target shooting with my T3 in .243 for about 16 years now. Dad bought it as a deer rifle, and when I started shooting it as a kid I just had to make it my own.

Smooth action. I can't speak to MOA, but I've hit quarters at the 200 yard range with it. This was when I was ~15-16, ammo was cheap, and I was going to the range 3x per week for a couple hours after school. Christ, those were the days...

Fumbler
July 16, 2010, 01:18 AM
the overall impression I got was that the T3 is a gun that Tikka/Sako cut every possible corner on in terms of materials and production

You're right. The Tikka IS a gun that Sako cut costs on. That's why you can get a rifle with the same barrels that go on Sakos for hundreds of dollars less.

Sure they could have used fancier parts, better wood, etc, but then guess what? - it would cost as much as a Sako.
That's exactly it. They put the money you pay into the parts that count.
A great barrel with a well fitted bolt and a pretty darn good trigger. That's all you get.
There's no soul, just pure performance.
People can talk all the junk they want about the plastic, but it works. No one's ever heard of the plastic breaking or the mags misfeeding.

It's a low cost bolt action. When you have limited funds you can't gripe too much.
If you buy a 700 because it feels and looks good then don't complain if it doesn't shoot well.
If you buy a T3 because you want an accurate gun then don't complain if it feels cheap.

I personally like the styling and don't mind the plastic.
I wanted an accurate lightweight gun but can't spend the extra $2-300, so I got a T3.
It's a great gun that, with scope, weighs in less than a regular model 700 without a scope. It also shoots 1MOA or better with any premium factory ammo I've tried and comes close with cheap factory ammo. The first time I loaded some SMKs over a starting load of Varget I shot a 0.75MOA 5 shot group.

It is what it is. It's ok if someone doesn't like the T3 because they prefer the feel of a heavier gun with a blind magazine, but people cannot honestly say a T3 isn't worth what you pay for it.

ArtP
July 16, 2010, 01:49 AM
I'll also add to Fumbler by saying the plastic that is there is done pretty well. There are no mold lines like you find on some cheaper guns (synthetic model 70 for example, on the trigger guard). And despite the mag being plastic, it's feels very sturdy and seems built to very close tolerances.

There are pros and cons to push/control feed. At the range, a control feed can be a nuisance as it prevents you from hand loading a round into the chamber - got to go through the mag first.

Back to the plastic. All of our beloved American trucks have become rolling plastic and vinyl and only the first few years did anyone gripe. Now it's accepted without second thought. I'm not advocating plastic, it was a trade off for me. I did not want a heavy rifle in .243. If I were going with a heavy caliber I probably would have gone with the heavier CZ, not knowing how accurate the Tikka would turn out to be.

Snow Dog
July 16, 2010, 02:09 AM
My buddy shot this 5 round group with his T3 Varmint in 6.5x55 - box stock rifle, good glass, carefull handloads and a steady bench.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v294/robs42mb/GroupP.jpg

Horsemany
July 16, 2010, 07:38 AM
One thing I like about the Mauser design over these pushers is the control you have over the cartridge and ejection.
With the Tikka being a pusher type if you go against the law of gravity in a funny shooting position the cartridge will fall out of the loading port.

The Mauser grabbed the cartridge so this wouldn't happen. Something that was considered in the military.


Not true in the case of the Tikka. The single stack magazine holds the case as it's slid forward. By the time the back of the case is loose from the magazine the front of the case is already partially chambered. I've played around with mine quite a bit trying to make it hiccup but I can't.

stinger 327
July 16, 2010, 11:49 AM
Not true in the case of the Tikka. The single stack magazine holds the case as it's slid forward. By the time the back of the case is loose from the magazine the front of the case is already partially chambered. I've played around with mine quite a bit trying to make it hiccup but I can't.
I know because it happened to me.

Horsemany
July 16, 2010, 03:48 PM
It would be a challenge to make the cartridge fall out of the loading port on a Tikka. Even loading slooooww I cannot make it happen on my guns unless I pull the bolt back once the cartridge is loose from the magazine. What you're describing is not a common problem among Tikka's or any other push feed design.

aubie515
July 16, 2010, 07:45 PM
Tikka actions are incredible, but I found their accuracy to be so-so. I owned a T3 Lite in .270 and .308 and they shot ok. If there was aftermarket support, I would have kept them and had new barrels installed.

The tactical versions are suppose to be better.

stinger 327
July 17, 2010, 05:13 AM
Tikka actions are incredible, but I found their accuracy to be so-so. I owned a T3 Lite in .270 and .308 and they shot ok. If there was aftermarket support, I would have kept them and had new barrels installed.

The tactical versions are suppose to be better.
What kind of $$$ are we talkin about on the tacticals?

jayzone1239er
October 9, 2010, 09:18 PM
i have the tikka super varmint stainless in .223 and is is the best gun i have ever shot. my brother has the rem 700 and i have shot lots of savages and ruger m77s. i dont hate any but overall my tikka will do the most for the money. it has a 1:8 twist and i didnt think it would do well with 50 grn bullets but i was really impressed when i bought 52 grn black hills ammo and shot sub moa. i have used it all and the only ammo that i couldnt say would shoot sub moa is cheap amer. eagle tactical 55 grn bullets

stinger 327
October 9, 2010, 09:25 PM
i have the tikka super varmint stainless in .223 and is is the best gun i have ever shot. my brother has the rem 700 and i have shot lots of savages and ruger m77s. i dont hate any but overall my tikka will do the most for the money. it has a 1:8 twist and i didnt think it would do well with 50 grn bullets but i was really impressed when i bought 52 grn black hills ammo and shot sub moa. i have used it all and the only ammo that i couldnt say would shoot sub moa is cheap amer. eagle tactical 55 grn bullets
As claimed by Beretta I get 3 inch groups at 100 yards on the Tikka Lite in 30.06.

Coal Dragger
October 9, 2010, 09:51 PM
Tikka makes a good rifle, my only complaint with them is I don't care for their synthetic stocks very much. Since I am not a big fan of wood on a rifle that is going to get used, that means that all a Tikka really needs for me is a laid up fiberglass stock with a bedding block. Mostly just to stiffen up the fore end for use with a shooting sling.

Otherwise the Tikka offers a good barrel, smooth solid action, and a very fine trigger with no gimmicks or other unneeded garbage on the rifle.

stinger 327
October 9, 2010, 09:58 PM
Tikka makes a good rifle, my only complaint with them is I don't care for their synthetic stocks very much. Since I am not a big fan of wood on a rifle that is going to get used, that means that all a Tikka really needs for me is a laid up fiberglass stock with a bedding block. Mostly just to stiffen up the fore end for use with a shooting sling.

Otherwise the Tikka offers a good barrel, smooth solid action, and a very fine trigger with no gimmicks or other unneeded garbage on the rifle.
Just today I saw a tikka "Exclusive" which has a fluted or ribbed barrel which adds about $100 to price.

WDEala45
October 11, 2010, 11:34 PM
...

WDEala45
October 11, 2010, 11:38 PM
Tikka's are fantastic rifles.

Of course, they are considered the "little brother" of Sako, but hardly perform at a lesser level. They consisently test at 5-6 shot MOA, but are listed as 3-shot to preserve the integrity of Sako, the parent company (which actually test in the 8-9 shot MOA).

In addition, the Tikka lugs are outfitted with 2 bolts, as opposed to the 3 you'll find in a Sako. You're splitting hairs for average use. Either way, you won't be disappointed, nor will you "outshoot" this gun in any time of southeastern hunting scenario.

They are both cold-hammer forged and free floated barrels, widely considered the best in the industry.

Hope this helps.

stinger 327
October 11, 2010, 11:49 PM
Tikka's are fantastic rifles.

Of course, they are considered the "little brother" of Sako, but hardly perform at a lesser level. They consisently test at 5-6 shot MOA, but are listed as 3-shot to preserve the integrity of Sako, the parent company (which actually test in the 8-9 shot MOA).

In addition, the Tikka lugs are outfitted with 2 bolts, as opposed to the 3 you'll find in a Sako. You're splitting hairs for average use. Either way, you won't be disappointed, nor will you "outshoot" this gun in any time of southeastern hunting scenario.

They are both cold-hammer forged and free floated barrels, widely considered the best in the industry.

Hope this helps.

:):D

Uncle Mike
October 12, 2010, 12:23 AM
Good enough for the money you'll spend, If you can get by the euro look and are not a dyed in the wool steel only guy it may do you well.

They balance well, and the stocks seem to fit most folks, as for the accuracy of a Tikka, I have never, shot-in one at the shop, or have seen a Tikka do better than an inch or so at 100y with factory ammo. I'm not there hasn't been, or it will never happen, just that I have not witnessed it, and we sell quite a few of them, about a third of those we sell, we will set-up for the customer.

They are a pretty nice rifle.

TexasPatriot.308
October 13, 2010, 11:30 AM
My T3 lite stainless in 6.5 x 55 is sweet, yep magazines are outrageous so dont lose yours, again cdnn investments has some reall nice replacement stocks for this rifle, only ones and cheapest ones I could find..and the caliber is just right for me, low recoil this old hunter likes and deals many a big hog misery...

dougwx12
October 13, 2010, 11:51 AM
Tikkas are the Glocks of the rifle world. (I love 'em.)

45crittergitter
October 26, 2010, 09:25 PM
I have a couple of Tikkas, and couldn't be happier.

JDMorris
October 26, 2010, 09:36 PM
Was recently considering. chose Howa. better reviews. insanely accurate.

rbernie
October 26, 2010, 10:39 PM
My T3s are more accurate than my Howa/Vanguards, and a WHOLE lot lighter. The weight difference may not be a huge deal in a stand or on a bench, but if you carry the rifle afield a lot you'll appreciate the pound and a half less that the Tikka weighs over the equivalent Howa.

I also find the finish and smoothness of the T3 to be better than most any other mass-produced rifle, and the trigger is superb (and better than the Howa by a whole bunch).

Welding Rod
October 26, 2010, 11:46 PM
I bought a T3 30-06 about 2 years ago. It was a nice rifle but the accuracy was nothing to shout about. I figured that if all it was going to shoot was 1 1/2 - 1 3/4 or so, I may as well own an American built Ruger. So I traded it in on one.

p5200
October 26, 2010, 11:52 PM
I love my Tikka t3 lite in 25-06 great shooter and since every, Tikka has to shoot moa or less before they leave the factory, their prices are hard to beat. :)

stinger 327
October 27, 2010, 03:15 AM
Tikkas are the Glocks of the rifle world. (I love 'em.)
This is very comforting to know. Reliable.

smartshot
October 27, 2010, 05:44 AM
the 30-06 tikka that I shot put 5 handloads into half inch at 100 yards. bolt is smooth as butter

coug
October 27, 2010, 12:14 PM
man im sure I would go another route. did you look at some of the groups they posted .75 all the way to 3 inchs my dad had one in .223 and couldn't make it shoot better than .75 I would go with savage if I wanted .5 :r less for cheap.

surjimmy
October 27, 2010, 05:07 PM
I have a Tikka T3 in a 300wsm. One of the best if not the best weapon's I have ever fired. Using factory ammo, can put 3 shots inside a nickle at 100 yards. Action is very smooth and is as accurate as they come.

ms6852
October 27, 2010, 06:38 PM
Have one in a 30-06. You won't be disappointed. Take a leap of faith and buy it now.

stinger 327
October 27, 2010, 07:16 PM
Tikka 3 has the smoothest action.

BrocLuno
November 13, 2010, 11:53 PM
I just went to Cabellas new big store outside Reno and asked about a Tikka Lite in 308. They haven't sold many and they took a minute to find one (they had three). OK the light sage/snow camo plastic stock was a bit off-putting, but that baby was S-M-O-O-T-H beyond whatever else I have handled in the last few years. Felt as lite as a feather and came to shoulder like a bird gun. I'm sold - now to rob the piggy bank and go shopping :)

Kachok
November 14, 2010, 12:38 AM
There are plenty of rifles that are accurate off a benchrest, but the tikka is also accurate in the real world, the light, crisp trigger, and light overall weight makes them easy to shoot standing, kneeling or any position I find myself in. My T3 Stainless in 6.5x55 is the pride of my collection, I would not trade it for any rifle in the world. It shoots everything very well even cheap Serbian ammo touches holes at 100 yards. The ONLY thing wrong with my T3 is that it is too good! All my friends constantly want to borrow it, I have owned and shot dozons of firearms including many high end rifles and none of them handle, cycle, or shoot as well as my Tikka. So yeah I recomend them to say the least.

o0ben0o
November 14, 2010, 04:24 AM
I have a T3 stainless Super Varmint in .223 rem and a T3 stainless Varmint in 7mm Rem Mag. The .223 shoots half inch groups with most factory stuff, to the point where I havent bothered starting reloading for it yet. The 7mm also shoots under an inch reliably with factory ammo. Im seriously thinking on trading my 7mm Ruger M77 MK2 and 25-06 Ruger Hawkeye for a stainless T3 in 6.5x55. The two Rugers I have are way out classed by the Tikkas I have.

Charles S
November 14, 2010, 01:55 PM
My T3 Stainless in 6.5x55 is the pride of my collection, I would not trade it for any rifle in the world. It shoots everything very well even cheap Serbian ammo touches holes at 100 yards.

I love my T3 270, but I really want a 6.5X55!

stinger 327
November 14, 2010, 01:56 PM
In the Tikka 3 light in 30.06 I use 150 grain and the 220 grain and am still able to put it right in at 100 yards at same sight adjustment.

Kachok
November 14, 2010, 04:55 PM
Hey Charles S I found my T3 stainless 6.5x55 for only $408, you want me to check if they are still runing that sale?

stormspotter
November 14, 2010, 08:39 PM
This afternoon I took a nice 8 pointer with my Tikka T3 223 Remington. Handload was WW brass and primer, BL-C(2) powder and a Sierra 65 grain Gameking. One shot, at about 80 yards, to the base of his neck and he went down and never got up. I know many say the 223 is not a deer crtridge, but I pick my shots and never had one run more than 5 yards.

Tikkas 1 in 8 inch twist will shoot most bullets well. Sierras 52 grain BTHP will shoot into less than an inch at 100 yards.


Sierra loading information here http://accurateshooter.net/Downloads/sierra223rembolt.pdf

racine
November 15, 2010, 11:18 PM
I ordered one last week in stainless and 308 cal. I'm hoping to use it this winter if I find the time to slim down some of the local deer population here in MS. I'll post feedback as soon as I zero it. I matched it with a Nikon 4-12X 40 BDC scope and hope the supplied rings work. Thanks again...

stinger 327
November 15, 2010, 11:26 PM
I ordered one last week in stainless and 308 cal. I'm hoping to use it this winter if I find the time to slim down some of the local deer population here in MS. I'll post feedback as soon as I zero it. I matched it with a Nikon 4-12X 40 BDC scope and hope the supplied rings work. Thanks again...
I really like the Nikon scopes so I bought 3 of them 2 with the BDC Bushmasters and one Prostaff.

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