Aligning recipes with components


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smurf hunter
July 29, 2010, 06:00 PM
Hi,

So I'm looking to lower the cost of my plinking and practice rounds, and am seriously considering some cast bullets for my GP100. Per unit they are 1/2 the cost of Hornady JHP bullets. Problem is I don't see recipes for the powder I have and those cast bullets.

I suppose I can buy some more traditional powder that is published for cast bullets, but it'd be nice to have some flexibility.

For example, I've got the Lyman 49th ed. manual. Great book, but it does not contain data for Winchester AutoComp powder. Luckily hodgdon.com does list that powder - but it has a more limited set of projectiles listed.

Thoughts?

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243winxb
July 29, 2010, 06:19 PM
What caliber? 327 or 357 ? Using powders you already have is not always the best way to go. For 357mag, a standard load for a 158gr lswc is Alliant 2400 - 13.0gr. Your choice of std or mag. primers. Luckily hodgdon.com does list that powder (AutoComp)- but it has a more limited set of projectiles listed. 357 mag.> 3 lead bullets, not bad. Go with the 158gr. start at 5.0gr of AutoComp and work up to max. Its a place to start.

l3uster
July 29, 2010, 06:22 PM
38 or 357?

Bottom of this (http://petloads.com/members/search_detail.cfm?MetallicID=4349&caliber=.38&caliberid=20&header=.38%20Caliber%20Reloading%20Data) page has some AutoComp 38spl loads with cast bullets.

jcwit
July 29, 2010, 06:23 PM
I would use data for jacketed bullets with a weight and bearing area as close as I could get in lead. Also start at low biging charges. Folks may flame me for this, but this is what I would do.

Don't start out at max loads.

Sidewinder72
July 29, 2010, 06:40 PM
I would buy some W 231 and load per manuals on cast bullets, not jacketed. Lots of load data for W 231. Play it safe.

jcwit
July 29, 2010, 07:19 PM
Not to argue, but why? Its easier to start a lead bullet with the same weight & bearing length than a jacketed bullet. I've done this for years in various calibers when unable to find data for a certain powder.

Please explain.

smurf hunter
July 29, 2010, 08:26 PM
357 is my preferred reload, though I have some 38spl brass I've experimented with. In a GP100 I'm generally not afraid of a hot 38spl load.

Suppose I have in possession 158gr lead bullets - let's say LSWC

When a recipe calls for the same weight, but different bullet (158gr JHP, 158gr LRN, etc.) - what will work and what will not work?

factors I can think of:

1) bearing surface
2) bearing material
3) gas checked/jacketed at the base

I'm mainly concerned about safety and basic functionality. I'm not concerned about losing a little velocity compared to what the recipe stated.

jcwit
July 29, 2010, 08:33 PM
Start on the light end and work up. I see no problem. Watch for pressure signs.

You've got a strong revolver there.

Gadzooks Mike
July 29, 2010, 11:34 PM
I would use data for jacketed bullets with a weight and bearing area as close as I could get in lead.

I agree with jcwit. As long as you're starting on the low end, there is absolutely no problem.

bds
July 29, 2010, 11:42 PM
357 is my preferred reload, though I have some 38spl brass I've experimented with. In a GP100 I'm generally not afraid of a hot 38spl load.
Someone suggested loading 357 cases with 38 bullets and powder charges to minimize fouling in the cylinder. ;)

243winxb
July 30, 2010, 07:42 AM
What cast bullets do you have, that you want to work up a load with, using the Winchester AutoComp powder?

jcwit
July 30, 2010, 10:27 AM
What cast bullets do you have, that you want to work up a load with, using the Winchester AutoComp powder?


Thats what was implied in the first post.

Someone suggested loading 357 cases with 38 bullets and powder charges to minimize fouling in the cylinder.

I usually do this with .357, keeps from having the carbon rings in the cylinders.

Walkalong
July 30, 2010, 10:39 AM
I always use .357 cases for light .38 type loads in .357 revolvers. Nothing wrong with shooting .38 cases in them, but that is just how I do it. Some of my "medium" .357 loads are more in the .38 +P and more range, so I would rather they were in .357 cases to keep them out of .38's.

smurf hunter
July 30, 2010, 12:25 PM
I was considering a bulk order from Missouri bullet (http://www.missouribullet.com/results.php?category=5&secondary=10)

ljnowell
July 30, 2010, 12:42 PM
Smurf, I run the 158gr SWC from Missouri Bullet over 14.5gr of 2400. Very accurate and powerful, and well within SAAMI spec.

243winxb
July 30, 2010, 01:27 PM
I was considering a bulk order from Missouri bullet So then, what the :cuss: is the problem. Buy a bullet that Hodgdon has data for, 158gr lead, lead is lead, RN, SWC or WC, using your powder(AutoComp) 357 mag.> 3 lead bullets, not bad. Go with the 158gr. start at 5.0gr of AutoComp and work up to max. Its a place to start. < As i said before :cuss:

Steve C
July 30, 2010, 01:51 PM
Charge weights being equal a lead bullet will produce a higher velocity than a jacketed bullet. Depending upon bullet hardness, size and the particular bore and throat sizes of your revolver, this can produce mild to severe leading in your bore.

Its usually easy to find lead bullet data but if using jacketed data it would be best to begin at a 20% reduction from maximum as a start load for lead and consider the jacketed start load to be maximum. My chrono results show that the start load (-10%) in jacketed data will produce velocities equal to a full power jacketed bullet when using lead. Main reason for this is that lead has less bullet to bore resistance than a jacketed bullet so it slides down the bore easier.

The one caveat is H110/W296 where you will not be able to reduce the load less than 3% below maximum without risking squibs.

Since you can't predict if you will have leading issues its best to find lead data for your powder or buy a different more appropriate one and work up your loads rather than just arbitrarily picking a load.

Loading lead takes a more load development to get it right but when you find a load that works for you it will save money and be quite rewarding.

smurf hunter
July 30, 2010, 03:13 PM
Thank you Steve.

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