gun laws on military bases


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Revolver Ocelot
July 29, 2010, 06:10 PM
I'm about to go to ft wainwright for my first duty station, I have just found out that I cannot have my guns in my home. I'm hoping someone here would be able to explain the logic to this and possibly someone who has found themselves in a similar situation that is aware of a legal way around it.

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Mags
July 29, 2010, 06:17 PM
I have just found out that I cannot have my guns in my home. I don't know if that is true if you are going to be living in the family housing area. Normally if living in the barrack you have to keep your guns in the arms room or armory. If you live in family housing you normally ar allowed to keep your guns on base in your home providing they are registered with the base police.

I have been in the AF for 9 years and counting granted the services do differ on some things, it is always best to ask your gaining First Seargeant or MP liason office.

Revolver Ocelot
July 29, 2010, 06:24 PM
thank you for the info, I'll be sure to look that up to double check

rscalzo
July 29, 2010, 06:35 PM
A friend had a similar situation here in NH. The base commander does not allow any privately owns firearms on the base...period. There is mo base housing as it is a combined use field.

valorius
July 29, 2010, 06:54 PM
That is a lawsuit waiting to happen. How can a base commander void an inalienable right?

The Lone Haranguer
July 29, 2010, 07:17 PM
If you live on the base, what the commanding officer says, goes.

mljdeckard
July 29, 2010, 07:21 PM
When you are a servicemember, all of your rights are allowed at the discretion of your command. And I do mean ALL. Every person who is considering the armed forces must learn this.

We have discussed this at length. When I was on orders in CA, I didn't even take mine, between **********'s laws and command requirements to register, I decided it wasn't worth it. When I went TDY to TX, it was still silly. I drove to the post, unloaded before I entered, went to the police station during certain hours to sign it in, had to have my cdr read me the Lautenberg act, (He asked me if I had any problems with it, I said; "Mostly just that it exists, sir.")

Your best bet is off-post housing in a gun-friendly state. That minimizes how much the army can mess with your private life and your rights. But remember, he always has the option to revoke your off-post priviliges and move you into the barracks. Just tattoo a big U.S. on your tookus, that's who owns it now. :)

Shadow 7D
July 29, 2010, 07:35 PM
Alaska is, the posts were, but stupid people doing stupid things messed it up.

Blackbeard
July 29, 2010, 07:52 PM
That is a lawsuit waiting to happen. How can a base commander void an inalienable right?

You don't even have free speech in the military. You give up your "rights" when you sign up.

shootistpd27
July 29, 2010, 07:58 PM
You have to check your guns in on most bases. You cant even have bullets. The funny thing is is that the honest guy turns his guns in hoping not to get into trouble. Your vehicle is never searched unless you really screw up. There are many civilians as well as hot headed military personell on the base. That means that the honest person doesnt have a weapon, but the dishonest and dangerous folks who want to do you harm, can simply drive onto the base with guns and bombs and NOT tell civilian security, and the honest guy gets the crap shot out of him without a weapon to return fire. Look at what happened a Fort Hood. They had a base full of trained soldiers but they were not trusted to have weapons except in combat. Do you think that the guy would have tried what he did had every soldier been armed?

JoeSlomo
July 29, 2010, 08:01 PM
Most post's have a web site these days with a link to the post policy. Check it out.

Military command tends to be anti-firearm ...go figure. And heaven forbid you want to own and ride a motorcycle.

Welcome to the "New age" military where "leadership" is now looked at more like baby sitting.

valorius
July 29, 2010, 10:22 PM
If you live on the base, what the commanding officer says, goes.
If you live in the US, what the US constitution says, goes.

Heller affirmed the right of Americans to keep a handgun in their home for defense. Soldiers are Americans, and if that home is on US soil...SCOTUS has spoken.

The soldiers there should file suit. You only give up some rights as a soldier. I was one once too- and we were allowed to have all the personal guns and bullets we wanted, they just had to be checked into the armorer if you were in the barracks. If you were in on post housing you could have all the loaded guns you wanted. This was a couple decades ago, but still...

scythefwd
July 30, 2010, 04:59 AM
Joeslomo - Every post I was stationed at only required that you have the MSF BRC or ERC and a license. My post offered them even. Motorcycles aren't a big issue.

Tim the student
July 30, 2010, 05:50 AM
If you live on the base, what the commanding officer says, goes.

As long as they are lawful orders, they apply all the time, regardless of where you are. Of course, you may choose not to follow them, but that is a different matter.

06
July 30, 2010, 05:52 AM
Some posts require registration of firearms for on base homes and some don't bother. Like another said--the base commander has the say so. What do you think G.I. stands for--you are theirs for the duration of your "hitch".

robhof
July 30, 2010, 06:59 AM
The going gun free on bases was the result of extended war deployments(where guns were carried regularly and used often). Problems started arising when conflicts erupted stateside and guns were available, started during the Vietnam era. I reviewed some psychological papers done by Army psychs on the issue. Of course; wasn't that crazy Arab killer on the Army base recently an Army shrink???

luigi
July 30, 2010, 08:42 AM
If you live in the US, what the US constitution says, goes.

That only applies if you choose to fight it. In most of the commands I was ever assigned to it would have meant the end of your career win, lose, or draw.

When I was assigned to the 4th ID the Division Commander’s ( MG Guy La Boa) policy was dirt simple E4 and below regardless of housing situation could not own a firearm period. You can argue the fine legal points all day long the fact is he did it.

In other cases you may be required to store your weapons in the unit arms room which means that the unit armorer will have more access to your weapon than you will. It also means (in most cases) that you would need permission from your CO to get the weapon out of the arms room and that the unit armorer would have to be willing to come in on his off time to sign it out to you (clearly, you wouldn’t be signing it out during duty hours). It also means he'd have to come back in to sign it in. Let us know how that works out for you.

I would leave the firearms home until you got to your permanent station and had a chance to get a feel for the unit you’ll be assigned to. If at all possible I would move off post at my earliest opportunity and never mention the fact that I own firearms to anyone in my COC or NCO Support Chain.

I would also have a plan to get the firearms to my permanent home in the event of a deployment

Bubbles
July 30, 2010, 09:05 AM
If you are in the Army there are often discussions in the Second Amendment forum on AKO about the firearm policies on each base.

MEHavey
July 30, 2010, 09:07 AM
Please see

http://www.wainwright.army.mil/publications/scr/fwaGarPolicyletters/fwa_garrison_policy_19_21jul09.pdf

As a former base commander, I was doubtful that an outright ban on private firearms was in effect (even after Ft Hood). The Commander's policy letter above implements the security reqm'ts I expected: (1) No firearms in the barracks or BOQs. (Reason: too many people/maids/maintenance/cleaning have access). (2) Firearms in family quarters are permitted, in an unloaded/secured condition. (3) All on-base weapons will be registered at the Provost Marshal's. (4) Troops living in barracks can store their weapons/ammo at that same Provost's, and can check them out at will.

Don't get too exercised about the latter. When I checked in at Edwards many (many) years back, I rolled up to the Provost's and went inside to tell them I had some weapons to store w/ them. "How many?" they asked. "Bring a cart," was my reply with a wry smile.

luigi
July 30, 2010, 09:10 AM
To MEHavey
Are you the guy that forbade all active duty in Alaska from carrying concealed ?

MEHavey
July 30, 2010, 09:19 AM
Not hardly. Can you post a link to where we can see whether this is an outright ban, or a ban while on post, and/or whether something recent? (The last thing I saw concerning an outright ban was dated more than four years ago.)

(Note that Para 2.f. in the link above says no Concealed while on post.)

Art Eatman
July 30, 2010, 10:09 AM
The link in Post #19 seems to answer the opening question...

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