Lubricating My AR


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SkinnyGrey
August 2, 2010, 09:17 PM
I have an S&W M&P 15. I have noticed that if I don't lubricate it often I have some cycling problems. I cleaned and oiled it about a month ago and then when I tried firing it the a month later it started short stroking. Then I oiled it and it worked fine. How often should I lube it? Does lube tend to dry up over the course of a few weeks?

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nipprdog
August 2, 2010, 09:35 PM
when I tried firing it the a month later it started short stroking

What ammo were you using?

Z-Michigan
August 2, 2010, 09:58 PM
How it's running will guide you as to how often to lubricate it. Also many are a bit tight when new and loosen up with some use.

Some lubes do dry up, but most commonly if you're using oil (which is generally the choice for an AR) and you store the rifle vertically sitting on the buttstock, a lot of that oil drains out of the action and into the buffer tube where it does no good. One option is to store it lying on its side, if that's an option (won't fit that way in most safes!). Another is simply to lube it prior to each use.

There are some lubes that don't dry up or run off, and the debate of what's good and what isn't is one of those typically running, never-ending forum debates.

My personal approach, which is worth what you paid for it, is to coat all metal parts first with Boeshield T-9, primarily as a protectant but also as a backup lube, and then after it dries oil all the moving surfaces. But I don't know if this actually works better than using the oil by itself.

gb0399
August 2, 2010, 10:06 PM
I only use CLP. I like it, it works great for me, never had any issues.

By the way, if you do a search, you should find a half dozen threads on this topic.

Mags
August 2, 2010, 10:09 PM
I clean and lube after every range session, and when I get to the range I dump some oil in again. My ARs love to run wet.

FastMover
August 2, 2010, 10:13 PM
I only use CLP. I like it, it works great for me, never had any issues.

By the way, if you do a search, you should find a half dozen threads on this topic.

+1 & +1

My rifle requires a periodic drizzle of CLP for proper function.

taliv
August 2, 2010, 10:22 PM
use a better lube like slip2000 ewl or machinegunners lube and it will stay put longer. or use a cheap lube more often.

DougW
August 2, 2010, 10:31 PM
If it is new, run it wet for the first 200 or so rounds. Clean and lub it as normal, and it will run fine.

f4t9r
August 2, 2010, 10:35 PM
mine run fine when wet,
I most likely over lube everything but everything works, so I'm good

killchain
August 2, 2010, 11:02 PM
If it comes out to play, it gets some lubrication.

A short spritz of Break Free (CLP) into the open chamber will do it right every time.

janobles14
August 3, 2010, 12:14 AM
<edited>

but its true. theres a reason the old military joke was to get you load up your rifle with a BIG snort of CLP then pop off a round. nothing like warm CLP to the face...but no one's bitter! :)

in all seriousness though, M4's are meant to be run wet. it helps with most every facet of operation. it seals, it glides, it reduces the friction. it helps with extraction, it shines, it buffs, it stops rust, gout, and the occasional bout of the flu.

WYcoyote
August 3, 2010, 12:28 AM
I use Mobil 1 10w30. Stays wet with great lube quality.
Like the others said, wet is good.

Shadow 7D
August 3, 2010, 12:37 AM
Now, in the desert, she is a nasty b, and must be kept bone dry (why Mil 1, mil spec etc.)

BUT

Once you start shooting you have to get her wet fast or you run into huge problems :)
<edited>

benEzra
August 3, 2010, 12:40 AM
Try some different ammo (what you have could be underpowered), try a Magpul PMAG magazine, and also check that the gas key on top of the bolt carrier isn't loose, as a loose key can cause short stroking. If it is fine, I would shoot the rifle a bit with the different ammo and mag and see if the problem goes away. AR's like to be well lubricated, particularly when dirty, but a clean one should be able to run fine dry for a while even if the lube were completely gone.

As far as oils, for an oil that will stay put and not evaporate, Mobil 1 10w30 (or 5w30) synthetic has worked very well for me. Just don't use it for exterior corrosion protection, because the film is thick, slippery, and persistent.

WNTFW
August 3, 2010, 12:50 AM
A quart every 3 mags -IT'S NOT AN AK!
Those are 20 round mags, not 30's. If you use 30's get out a calculator or get some training . . .

I tried CLP and RemOil, have moved on from that. I don't like the invisible stuff I can't see.

Zerodefect
August 3, 2010, 04:21 AM
CLP evaporates quickly. I use it for cleaning and oiling the barrel.

But I use a heavier oil on the BCG. Like Mobile1 15w40. Seems to last longer.

Al Thompson
August 3, 2010, 09:58 AM
Slip 2000.... :) Second the advice about Pmags.

SkinnyGrey
August 3, 2010, 11:02 AM
WNTFW, what do you mean? A quart of lube after every three mags?

LiquidTension
August 3, 2010, 11:22 AM
Wait, you're supposed to lube them? I think I did that last year sometime :uhoh:

ForumSurfer
August 3, 2010, 11:34 AM
I use Mobil 1 10w30

That's what I do. I originally did it until I could get out and buy some of the more highly recommended stuff. I had Mobil 1 laying around since I use it exclusively in my bored, stroked and blown mustang. I figured if it was good enough for that big pile of aluminum, steel and money...then surely it will be fine in my AR which is made of similar components.

Well it ran fine so I haven't bothered using anything else. I don't live in the desert, I'm not going to war...so Mobil 1 works for me.

I have since bought some CLP. I plan on using it after cleaning when I store it and keep the weapon readied for home defense. I hear it sticks better, as most (not all) of the mobil 1 ends up in the buffer tube due to vertical storage. If CLP does the same thing, well I'll continue using mobil 1 since it works, it's cheaper and I already have a ton of the stuff lying around. But if I didn't depend on the weapon for home defense or if it never saw gritty desert duty then I see no reason why mobile 1 couldn't be used if you keep it wet. Works for me, YMMV.

MoDerN_WarRioR
August 3, 2010, 06:16 PM
I clean and lube after every range session, and when I get to the range I dump some oil in again. My ARs love to run wet.

Ditto! I clean my gun every time even if I only shoot 100-200 rounds.

I Don't know if its my OCD kicking in or because im Bored and like Tearing my gun apart. But I lube mine all the way down to the extractor spring after every trip. And like I said. Some times im bored and do it just for fun :)

--Chris

CoRoMo
August 3, 2010, 06:29 PM
I stopped using oil altogether for this platform. On a whim, I tried what Mr. Yeager is demonstrating here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXIsKEHo-4g). I switched over to high temp bearing grease and have never encountered a reason to look back. YMMV

Zip06
August 3, 2010, 07:39 PM
CLP does dry/evaporate relatively quickly. For me I need to relube about every three weeks. That is here in the Pacific NW. CLP is fine for me.

stchman
August 3, 2010, 08:24 PM
Some buys use wheel bearing grease on the bolt of their AR. I am assuming DI AR only.

Walkalong
August 3, 2010, 08:55 PM
Slip 2000 (http://www.slip2000.com/products.html) lube is hard to beat on an AR. I have been playing with some Royal Purple (http://www.royalpurple.com/gun-oil.html) lube, and it is some good stuff. So far so good anyway. RP @ Pace Performance (https://02c0c2a.netsolstores.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=186446)

Zak Smith
August 3, 2010, 09:47 PM
A properly-built AR-15 will run for a very, very long time when lubed with 2 drops of CLP/FP-10 on the gas rings, 2 drops on the cam pin, and 1/2 drop per "corner" of the bolt carrier group.

Kwanger
August 3, 2010, 10:14 PM
+1 Zak.

For the OP, FWIW, I also have an M&P15, which usually gets well cleaned between 200 round shooting sessions. I generally lube bolt and carrier very lightly with CLP before reassembling; the rifle has never had a stoppage.

W.E.G.
August 4, 2010, 07:40 AM
It puts the lotion on its bolt, or it gets the hose again!

johnvid
August 4, 2010, 06:47 PM
If the gun is new stick to oil. I tried grease on a new gun and it slowed the bolt down. I cleaned the grease and applied oil, it then ran fine.
Grease may work fine on a gun that is well broken in. I now stick to oil.

Maj Dad
August 4, 2010, 07:54 PM
I picked up a quart of so of MIL-L 46000 (GI CLP) and slop it on the BCG with abandon. Runs great, never a problem, and it really makes it easier to clean than if run drier or with some of my exotic/esoteric lubes. K.I.S.S. :cool:

gun guy
August 4, 2010, 08:07 PM
one word GUNSLICK costs about a buck, you can get it at walmart, if you shoot autos, use gunslick, its a graphite suspension (kinda like a lil grease) oil heats up, throws off and burns off quick with autos, this slows the slide, leads to fire stoppages. gunslick sticks to the surfaces better, keeps the actions moving. a little dab will do ya, a tube will last many months. now,,its kinda messy, and should be cleaned off and reapplied after each range day, but you clean your weapon anyways. also for new guns it helps parts hone together instead of gaul. rem-oil with teflon on other moving parts, over time it seems the micro teflon builds up in the pores (especially in stainless weapons) and smooths things out nicely. try it, you'll like it

Shawn Dodson
August 4, 2010, 08:22 PM
Suggest your study this article: Keep Your Carbine Running (http://www.ar15.com/content/swat/keepitrunning.pdf)

Zerodefect
August 4, 2010, 09:43 PM
It puts the lotion on its bolt, or it gets the hose again!

Arfcom much?!?

wnycollector
August 4, 2010, 09:59 PM
Thanks for the article Shawn. For AR newbies like myself info like that is indispensable!

madcratebuilder
August 5, 2010, 10:14 AM
A properly-built AR-15 will run for a very, very long time when lubed with 2 drops of CLP/FP-10 on the gas rings, 2 drops on the cam pin, and 1/2 drop per "corner" of the bolt carrier group.
+1000

At the very minimum the gas rings like to be wet, save the grease for your M1A.

Sky
August 5, 2010, 11:00 AM
A friend of mine has a gun range where he rents out guns to shoot. The AR's he rents have several thousand rounds through them and he swears he does not clean anything until a malfunction....He takes the gun back after firing and uses Break Free clp (sometimes). I asked him when the last time he cleaned his AR's and he said, "He hadn't"! Yes I know shock and disbelief. Nevertheless I am using Break Free clp even though I clean my guns after going to the range. Have not noticed wearing of parts or drying out of lube. P.S. Don't shoot me I just passing it along!....P.S. talked to Larry the gunsmith/range/ccp/guru of these parts and asked him about the drying out part of break free and he said yes it does but it leaves a thin film of Teflon!!! Well I grabbed my can and sure enough it said thar be PTFE!!!!!!Ok all you desert dwellers go for it!!! wondered why my guns were not showing ware?? That's all I use but I ain't no expert only because I saw the abuse Larry's guns take and if that stuff works for him under those circumstances then it ought to be good enough for me the casual, usually clean my guns plinker/varmint terminator hero of the night hunt (in my mind anyway) blind old guy.....

benEzra
August 5, 2010, 03:08 PM
one word GUNSLICK costs about a buck, you can get it at walmart, if you shoot autos, use gunslick, its a graphite suspension (kinda like a lil grease) oil heats up, throws off and burns off quick with autos, this slows the slide, leads to fire stoppages. gunslick sticks to the surfaces better, keeps the actions moving. a little dab will do ya, a tube will last many months. now,,its kinda messy, and should be cleaned off and reapplied after each range day, but you clean your weapon anyways. also for new guns it helps parts hone together instead of gaul. rem-oil with teflon on other moving parts, over time it seems the micro teflon builds up in the pores (especially in stainless weapons) and smooths things out nicely. try it, you'll like it
Don't ever use graphite based lubricants on an AR, though. Graphite promotes corrosion on aluminum in a humid environment, which is why graphite lubes are typically banned from aircraft use. The AR's receiver is made from aircraft-grade aluminum, so graphite is a no-no there as well.

A friend of mine has a gun range where he rents out guns to shoot. The AR's he rents have several thousand rounds through them and he swears he does not clean anything until a malfunction....He takes the gun back after firing and uses Break Free clp (sometimes). I asked him when the last time he cleaned his AR's and he said, "He hadn't"! Yes I know shock and disbelief. Nevertheless I am using Break Free clp even though I clean my guns after going to the range. Have not noticed wearing of parts or drying out of lube. P.S. Don't shoot me I just passing it along!
Sky, this is actually not all that surprising. Larry Vickers has pointed out that AR's aren't particularly bothered by carbon fouling as long as they are kept well lubricated. They can run dirty and wet, but not dirty and dry.

http://vickerstactical.com/tactical-tips/weapon-lubrication/

Any good lubricant will have a similar effect to CLP in this regard.

W.E.G.
August 5, 2010, 03:25 PM
At the very minimum the gas rings like to be wet

Where to do people come up with this?

Oil on the gas rings???

Next time you go to the range, put whatever oil you think is required on the gas rings.

Fire a magazine.

Remove the bolt, and tell us how much oil is still on those gas rings.

Do you have any idea how hot those rings get?

Moreover, those rings are exposed to a tremendous amount of gas pressure.

Whatever lube is not BURNED off those rings within a few shots, will certainly be blasted off them by gas pressure.

W.E.G.
August 5, 2010, 03:42 PM
http://www.coltsmfg.com/publications.aspx

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/AR-15/m16a2carbinecommando9mmsmgm4carbine1.jpg

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/AR-15/m16a2carbinecommando9mmsmgm4carbine24.jpg

Sky
August 5, 2010, 04:02 PM
hahahaheheheh Great if I ever shoot and not clean I won't feel guilty..Good point about the gas rings I was told wipe off the carbon if present and line the ring openings 120 degrees apart. Should be good to go?

W.E.G.
August 5, 2010, 04:41 PM
Look, I am about as meticulous as any person on this planet when it comes to cleaning my guns.

I shoot AR's in competition, and I do everything within my power to make sure the gun does not go down in the middle of a match. I'm getting too old to waste a whole day of what's left of my life with a gun that fails because I failed to prevent it from failing.

When I clean my AR - that is, when I clean it like I really mean it - I take the bolt/carrier completely apart. The extractor is removed each time. I do NOT remove the ejector.

First I wipe-off everything that has crud on it.
Paper towels are great.

Next, I use a utility knife to scrape the carbon off the azz-end of the bolt. Some folks call it the "tail" of the bolt. Whatever. Any old scraping tool will do - even your granpa's pocket knife.

Next, I use a thin-tipped flat-tip screwdriver to dig the carbon out of the bolt carrier. You do NOT need one of those fancy, expensive tools from the fancy-expensive tools catalog. Just dig at it with the screwdriver from the dollar bin until you get most of the carbon out. (I'll even admit to having one of the fancy-expensive tools - and I think it sucks. The screwdriver does a way better job, and is faster.)

Next, I blast aerosol CLP through the gas key, so it fills up the carrier with foam. I use a paper towel wrapped around a chamber brush to swab the excess CLP out of the carrier.

Next, I give the bolt a similar treatment. Blast CLP into the firing pin channel until it makes a big mess, and then wipe it down with CLP. Blow compressed air (I use a canned keyboard duster) into the firing pin channel to remove excess CLP there. If you are real anal, you can even use Q-Tip swabs to clear out the channel even more. The Q-Tip trick requires a lot of finesse, so be prepared to figure out how to get a stuck Q-Tip out of the channel when that happens.

Make sure the boltface is wiped as clean as you can get it, and wipe each bolt lug to get any brass shavings or carbon off the lugs.

Wipe your cam pin, firing pin, extractor, and extractor pin with a paper towel soaked in CLP. You should have plenty of CLP-soaked paper towels already by now.

Reassemble the bolt/carrier assembly.

I won't get into details of cleaning the bore during this rant.
But, you need to also make sure the locking lugs on the barrel extension are as clean as the lugs on your bolt.

Everything is going to have a fine coat of CLP on it now.
INCLUDING THE GAS RINGS.

The gas rings will have lube on them merely as a consequence of you hosing CLP everywhere. The lube certainly won't hurt the gas rings. But, I don't believe for a second that the rings themselves require -or benefit from - lubrication. The rings get too hot, and they are under too much pressure during firing, for ANY lube to stay on them. With all due respect to the esteemed, and highly-qualified Mr. Rogers, it is truly everything EXCEPT THE GAS RINGS in the bolt/carrier assembly that requires lubrication.

If you doubt any of this, clean and lubricate your rifle as I have suggested. Then fire a magazine. Take the bolt/carrier out of the gun and inspect it. Everything will have lube on it except the gas rings, the azz-end of the bolt ("the tail") and the bottom-inside area of the carrier. The heat and gas pressure will have vaporized all the lubrication at those spots.

Some will ask, "What about the manual, that says put oil in the holes on the carrier?... Isn't that putting oil on the gas rings???"

No.
As a matter of fact it is not.

Pick up your rifle.
Look down into those holes.
Do you see anything?

You should see only darkness.

Now, retract your charging handle slowly.
You will see the gas rings pass by the holes.

OK.
So does putting oil in those holes lubricate the gas rings?

Of course it does!
And it lubricates everything else in there.
Most especially the oil travels in ALL directions, and very importantly, the oil travels in the direction of the cam pin and the locking lugs of the bolt.
When the rifle is fired, any oil that has migrated in the direction of the gas rings will be blown FORWARD - in the direction of the cam pin and bolt locking lugs.
Any oil that actually accumulates on the rings will be burned off almost instantly.

If you are still reading at this point, you may be asking, "Why does the COLT manual not say anything about putting oil on the locking lugs of the bolt?" That is a fair question indeed, and one that I have pondered. I suspect - and I am speculating here - that the reason COLT does not specifically direct the user to put oil on the bolt locking lugs, is because some percentage of the users would HOSE-DOWN the bolt lugs, and allow copious amounts of lube to enter the rifle chamber. I hope I don't need to tell anybody here that a whole bunch of oil in a rifle chamber is a really bad idea.

So, by regularly squirting oil in the holes in the bolt carrier, the oil MIGRATES to where it is most needed - which is everywhere FORWARD of the gas rings.

You will notice too, if you click the link in my prior post, and you look at the entire COLT manual, there is sparse direction about how to clean the gun. There certainly is no mention of drowning parts in CLP, or spraying parts with compressed air.

You can clean your own gun however you want. I'm sure some folks actually use Vagisil (with all due respect to Mr. Rogers' article) just for grins. There is for sure more than one way to skin a cat, or to clean an AR. What I have posted is simply how I do it. I hope it gives you something to think about, and I hope something I have said will be helpful to you.

It puts the lotion on...

W.E.G.
August 5, 2010, 04:53 PM
On the question about spacing the gaps in the gas rings, I'll answer by suggesting this:

Next time you go to the range with your AR, line up the gaps on the gas rings so they are all at the same spot, so as to MAXIMIZE blow-by of gas.

Let us know the result.

I already know the answer... but I want you to try it for yourself so you can find out.

I promise you it is safe to do this, and hopefully none of the targets will attack you or steal your lunch while you are performing this experiment.

Bartholomew Roberts
August 5, 2010, 05:01 PM
Some will ask, "What about the manual, that says put oil in the holes on the carrier?... Isn't that putting oil on the gas rings???"

No.
As a matter of fact it is not.

Then what is that little flash of silver underneath those holes in this picture of an AR15 bolt carrier (http://brigadearmory.com/catalog/images/dpms%20black%20bolt%20carrier.jpg)? Note that the bolt is extended in the unlocked position in that picture. If we assume that the bolt is in the locked position, then the gas rings will be right underneath the gas key.

So it seems like item #4 is pretty much saying "Put lube on the gas rings" - unless you are suggesting that lube inside the gas key serves some useful purpose besides channeling the lube right to the gas rings?

Another important thing to remember in your cleaning regimen is that while it doesn't take much (if any) cleaning to keep an AR running, you do need to clean any firearm that is going to be in storage for a long period of time. Even Pat Rogers mentions that one of his rifles that had been run without cleaning for months had some issues once it was taken out of the shooting rotation for a few months and just sat there.

taliv
August 5, 2010, 05:24 PM
i clean my ARs just like WEG, except I don't unassemble anything, or do any wiping and especially no scraping.

and instead of soaking paper towels in CLP, i just buy one of the slip2k squirt bottles and put a couple squirts of lube on the bolt if it looks less than wet.

W.E.G.
August 5, 2010, 07:35 PM
So it seems like item #4 is pretty much saying "Put lube on the gas rings" - unless you are suggesting that lube inside the gas key serves some useful purpose besides channeling the lube right to the gas rings?

The purpose of me blasting CLP into the gas key is only to force rust-preventative into the areas that have the most carbon. It is definitely NOT for the purpose of providing lubrication to the gas rings.

Otherwise, maybe we are just debating semantics.

But, did you read my post, where I talked about where the oil that goes in those holes on the side of the bolt carrier NEEDS to go - versus the indisputable fact that some of it surely ends up on the gas rings?

I'm adamant that the rings do NOT require lubrication.

Any lubrication that gets on the rings is BURNED OFF after just a few shots.

I feel like I'm just repeating myself at this point.
You either get, or you don't.

...or you just simply disagree

Bartholomew Roberts
August 5, 2010, 09:04 PM
Well, I understand your point and I don't necessarily disagree. I suppose I just look at it from the standpoint of "This is what I've been doing and it works" - whether it works because the lubrication goes from the gas rings to where it needs to go or because the gas rings need lube, I couldn't tell you; but typically follow the pattern Zak mentioned except I also put a drop on the ring around the bolt. Whether or not the gas rings NEED the lube, putting lube there seems to work.

I don't scrape any carbon anywhere. If it doesn't come off with some 725 degreaser and a t-shirt, then I don't worry about it (and actually I don't really use 725 but once in a blue moon, I usually just use SLIP 2000 or whatever CLP I have).

Z-Michigan
August 5, 2010, 10:14 PM
This would be easy to test. Lube the gas rings, shoot 5 shots (or whatever #), disassemble the gun and see if they are still wet with oil. Repeat with more shots or reduce the # of shots if necessary until you get an answer.

I'll probably test this next range trip, but I'm sure 10 of you will be dragging your AR's to the range before I next do so.

Oh, I don't do any carbon scraping. Since I clean every couple 100 rounds, which we've established is more often than needed, I never get a buildup. What little buildup I might see comes off easily with Hoppes Elite or Mirachem gun cleaner (both terrific carbon removers).

Zerodefect
August 5, 2010, 11:11 PM
Pretty sure my gas rings stay lubed.

Usually have a nice film of oily slick goo in my piston chamber. The black carbon in there just adds to the lube.

Never had a failure with any of my rifles. Try a thicker lube and more of it. Shoot, you could take your carrier apart drop each part in a bucket of engine oil, shake each part twice and reassemble.

It's just oil, not sand or Aids or anything.

W.E.G.
August 7, 2010, 04:50 PM
60 shots through the AR today.

Entire bolt was DROWNED in CLP before shooting.
Excess was blotted off.

At the end of the match, the bolt lugs were still damp from CLP.
Tail of the bolt, and gas rings, were dry as a bone.

Here are the rings after 60 shots.
(dry as a bone)
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/AR-15/drybolt.jpg

Here is a paper towel on which I wiped the gas ring area, and tail of the bolt, when I removed
the bolt from the carrier.
(carbon only - otherwise dry as a bone)
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/AR-15/carbon.jpg

Here is the carbon I scraped off the tail of the bolt and from the inside of the carrier.
(firing pin retaining pin for scale)
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/AR-15/carbon2.jpg

Sky
August 7, 2010, 05:51 PM
The above stated 120 degree spacing on the rings as mentioned earlier is just a nice starting point before the gun goes back together..Also if they get in a habit of checking the rings they usually will not go 10,000 rounds with no attention all carboned up....Although I honestly believe I know a few who have???? This ain't your Daddy's AR...For non-chrome lined barrels it is probably a good idea to swab or snake the barrel due to certain chemicals in certain powders(vague enough) that can lead to pitting for a gun that isn't shot that much...The guns that get five hundred rounds a day through them prolly are self cleaning the powder build up in their barrels or at least rearranging it?? Now all this is just hear say and speculation but kinda makes you go "Hummmmm".

Barbara
August 7, 2010, 07:31 PM
I typically shoot 1k or so (non-corrosive ammo) before cleaning. I lube it before shooting and rarely have issues with function.

christcorp
December 30, 2010, 05:08 PM
My lubing process is pretty simple.

1. CLP on anything that mechanically moves.
2. While in the safe: Light film of Walmart Super-Tech Moly-Lithium Grease. Only on mechanical externals like bolt carrier, charging handle, and hammer/trigger (Internals like bolt and firing pin just the CLP). Tube of Moly-Lithium grease is a couple dollars, and will last your entire lifetime; your child's lifetime; and probably your grand child's lifetime.
3. Just prior to shooting: Spray more CLP on ALL moving parts. Basically; just spray the crap out of the rifle and wipe off the excess.

After shooting:
1. Bore Snake the barrel
2. Powder blast or similar the trigger/hammer area and chamber area of the barrel. (Brush if necessary)
3. Field Strip Bolt carrier assembly.
4. Powder Blast or similar all parts disassembled.
5. CLP spray lube ALL mechanical parts (Step 1 in first section above)
6. Reassemble gun.
7. Super-Tech Moly-Lithium grease external mechanical parts (Step 2 in first section above).
8. Put gun away in safe.

Prior to shooting; go to Step 3 in first section above, and repeat the process.

The reason I use the Moly-Lithium grease is because it WON'T run out. It allows you to have a long term lubricant on the gun when stored or when just tinkering with it at home. It's very inexpensive. There's a lot of it in a tube. And it's removed easily with powder blast or similar.

Total cleaning and lubing time for me is less than 10 minutes. That's after an average shooting of about 500 rounds.

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