Primer pocket uniforming?


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SourMash
August 5, 2010, 06:41 PM
What tool do you guys recommend to use? I have been looking at this..http://www.sinclairintl.com/.aspx/sid=63187/pid=34720/sku/Sinclair_Primer_Pocket_Uniformers__Small_Rifle_Pistol

Is it any good?

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375shooter
August 5, 2010, 07:49 PM
I have no personal experience with it, but by the looks of it, it should work fine. It looks very much like the one I used to use. I stopped using it because I couldn't notice any accuracy advantage, in my hunting rifles.

Nomad
August 5, 2010, 08:03 PM
Anything Sinclair sells is top shelf. I have used their products since the early 80's. You'll never have a problem and if you do they will stand behind it. I have a proto type from them but my guess is the cutter is the same, only the hangle has changed. You don't say what you plan to use it on but I wouldn't bother to use it on anything but rifle brass.

MEHavey
August 5, 2010, 08:05 PM
Looks fine...
Toss the handle though, and just chuck it in a cordless drill to use.

Otto
August 5, 2010, 08:12 PM
I use the Sinclair uniformers and they work great.
The link you posted depicts a handle with the uniformer but it's actually sold separately.
I simply chuck mine in my cordless drill, so no handle or adapter is needed.

Walkalong
August 5, 2010, 08:38 PM
Only gun I have ever used a PP uniformer for is my Bench gun. It is from Whitetail Engineering. Won't hurt a thing to re-cut them, but it isn't going to make any difference in group size in stock guns. Might not do anything in a Bench gun either, but it made us all warm and fuzzy about uniform primer seating.

SourMash
August 5, 2010, 09:52 PM
Once again, Thanks alot!!!!!

jhansman
August 5, 2010, 09:57 PM
Looks good. What I like about that tool is the hex head design. Mine screw into the handle, so I can only turn them one way when cleaning the pocket; if I turn the other way, it unscrews and has no effect. The hex socket design lets you rotate either direction. May have to spring for one of these myself.

Otto
August 5, 2010, 10:26 PM
Accuracy improvement has nothing to do with why I uniform primer pockets.
When I bought my LNL progressive it would fail to seat primers deep enough on a reliable basis. I tried different remedies, different techniques without success and ended up sending the press back to Hornady twice but they couldn't fix it either.
I concluded that the LNL didn't have enough mechanical advantage to crush-fit a primer in a shallow pocket. Once I uniformed all the pockets to the correct depth I never had a high primer again.
Another benefit of a uniformer is that is does an excellent job of cleaning the pockets which may appeal to some reloaders.

GW Staar
August 5, 2010, 10:54 PM
Only gun I have ever used a PP uniformer for is my Bench gun. It is from Whitetail Engineering. Won't hurt a thing to re-cut them, but it isn't going to make any difference in group size in stock guns. Might not do anything in a Bench gun either, but it made us all warm and fuzzy about uniform primer seating.

That's about it all right...except if you have an RCBS Pro 2000 and you want to use the built-in primer system. Below the shell plate on that machine is a stop bolt, that allows me to punch the primers in to the stop without worrying about crunching primers or not seating them enough.

The caveat there is the primer cavity depth varies. Walkalong handles that just fine by bypassing his press's priming function and hand priming. Me too sometimes...and I could remove the stop and do it by feel (not so sensitive with a big press arm). But, by uniforming the primer cavities, I have a set depth I can set the stop bolt to. For commercial bottleneck brass it works great. .005 to .007 every time is good enough, I think.

I don't compete...or worry much about sub MOA, but I don't like high primers either.

To the O.P. the Sinclair is surely good...everything else they sell is. Some is even over engineered IMO. Other brands work too. I use the RCBS one in their Trim Mate power tool. BTW I like the Trim Mate for it's handiness and small footprint...drills work fine too, but aren't as easy to keep the cutter perpendicular with the case. I agree with others that the Trim Mate is a little slow...waiting for a electronics engineer here to show us how to speed it up. :)

SourMash
August 5, 2010, 11:01 PM
"Another benefit of a uniformer is that is does an excellent job of cleaning the pockets which may appeal to some reloaders".

This is what I was thinking about using it for....

mmorris
August 5, 2010, 11:16 PM
I have the Sinclair small and large pistol uniformers. They are very good tools.

I chuck mine directly in a cordless drill... you don't need any adapters. I can not imagine doing this by hand.

Walkalong
August 6, 2010, 08:29 AM
That's about it all right...except if you have an RCBS Pro 2000 and you want to use the built-in primer system. Below the shell plate on that machine is a stop bolt, that allows me to punch the primers in to the stop without worrying about crunching primers or not seating them enough.
Excellent point. A very good reason to uniform primer pockets.

Berry's MFG
August 6, 2010, 12:32 PM
I prefer the Sinclair uniformer, I feel deburring the flash hole is more important. When the flash hole is made it is punched in with the pocket. That material ends up on one side of the flash hole on the inside. When you deburr the hole it removes the punch and puts a nice angled flash entry into the case. I only do it with my hunting and long range rifles and uniform the pocket as well. I also turn the outside of the necks. I agree with the earlier post that it makes me feel warm and fuzzy probably more than what it does for my accuracy, if I were a bench rest shooter i am sure I would take it very seriously.

GW Staar
August 6, 2010, 01:04 PM
I prefer the Sinclair uniformer, I feel deburring the flash hole is more important. When the flash hole is made it is punched in with the pocket. That material ends up on one side of the flash hole on the inside. When you deburr the hole it removes the punch and puts a nice angled flash entry into the case. I only do it with my hunting and long range rifles and uniform the pocket as well. I also turn the outside of the necks. I agree with the earlier post that it makes me feel warm and fuzzy probably more that what it does for my accuracy, if I were a bench rest shooter i am sure I would take it very seriously.

The only very minor thing I have against the Sinclair is the shaft diameter....which means I can't use it on my Trim Mate.:( The fact that the Sinclair is not adjustable for depth is both an advantage and a disadvantage. As long as quality control is there and they don't send out samples that cut too deep, then it's an advantage. My RCBS one was a little too deep, and I was able to loosen the set screw, rotate the cutter a little and tighten the set screw at the proper depth. Yes it was a little aggravating, but not as bad as having to send it back and wait for a new one. There remained the remote possibility of slippage, but that would become obvious the first time you find a deep primer. Once I had mine perfect, I degreased the tool, then filled the cavity under and around the cutter with super glue...it won't move now.

One thing I don't think was mentioned in the thread is this: Both pocket uniforming, and flash hole deburring are operations that only have to be done once on a case. The slight inconveniance is not that big of a deal when you consider that you can reuse a case numerous times and you only have to "fix" the pockets the first time.

As for "warm and fuzzy"....I think that's because of Murphy's Law. When you do everything in your power to make sure nothing goes wrong, then you have a right to feel warm and fuzzy.:)

Berry's MFG
August 6, 2010, 01:09 PM
The tools I have from Sinclair are about 15 years old and they are adjustable on depth. If the new ones are not adjustable that is too bad.

GW Staar
August 6, 2010, 01:17 PM
Quoting from their site: "The Sinclair 8000 Series Uniformers are precision ground from one solid piece of tungsten carbide, so there is no need to worry about changing the depth of cut."

Again that's a good thing if they're right on...and they probably are.;)

Walkalong
August 6, 2010, 03:53 PM
I feel deburring the flash hole is more important.I use a K&M tool for that, and yes, no use uniforming primer pockets on brass with poor flash holes with tabs of brass hanging off on the inside unless you are going to fix that as well.

My Whitetail Design carbide primer pocket uniformer is non adjustable. I see no reason for an adjustable one.

Jesse Heywood
August 6, 2010, 08:08 PM
I made the mistake of buying the Possum Hollow uniformer. It's a pain to adjust and will not hold the adjustment if the pocket diameter is small. and the hex holder is too big to use in a 1/2" drill chuck.

BigBob3006
September 3, 2010, 04:20 AM
I've tried two cutters made of tool steel and both got dull pretty quick. Then I found a tool made of carbide and have used it for several years and they're still sharp. I'm not sure but I think they're by Lyman. Cost extra, but worth every penny.:)

ScottyPotty
September 3, 2010, 09:00 AM
I uniform my PP on my AR's so that they are all seated correctly. With the floating firring on AR's pin you can get slam fires if the primers are not seated correctly.

I use the RCBS uniformer on the trim mate.

bonza
September 4, 2010, 07:13 PM
I have a couple sizes of the K&M primer pocket uniformers, as well as their flashhole uniformer. Have had them for years & they're still going strong. My main reason behind using the uniformer these days, is that it makes cleaning the primer pocket that much easier.

Rokman
September 5, 2010, 02:22 PM
I can vouch for other Sinclair's products. They are very good. I have an RCBS pocket uniformer on their trim mate, but find little use for it.

flashhole
September 6, 2010, 12:33 AM
I use the EJS tool. It is double ended, small uniformer on one end, large on the other and both are adjustable for depth. I got in the habit of using my uniformer as a primer pocket cleaning tool. It's done many thousands of cases and is as sharp today as the day I bought it. I also use the EJS flash hole uniformer. Both are excellent tools.

noylj
September 6, 2010, 02:36 AM
Unless you need to remove a military crimp or you are an advanced benchrest/varmint hunter, it will not do anything for you. There are so many things that affect accuracy before you EVER get to the primer pocket or the flash hole. Those are for the person who shoots inside 0.25" at 100 yards and needs to shave another 0.001 off the group size.

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