Start-stop, Start-stop


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crooked stripe
August 7, 2010, 09:03 PM
I have a friend who is helping me to get started reloading. Seems like every time I get ready to reload some shells by myself I run into some abbreviation that I don't understand. For example, in the reloading book I read BC, SD in the upper right hand corner of the bullet size chart. I looked up these abbreviations and the definitions are way over my head. Also numbers- OAL I assume is the over all length. How critical is this and what are the tolerances? +or- what? I can't seem to find these type of definitions in the Lee's or Lyman hand books.
Is this rocket science?
My friend seems to think I will have no problem reloading but the out come of a screw up could be tragic. Is there a reloading book for dummies?
Someone please point me in the right direction. John

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JimKirk
August 7, 2010, 09:11 PM
Most reloading manual have a glossary of reloading terms in the back.

You do have at least one good manual right? Are you sure they are not in those books you list?

My Hornady, Speer, Nosler and Sierra manuals have a glossary.

Jimmy K

dagger dog
August 7, 2010, 09:13 PM
Stick with your manual, all the unlearned abbrevitations will eventually be dechiphered as you gain the experiance. The "manual" will keep you safe, as long as you abide by its rules.

As far as I know there is no one manual that will answer all your questions. But you have already gained one the best resources by finding your way to the High Road.

crooked stripe
August 7, 2010, 09:57 PM
Neither Lees or Lyman's has a glossary as I learned what a glossary is. About 6-8 pages at the end of both books of charts, bullet abbreviations, etc. Lees does have 4 pages of some explanations that are very helpful. I will check out some other books. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I was standing next to a 454 big block that blew years ago and I guess I just cant get that out of my head. Crap flew every where.

Walkalong
August 7, 2010, 10:03 PM
Ballistic Coefficient and Sectional Density

Fairly easy to understand if you read the definitions. O.A.L., yes, overall length. Some use C.O.A.L. Cartridge overall length. It will vary .005 to as much as .010 depending on the caliber and bullet style. Less with some. Fit of the seater stem makes a difference among other things.

Mule
August 7, 2010, 11:00 PM
Reloading for Dummies.

If your bullet has a crimping groove-cannelure- Use It.
Your bullet seating depth will be within tolerance.
If the cartridge is short enough to fit in your magazine, you are golden! A bullet too deep in the case is more dangerous than a bullet seated not deep enough.

A dial caliper is an excellant tool to have.

Begin with "Starting" loads. Build confidence and strive for accuracy before you succome to your need for speed.

JimKirk
August 8, 2010, 08:12 AM
http://www.reloadbench.com/gloss/terms.html

http://www.saami.org/glossary/display.cfm?letter=A

here is an online Glossary... maybe it'll help until you find a manual with one.

Jimmy K

crooked stripe
August 8, 2010, 09:00 AM
Thanks Jimmy, great info. Book store doesn't open around here till tomorrow. I have seen them there but bought what I was told was best.

Remo-99
August 8, 2010, 09:36 AM
SD & BC are not so important to new reloaders as other basics are like doing proper load workups without exceeding the book max, case prep, max length...etc.

BC may come in handy later when trying to work out what a bullet drop is at xyz yards and at xyz velocity.

Ed Gallop
August 8, 2010, 09:57 AM
If I were you I wouldn't worry too much about ballistics while starting out. If you like reloading, and a bit anal I am, then you will likely get involved with more technical information as time goes on. Follow the press and die manuals and a decent reloading manual that shows proper loads and you are on your way. Reading this forum, and searching out problems you might have, is a wonderful resource. You just need to relax and not try to understand it all or you might get overloaded and quit. It is quite simple if you take it slowly. At least that is my opinion. The learning process never ends if you follow this forum.

ranger335v
August 8, 2010, 10:00 AM
"OAL I assume is the over all length. How critical is this and what are the tolerances? +or- what? I can't seem to find these type of definitions in the Lee's or Lyman hand books. Is this rocket science?"

It is not rocket science and if the things you mention were critical the books would spend more time on those trivial details. That said, I'd suggest you spend some time reading before you start-stop the actual loading again, read it all until you better understand what it says.

All any manual can do us give us a starting place, including OAL and powder charges. Manuals are a guide, not a Bible. Your needs may be different, almost certainly will be different, because you aren't loading for their rifle so you best do as they say but watch your own results as you work.

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