Feral dog hunting... memories from my youth


PDA






Jbabbler
August 9, 2010, 10:06 AM
A lot of my friends are in to deer hunting and get all hyped up in the fall when the season starts. I've never gotten in to that but have hunted when the need arises my entire life. I ran in to a good friend a few weeks ago and we started talking about our "hunting days" back in the early '90s when we were teenagers.

When we were in high school my best friend lived on a 350 acre piece of land in Barnesville, GA. They had the standard farm fare....horses, cows, chickens etc... At least twice per year his dad would call us to come down and clear the dogs off the land. Packs of wild dogs (most released by their owners in the middle of no where) would roam the land in groups of 20-30. They attacked chickens, ducks and any other farm animal they could corner. They also kept the deer from coming around. One year he let the pastor of his church hunt deer on the land and the pastor was attacked by a pack. After that he would call us in the late spring and late fall to come take cae of them. We would hunt them with our various rifles. I always carried my SKS and my older brother had a 13rd tube fed 22 that he could empty quicker than I could my SKS. My buddy carried an Ariska on the first trip but changed to a Remington 1100 after wards.

One year his dad called and told us that a pack of dogs had killed an old horse that they had been boarding. He asked if we were up to a little hunting. We just thought they were stupid dogs that would be easy to take care of. The first hunt was a real eye opener. We spent the night on the farm on Saturday night and you could hear the dogs barking in the distance throughout the night. The next morning we headed out at sunup. We were walking a trail that they had used the night they took the horse and about 1/2 a mile into the woods you could smell them. Then, about 100' in front of us there was a mid-sized, harmless looking dog sleeping in the middle of the trail. My buddy was going to take him out and I told him that he was crazy and to leave it alone. I tried the cutsey-voice "come here little poochey" thing and he started barking an alarm; That's when we realized he wasn't a lone, lost puppy. All around us we started hearing movement and a couple of dozen other dogs all came out of the trees. Several immediately circled around us in what appeared to be a well thought out flanking maneuver while others ran about 100' up the trail, turned and started barking. I would say that at least half of them decided to come after us. I'm sure we looked hilarious... 3 teenaged boys running as fast as we could through the woods screaming like girls completely oblivious to the fact that we had guns. We ran toward a berm and dove over it in our best Iwo Jima impressions. My older brother (19 yrs old) came up first, turned and started popping 22 stingers into the pack. I was surprised but they dropped one by one when those little buggers hit. I turned and popped 3 or so with my first stripper clip and my buddy got off at least one shot with his Ariska. Out of the dozen or so that were charging us only 3 ran off. From that point on we took it a lot more serious. We ended up finding a lot more of them later that day and again the next morning. In all, we took out about 25 of them on the first trip.

One interesting thing was that every feral dog we shot would be 100% gone the next morning without a trace. I'm guessing the rest of the pack ate well that night. We probably did this twice a year for 4 years and would bag 40 or so each year.

Anyway, sorry if you just wasted 5 minutes of your life listening to one of my old memories. Lets hear some of yours.

If you enjoyed reading about "Feral dog hunting... memories from my youth" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
happycamper374
August 9, 2010, 10:08 PM
I really enjoyed that story. Thanks for posting it! Sounded like fun.

I imagine there's a taboo about shooting dogs, but there doesn't seem to be any taboo about shooting coyotes or wolves. They all do the same thing once they're out in the wild, so I don't see an issue with it.

yongxingfreesty
August 9, 2010, 10:48 PM
i agree this is a lot more fun then shooting deer. it just seems too easy as they come up to the feeders and you just pull the trigger sittinginyour deer stand.

Justin Holder
August 9, 2010, 11:39 PM
I was siting in my deer stand watching a deer gut pile hoping to ad another coyote to the bag when three stray mutts appeared in the road in front of me headed strait to the gut pile. One was a very large black dog along with two smaller brown ones.

I took the big dog first with a 95 grain Nosler BST from my 243 behind the shoulder. As he went down the others turned and ran back down the road right toward me.
The second one flipped over backwards with a running shot to the throat. The third dog took a bullet it in the chest running at about 75 yards.

All three shots were taken within 15 seconds. Now that's what I call some fast and furious shooting.

Sky
August 10, 2010, 12:21 AM
Same kinda story different animal; when i was about 13 years old a buddy and I used to go to Bear creek ( about 6 miles south of Grapevine, TX) to shoot Cotton mouth and Short tail water moccasins. We would walk down the middle of the creek waist deep Jungle Jim style with our trusty semi-auto .22s safe in the knowledge that if a Cotton mouth opened his mouth under water he would drown!! 16 year old Billy had told us so it had to be right! If a snake came at us we figured it would come on top the water (that would be the proper snake way)..There were a few that slithered into the water in our general direction without surfacing so we would place a few rounds in front of us to scare them away. One summer we killed over 240 snakes in about a two week period...The whole creek stunk so bad from dead snakes you could smell it for a considerable distance. Seems like about that time there was a water skier at Grapevine Lake who skied back into a cove and fell. The skier was snake bitten over 20 times and did not live. My father read the story to me as knowledge/entertainment after supper. I just could not believe my ears. I mentioned I had not believed a Cotton Mouth or a Short Tail Moccasin could or would bite under the water and needless to say he set me straight rather quickly. That was the last year we walked down the middle of Bear Creek Jungle Jim style. Hey we were young; great shots but had watched to many Johnny Weissmuller movies.....Funny I always had (usually a Coach Whip) pet snake that I kept around during the summer. Would catch one and keep him until I found a bigger one. Had some pretty big snakes by summers end. Did some big Rattle Snake hunts around Jacksboro, TX but thought that was boring until I saw a guy come running off the side of a hill with the Daddy of all Rattlers slithering with intent of doing some serious biting chasing him. Most snakes will avoid people but those Jack County Rattlers if mad will give you a serious chase. The guy had used a single shot 16 gauge he had shot at the snake and mostly missed...yea go figure?

Greg Koziol
August 10, 2010, 06:17 AM
When you walked up on that dog it was probably sleeping and gaurding the fresh killed horse. Dogs, foxes, and wolves are night hunters, low light gives them an advantage because it eliminates one of the main detectors of their prey which is eye-sight, deer dont' see well at night only hear and smell, just like us, though i think our eye sight is better then a deers during any time of the day. They probably killed it during the night and they were all sleeping around it gorging themselves feeding on it and gaurding it. When you walked up on the horse they probably thought you were trying to steel their kill from them thats why they were barking, they thought you were a challenge and were gonna take that horse or whatever from them. Feral dogs are no joke, they are worse then wolves because they lack the size to kill bigger game so they go after pets and people. They work in huge packs because they are too small to do damage to any large animal or person in a pack smaller than 5.

Feral dogs are a big problem, they are straight from hell.

I would not attempt to exterminate a big pack of feral dogs like you mention in your story without atleast the following:

1.a full chain male shark suit, i'd wrap double layers around by wrists and neck. i'd wear a welders mask and cut a breather hole so they can't tear at my face
2. A semi auto rifle like SKS or AK, heavy caliber is best, a .45 acp pistol
3. NAginata sword, or some type of spear or long sword,
4. 2 machetes
5. a good karambit knife
6. Louisville slugger

Greg Koziol
August 10, 2010, 06:19 AM
A 12 gauge with buckshot would be ideal, just point and blow away each dog that charges you, no need to aim, and you won't miss. I'd def wear a chain mail shark suit

KSCCHTrainer
August 10, 2010, 08:19 AM
I don't care where you live, feral dogs are becoming a problem. Unfortunately, where I live, the animal rights people get their shorts in a wedgie over anyone killing them.

It's pretty much criminal for individuals not with Animal Control to eliminate them and Animal Control's budget doesn't cover eliminating dangerous feral dogs. Then there's the other problem - irresponsible owners letting their pets roam free without proper immunization and no collars. It's the classic case of "You're damned if you do and damned if you don't.

Jbabbler
August 10, 2010, 01:43 PM
I really enjoyed that story. Thanks for posting it! Sounded like fun.

I imagine there's a taboo about shooting dogs, but there doesn't seem to be any taboo about shooting coyotes or wolves. They all do the same thing once they're out in the wild, so I don't see an issue with it.

Thanks HC,
Unfortunately, those that would protest such dealings are completely ignorant of the potential danger of these packs.

Jbabbler
August 10, 2010, 01:46 PM
When you walked up on that dog it was probably sleeping and gaurding the fresh killed horse. Dogs, foxes, and wolves are night hunters, low light gives them an advantage because it eliminates one of the main detectors of their prey which is eye-sight, deer dont' see well at night only hear and smell, just like us, though i think our eye sight is better then a deers during any time of the day. They probably killed it during the night and they were all sleeping around it gorging themselves feeding on it and gaurding it. When you walked up on the horse they probably thought you were trying to steel their kill from them thats why they were barking, they thought you were a challenge and were gonna take that horse or whatever from them. Feral dogs are no joke, they are worse then wolves because they lack the size to kill bigger game so they go after pets and people. They work in huge packs because they are too small to do damage to any large animal or person in a pack smaller than 5.

Feral dogs are a big problem, they are straight from hell.


You are probably right. The closer we got to their location the stronger the odor of death. The first pack we took out had killed dozens of farm animals in the area already. This particular pack had been driven off of an adjacent property where they had taken several goats.

Jbabbler
August 10, 2010, 01:47 PM
I don't care where you live, feral dogs are becoming a problem. Unfortunately, where I live, the animal rights people get their shorts in a wedgie over anyone killing them.

It's pretty much criminal for individuals not with Animal Control to eliminate them and Animal Control's budget doesn't cover eliminating dangerous feral dogs. Then there's the other problem - irresponsible owners letting their pets roam free without proper immunization and no collars. It's the classic case of "You're damned if you do and damned if you don't.

We need more government in our lives.

Kawabuggy
August 10, 2010, 04:28 PM
My son & I recently walked up on a pack of feral dogs in a dry creek bed. It was about 13' straight up either side to get out of the creek bed, and we did not have time to get up out of there. They saw us, right as we saw them, and they started barking and charging straight towards us.. I handed my son my 1911 in .45, with hammer cocked, and told him to hold his fire until I told him to shoot. I released the safety from my 22-250, and held it on the lead dog-which I assumed would be the Alpha dog.. There were only 6 of them, but they came running in mass towards us with teeth beared.. I told my son to get ready to shoot. Right as they got close to us, I yelled at them and stepped forward which stopped the lead dog. Once he stopped the rest of them stopped and just stood there barking at me. They were only 10 feet from us. I held my fire, and eventually they retreated. I was VERY concerned about my son had they attacked, and was happy that they stopped and re-treated. I was hoping that had we started shooting that the noise would have scared them away as well. Thankfully, it did not have to come to that. I can only imagine what would have happened had there been more of them, and had they been more hungry.

Tenn870
August 10, 2010, 09:15 PM
are these feral dogs just one breed or do they look different, i cant imagine a poodle running in a pack alongside a german shepard haha, first i ever heard of feral dogs, a few years back we saw some along a highway looked like they were scavenging

keep the stories coming they are all great

CoastieShep
August 10, 2010, 10:36 PM
Feral dogs will be mutts. Been removed from somebody's lap by a couple generations.
Reminds me when I was a kid. Shootin ground squirrels with my dad and our .22's. Friend of his had a herd of cattle and would have us out there a couple times a year to thin out the squirrels. We'd just hike around and shoot every one we saw. Impressed my dad when he saw me start killing them with one shot out to 100 yds. Still have that rifle today. It's the only gun I'd never get rid of. I'll give it to my kids in my will.

Jbabbler
August 10, 2010, 10:45 PM
Very much a mixed bag. Small/medium/large/Xlarge.
One time we came across a trail that we tracked for a few miles. Along the way we saw clearings that smelled like musky dog urine. When we caught up with them they were chasing cattle in a field. We took out the small group corraling the cows and started headin back. We heard some noise down by the lake and went to check on it. There were new pups, maybe 8 weeks old) playing by the lake. We picked them up and took all 3 back to the house. We took them all to the vet and one tested positive for some disease and was put down. The other two became pets for my friend and his dad. One lived to be 12yrs old, the other one got hit by a car about 5 yrs after we found it. They were both roamers though and would get out of any enclosure you put them in. They never left the farm but the wouldn't stay inside either.

Art Eatman
August 10, 2010, 11:04 PM
A friend of mine lost some sheep to feral dogs. His small ranch was within a couple of miles of the edge of town. A few days later, luckily on a Saturday when he was home from his town job, the dogs came back. He shot two or three. One was very nice collie type, complete with collar and the owner's name and phone number.

He phoned the owner. "Oh, I'll be right out, as soon as I can!" "No hurry; he's not gong anywhere."

Even after seeing the dead sheep, the owner just could not believe that Precious Pet would do such a thing.

Yeah, right...

AndyJ
August 10, 2010, 11:33 PM
Back in the Late 70's, I worked on a large Dairy Farm in East TN. We had a problem with feral dogs attacking the dairy heifers which were worth quite a bit of money. The ones they did not kill were maimed with ears or tails missing.

I dispatched the pack over time with a .243. One interesting note. Evidently the 'pack' influence is strong. I would see varying numbers of "pets" running with the core pack which numbered 12-15 obviously feral dogs. Sometimes I would see the same pet consecutive days and sometimes I would only see it or them intermittently.

The viciousness and extremely aggressive nature of the feral dogs stays with me to this day. They are not to be lightly dismissed as a threat to a human.

Jbabbler
August 11, 2010, 10:40 AM
Art and Andy,
Just goes to show that the pack mentality is ingrained in all canines. There were a few dogs with collars on when we were in the woods. They behaved exactly like those that were 2-3 generations out from being pets.

awtCZ
August 11, 2010, 11:18 AM
Ten years or so ago there was a pack of feral dogs that did some serious damage in the residential area I live in.
They killed countless pet bunnies by literally tearing the cages open, killed pet goats, potbellied pigs, killed a handful of sheep at one guys place and even hamstrung and killed his big Ram with a full set of horns.

They finally were killed and broken up one night when they got into a goat pen and the owners son heard them ran out there with his .410.
The lead dog (a beautiful German Shepard) charged right at him :eek: for a little helping of .410 slug to the chest.

jlasserton
August 11, 2010, 11:25 AM
Wow! I really enjoyed reading your story. I have never shot at a feral dog, but do love to deer hunt. It just goes to show you how feral dogs were overpopulated back then (and may still be) just like deer are today.

wulfhart
August 11, 2010, 01:18 PM
Our neighbor had 3-4 dogs that would roam at night. The bad thing was they didn't bark or yip like coyotes. They just came silent, killed and left. They gutted our turkey/chicken house one night. They didn't even eat, just ripped their heads off. My father took the dead turkeys went over to the owner's house and after a few nice words left a pile of bloody turkeys on their porch. My dad was a nice man, if I had dogs do half what they did to us (also bit my brother a nice one, chased us on our bikes), I would have staked out the remaining chickens and shot them the moment I had a good bead on them.

Yeah even pets can turn into killers if left to their own, they don't need an already feral pack to do it either.

Anyone in NM need help with feral dogs? I would love to assist.

KZinOKC
August 11, 2010, 01:53 PM
Kawabuggy, I don't know how you held back from this situation, I know I wouldn't. Glad you're ok.

Kingcreek
August 11, 2010, 02:41 PM
A few years ago we had a problem with 3 feral canines. I can't imagine what a pack that size would be like. I was attacked while changing a flat tire on a trailer on the farm and used a wooden pallet and a tire iron gladiator-style to drive them off. the next and last time it happened I was cutting brush and carrying a glock 23.

rygould
August 11, 2010, 03:08 PM
Luckily never had a problem with feral dogs. I have heard a lot of horror stories. It is incredible how quickly the pack and predator mentality can come out in even the most gentle dog if the circumstances are right.

Back when I was a kid we lived on 5 acres an hour or so outside of Boston and there was nothing but farm houses, forests and fields around. We had to Siberian Huskies that managed to escape one night and by the time we found them miles away the next afternoon they had a trail of dead animals behind them. One father found the female tearing into his daughter's pet bunny cage and shot her right in the hind quarter.

It was just amazing that the sweet little family dogs who weren't starving or malnourished could turn into a predators so quickly. Our family never held any hard feelings towards the guy that shot her. She ended up being just fine, and I would have done the exact same thing if I were him. You can't trust any stray dog that wanders onto your property.

Jbabbler
August 11, 2010, 10:52 PM
Great stories guys. Keep them coming.

Leanwolf
August 11, 2010, 11:13 PM
GREG KOZIOL - "A 12 gauge with buckshot would be ideal, just point and blow away each dog that charges you, no need to aim, and you won't miss.

You can't possibly be serious ........ can you?? :rolleyes:

L.W.

Art Eatman
August 12, 2010, 12:41 PM
That tired old shotgun myth never dies...

wulfhart
August 12, 2010, 12:41 PM
GREG KOZIOL - "A 12 gauge with buckshot would be ideal, just point and blow away each dog that charges you, no need to aim, and you won't miss.
You can't possibly be serious ........ can you??

L.W.
It's like giant fuzzy clay pigeons that bite you. :p

Aiming??? Come one, everybody knows shotguns can't miss and dogs are level 1's with only have 5 hitpoints with no shields.:rolleyes:


Seriously, I would want a shotgun in this instance too. I am simply better with a shotgun at the OP's range. However, I have a feeling that dogs getting that close while hunting doesn't happen too often.

KodiakBeer
August 12, 2010, 12:57 PM
I grew up in farm country thirty miles out of Detroit (now suburbs...) and we used to shoot a lot of feral cats. They were everywhere and I'm sure they hugely impacted the pheasants and rabbits we were usually hunting. The thing I remember most was how hard they were to kill. A load of #6 wouldn't ever just kill them, you'd have to walk up and shoot them again from close range.
We'd occasionally see lone feral dogs (never saw packs), but I could never bring myself to shoot them. A starving mutt once followed us back to our car, and my friend took it home and it became his dog.

Jbabbler
August 14, 2010, 02:50 PM
That same pathetic starving dog that became your pet turns in to an efficient hunter when joined by a few more friends. There's a big difference between the behavior of a scared mongrel and a pack of hunters.

qwert65
August 14, 2010, 03:06 PM
That same pathetic starving dog that became your pet turns in to an efficient hunter when joined by a few more friends. There's a big difference between the behavior of a scared mongrel and a pack of hunters.

True, but thats no reason not to adopt one if one so chooses

Jbabbler
August 14, 2010, 03:10 PM
True, but thats no reason not to adopt one if one so chooses
I think you missed my point. I wasn't saying that he shouldn't have adopted it. We adopted 2 of the little buggers ourselves. I'm saying that a house pet that somehow ends up alone, hungry and away from home will act completely different than he will if he joins up with a hunter pack.

Water-Man
August 14, 2010, 04:01 PM
Seems to me I remember an elderly couple who were killed and partially eaten by a pack of feral dogs awhile ago.

qwert65
August 14, 2010, 04:51 PM
I think you missed my point. I wasn't saying that he shouldn't have adopted it. We adopted 2 of the little buggers ourselves. I'm saying that a house pet that somehow ends up alone, hungry and away from home will act completely different than he will if he joins up with a hunter pack.
You are correct I misunderstood your post.

I would add and this is a general comment not directed at you or anyone specific here that we should have sympathy for these dogs afterall they are only trying to survive-NOTE I've shot feral dogs as well, though I believe in doing it as humanely as possible and if I can get them to an animal shelter I do so

Quoheleth
August 14, 2010, 04:59 PM
We had a pack take down our small herd of 4 (or was it 5?) 200lb calves when I was in grade school. Drug 'em down, hamstrung them and killed two outright. The others were mauled but left barely alive. I found them - Wednesday mornings, Dad would go to a men's Bible study at church, so I did chores - and had to put them down.

We called the local sherriff's deputy whom Dad knew and he told us that if the dogs were on our premesis we could "exercise extreme prejudice" against the dogs. The next three weekends my best friend and I hunted our adjoining pastures, he with a Ruger .308 and me with a Savage .270. We bagged a couple at varying ranges, all over 100 yards. My best shot was 200 long jogging strides. His was just short of that.

We saw a few more after than, and from the morning I had to put down the calves until I left for college, I never went out in the morning or evening without at least a .22 rifle or pistol.

Q

cisco11
August 14, 2010, 05:21 PM
Have shot a number of wild dogs in the past. Haven't seen any in a while. After a generation or two, or a old surviving wild dog, they look different . Both in appearance and mannerism. Their heads get bigger, their tails are short and scrubby. Their bodies look different. Their mannerism always looks like they are unemployed. It generally takes more than 3 inna pack to go after a person.I have run into a small pack twice, maybe 3 -5 dogs.I got 2 with a.22 both times. Over time eliminated some or all of the rest with .22 Rem Jet. Good dog surpriser.
I hunt in northern Wisconsin, we used to see more dogs , haven't seen any in a few years. We shoot every dog and cat hunting on their own .
Even seen a few dogs commit suicide.
Cisco

MattTheHat
August 24, 2010, 04:04 PM
I seem to recall reading that with random breeding, even pure bred dogs would return completely to the classic "wild dog" in both appearance and temperament, within five to seven generations. Don't know if it's truer or not, but it would sure explain the aggressiveness mentioned in this thread.

-Matt

Jbabbler
August 24, 2010, 06:45 PM
That is definitely true of pigs/hogs. A few generations in the wild and they grow long, course hair. I guess dogs could be the same way.

FLAvalanche
August 24, 2010, 07:31 PM
Seems to me I remember an elderly couple who were killed and partially eaten by a pack of feral dogs awhile ago.

See!?!? How can you shoot these wonderful wild doggies? They're obviously helping our gene pool by preying on the sick, lame and lazy.

fireside44
August 24, 2010, 09:48 PM
Surprised to see this thread. I preached shooting feral dogs for some years and mostly received harsh condemnation from others, including most hunters I knew at the time, which really makes no sense. Seems now that the problem has increased over the years there are more people who see the good sense in it.

Same for cats with no collar.

Jbabbler
December 6, 2010, 11:51 AM
I was invited to go down and clear some land again this coming weekend. Apparently there is a very large pack or multiple packs taking down livestock at a neighboring farm. We called the Sheriff to ask if it was permitted and he said that it was "encouraged" and to have at it. I asked one of my friends who loves to hunt deer to come along and he looked at me with disgust. He said "I can't believe you would look at a beautiful lab with his tongue hanging out and kill him". I tried explaining to him that what he was picturing was something from a Disney movie and that feral dogs were just like coyotes. Apparently people are tossing their dogs a lot more now that the economy is in the crapper and the local governments aren't policing them like they did before.

I will be going this weekend. Now I just have to decide which rifle to use... SKS, Mak90 or M44 decisions... decisions...

LeonCarr
December 6, 2010, 12:07 PM
While deer hunting one afternoon in beautiful San Jacinto County, Texas, I was watching several does on a logging clearcut when two Heinz 57 type feral dogs came out and chased them away. Neither had collars, but both had 150 Nosler Ballistic Tips from a .308 shortly thereafter.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Art Eatman
December 6, 2010, 07:01 PM
Gonna get worse as the economy gets worse. Not just dogs. Horses, as well.

Justin Holder
December 6, 2010, 07:47 PM
Yeah, but you can eat a horse.

mstirton
December 7, 2010, 04:34 AM
feral horses?

I've seen a few strays but never a pack. Walking up on a pack in a narrow creek bed with high walls would be a little scary... also a little fun if with a buddy and 2 ARs.

Art Eatman
December 7, 2010, 10:15 AM
People have always dumped cats and dogs out in the country. Now, add horses--which can do bad things when intersecting with a car or pickup.

Safety tips: Driving at night, if you see a large animal in front of you, dim the lights and hit the horn.

If it's a deer in front of you, odds are that the deer's reflexes are to return to where it was known to be safe, so you try to steer to the deer's front.

Cows? Cows don't want to be headed back from where they were going, so you try to steer to the rear of a cow.

Horses, however, are suicidal. They will do their absolute best to remain in front of the headlights. Pray. A horse is an eight-hundred-pound bug coming through your windshield.

Hogs are boulders with legs. Don't hit one, but if you must, center it to avoid a rollover. And pray.

jimmyraythomason
December 7, 2010, 10:27 AM
I imagine there's a taboo about shooting dogs, Not so much here but it is illegal to kill one in Alabama. The state made that a felony. Any dog that becomes a problem just disappears. No one ever knows where it went........

Jbabbler
December 7, 2010, 02:58 PM
http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/hunting/2009/08/wild-dogs-kill-georgia-animal-lovers

Zombiphobia
December 7, 2010, 03:31 PM
I grew up on a farm and we'd occasionally have problems with strays and ferals. They carry diseases and can cause major problems.
Had one come up and decide to hang out on our porch once, he was snarling and foaming at the mouth. A .22LR shot to the head put an end to that.
Never had large packs like that though. At the most there would be 3 or 4 together roaming for food. Besides the rabid one on our porch none of them ever showed any aggression to people.

Jalexander
December 7, 2010, 10:05 PM
Last spring and summer, during the height of the drouth in central Texas, we lost eight head of cattle to packs of dogs from the subdivision on the other side of my fence. The dogs weren't feral - they were pets that had banded together to roam around and cause trouble. The dogs never ate any of the cattle, either, they just ran them to death and trotted back home.

I feel bad about shooting dogs, but since they cost us over $5000, not counting the calves we won't get out of those cows... Too bad. I think we and the neighboring ranch cleaned them out pretty well, but if I never see another dog pack, it'll be too soon.

788Ham
December 10, 2010, 12:18 AM
Several years ago a guy that raised Shetland ponies called my Pop and ask if he'd come help him, "Oh, and bring that old .300 Sav. with you." Seems as though a pack of 15 - 20 dogs had chased and ham strung 4 of his pregnant mares, then partially ate one of them. I think it was over a 3 week end period, they shot all but 3 of the dogs, found out it was neighbors dogs living around the ranchers place.

andrewstorm
December 10, 2010, 02:14 AM
Are very dangerous,even more so than black bears,and coyotes who pack up have killed humans,in detroit large packs of dogs have been seen roaming the abandoned factorys and torn down neighborhoods,and have attacked many people. arm up america, defend yourself ,cause nobody else will do as good a job.:cool:

d2wing
December 13, 2010, 02:59 PM
Dogs are much more apt to attack humans than coyotes or wolves. When I was a kid I had to help a neighbor shoot my own 2 pet dogs as they had killed some of my brothers sheep. I was the only one that the dogs would obey so we took them out in the pasture and the guy shot them. I was old enough to understand it had to be done. I was about 10. I've shot a few but never liked it. Cats can be tough to kill. My older brothers had to thin them out once in awhile.

If you enjoyed reading about "Feral dog hunting... memories from my youth" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!