what kind of spider is this? saw it in a deer stand


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yongxingfreesty
August 10, 2010, 12:39 AM
http://i34.tinypic.com/2rw875h.jpg

thought it was a blk widow b/c of the red mark on back and it being black, but had second thoughts when i compared online.

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Flintknapper
August 10, 2010, 01:00 AM
Not a black widow, not even close.

skiking
August 10, 2010, 01:06 AM
I don't know, but hope you squashed it.

ME Woodsman
August 10, 2010, 01:16 AM
looks like a dead spider hopefully :)

Double Naught Spy
August 10, 2010, 01:18 AM
Jumping spider

jbkebert
August 10, 2010, 01:21 AM
Boreal jumping spider. It is harmless creepy all the same but harmless.

MaterDei
August 10, 2010, 01:22 AM
Not sure what it is. I do know that it is not a black widow. Black Widows have comparatively smaller bodies and longer legs than the spider in this picture. I have a black widow in my kitchen in a glass right now that one of my kids captured a couple of days ago. fwiw, the only other poisonous spider around my parts is the brown recluse and the spider in the pic is not one of those either.

I see no reason for squashing it. :)

Cypress
August 10, 2010, 01:28 AM
We call 'em wolf spiders in East Texas. I'd keep him around to talk to when nothings moving!!!

Oyeboten
August 10, 2010, 01:30 AM
It's a mobile/roving Hunter-Predator Spider of some kind.

Short Legs, powerful build...not a Web Builder type, a roamer-Hunter.


Not a worry, harmless, and keeps other Bugs down, so, be nice to them...they're on your side.

WNTFW
August 10, 2010, 01:34 AM
Like Cypress, I've always heard them called wolf spiders.

Oyeboten
August 10, 2010, 01:36 AM
The supposed 'Wolf Spiders' I have had pointed out to me, were a hundred times the bulk of this one, as well as grey color, and a totally different shape and style.


Possibly people in ddifferent areas call anything a 'Wolf Spider' instead of finding out the correct name for whatever it is.


Lol...

jbkebert
August 10, 2010, 01:42 AM
http://a2.pbase.com/u36/lejun/small/32331829.spiderblack1.jpg
jumping spider
http://a2.pbase.com/u42/lejun/small/34236552.garspiderverybest3.jpg
wolf spider
http://medicalimages.allrefer.com/large/black-widow-spider-1.jpg
black widow spider

Purgatory
August 10, 2010, 02:05 AM
Absolutely, JB. Glad you posted those pics. Those dang Wolf spiders can do some damage. My father's calf lost about a fifth of it's mass from a bite he neglected from one of those things. They don't mess around.

Every time I see one in or around my home I assume the worst.

-That they're inside my home and it's only a matter of time before one gets me in my sleep.

So far, I've been lucky.

Always saw those jumping spiders everywhere outside growing up.

Luckily I've NEVER seen a Widow.

I'd say if you happen upon a Wolf, kill it or walk away.

If you see a Widow, squeal and RUN!

Wild Bunch
August 10, 2010, 02:13 AM
I used to keep Wolf Spiders as pets when I was a kid. We have some great big black Tarantula's out here and in the late summer and early fall you can find LOTS of them around. I've picked 'em up and moved them out of the road before. The only time I ever came close to getting bitten was when some fool tried to poke it with a stick. When it got irritated I stuck it in the guys face, he screamed like a little girl and ran. Hilarious! Spiders are not a big worry in CONUS, even the dreaded Brown Recluse statistically isn't much of a problem. I did manage to get bit in the neck by a Black Widow. Felt weird for about 5-6 hours and that was it. You guys have watched Arachnophobia one too many times.

A and O
August 10, 2010, 02:13 AM
Fairly common in SoCal. Not sure of the name, but jumping spider makes sense. I've seen them jump at flies and catch them. Kinda cool and seems to serve a noble purpose.

ArfinGreebly
August 10, 2010, 02:27 AM
There are several spiders with that general structure.

The bulk of them are reasonably harmless (barring allergies and stuff).

There are some spiders of that general form that are a whole lot less fun.

The Hobo spider:
http://media.canada.com/b325bd45-083d-4e30-a417-b72cfd0f2921/iStockHoboSpider.jpg?size=620x400


And my personal favorite, the Brown Recluse, or "Fiddleback" spider:
http://brown-recluse.com/images/br7-small.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/13/Brown-recluse-coin-edit.jpg/800px-Brown-recluse-coin-edit.jpg


Generally, the hunting spiders feed on other bugs and hold no hazard for people.

Certain brands, however, will flat ruin your day.

I've had a couple of close calls with Brown Recluse spiders (e.g. stepped out of shower, pulled (tan) towel off rack, brushed [something] off towel onto floor . . . and it took off running; caught it with a plastic cup) that made all the little short hairs bristle on my neck/arms/back.

Do the Google thing on those two spiders. Much fun.

Yours above looks like the generic hunting/jumping type. Benign for people, not so much for small insects.


Hope you got what you were hunting for.

FLAvalanche
August 10, 2010, 10:18 AM
We've got wolf spiders down here. It's cool because at night you shine your flashlight in the woods and you see tiny little reflective spots in the grass. The wolf spiders have reflective hairs on their butts.

Just be glad you don't have the spider in my attachment. It's a black and yellow argiope and they get about 4" across. The bad thing is that they make huge webs from one tree to another across the rows of the orange grove and if you're not careful at night you'll get a face full. They're harmless but your sphincter doesn't know that when you've got a 4" spider on your head.

ForumSurfer
August 10, 2010, 10:38 AM
You guys have watched Arachnophobia one too many times.

Venom has different effects on different people. I have a close friend who was bitten by a black widow. He felt it was pretty harmless, too. 4 hours later he was delirious and passed out. His body was visibly tense. A trip to the er and all was well. Probably not fatal for an adult human, but it will ruin your day if left untreated.

You also need to factor in that males inject far less venom. You could be bitten by a male black widow and never even know it since it injects far less, if any venom. Only the females deliver massive amounts of venom.

Double Naught Spy
August 10, 2010, 10:56 AM
FLAvalanche, your spider is a male zigzag spider, known for their common zigzag web pattern. The genus is Argiope.

Venom has different effects on different people. I have a close friend who was bitten by a black widow. He felt it was pretty harmless, too. 4 hours later he was delirious and passed out. His body was visibly tense. A trip to the er and all was well. Probably not fatal for an adult human, but it will ruin your day if left untreated.

You also need to factor in that males inject far less venom. You could be bitten by a male black widow and never even know it since it injects far less, if any venom. Only the females deliver massive amounts of venom.

Your friend's black widow reaction was to a neurotoxin. There are also spiders that inject necrotic venom that destroys tissue. Then there is the issue of infections associated with bites, even when venom isn't injected.

Part of the reason that different people are affected differently by bites then is that there are different types of venoms, injected in differing amounts, and then the sensitivity of the bitee to the venom. Some folks are not very sensitive to the neurotoxin of the black widow, though the bite may still be painful and cause a localized reaction.

wombat13
August 10, 2010, 01:35 PM
FLAvalanche, your spider is a male zigzag spider, known for their common zigzag web pattern. The genus is Argiope.


I saw one of these spiders for the first time this summer when I was pruning black raspberry canes in my yard. It has a very menacing appearance so I had to do the research and found it to be a female black and yellow garden spider, aka zig-zag spider. Apparently harmless to humans, so I let her be.

Fortunately, they don't get to be 4" up here. The one in my yard is only about 2" (including legs). Even knowing she's harmless and is "only" 2" across, I kept my eye on her when I was pruning close to her web.

Dave P
August 10, 2010, 01:59 PM
We get these by the thousands in the FL North Woods:

http://davidmichaelkennedy.com/blog/media/heather-banana-spider.jpg

I had to pull off my shorts this weekend - one disappeared in there somewhere!

oasis618
August 10, 2010, 02:01 PM
It seems like anytime someone sees a spider in my neck of the woods, it's a "wolf spider". Kinda like any small bird is a sparrow. Oh well, I love a good spider thread.

DIM
August 10, 2010, 02:06 PM
I know its the itsy bitsy spider :-)) seriously the camera lens is out of focus to identify it...

FLAvalanche
August 10, 2010, 02:27 PM
I kept my eye on her when I was pruning close to her web.

Their web is pretty strong. I was actually impressed at how strong a single strand is. If felt like fishing monofilament.

DIM
August 10, 2010, 03:02 PM
here is one seating on my tomato bush, should I kill it..? seem OK for now, not bugging me and keeps pest away...

http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/1011/itsybitsy.jpg

CoRoMo
August 10, 2010, 03:04 PM
I used to love to capture jumping spiders in a jar, when I was a kid. I'd then catch a live fly, get it into the jar with the spider, and watch the show.

jimmyraythomason
August 10, 2010, 03:21 PM
FLAvalanche, your spider is a male zigzag spider, known for their common zigzag web pattern. We call these BIG M spiders in Alabama (at least in my neck of the woods). As to the one in the OP,that is known around here as a male wolf spider(may not be right but that is what we know it as). The picture above of a wolf spider we know as a female wolf spider. Whether it's right or wrong is only important if bitten as they are usually squashed seconds after discovery.

Hunterdad
August 10, 2010, 04:38 PM
Its a wolf spider.

Double Naught Spy
August 10, 2010, 04:53 PM
Nomenclature and identification are interesting points of consideration and this thread shows some interesting variations. Part of the reason for scientific names is because common names get used without review or considerations for consistency and as a result cause confusion, such as between jumping spider and wolf spider.

This is expecially common with harvestmen and daddy long legs. Actual daddy long legs are true spiders (Order Araneae). What are commonly called daddy long legs are actually harvestmen (Order Opiliones) and are not true spiders (no venom and no silk glands). At least here in north Texs, harvestmen are common, though usually called daddy long legs. I have seen and collected daddy long legs, but only very infrequently compared to harvestmen.

2ndAmFan
August 10, 2010, 05:29 PM
Op's pic shows a jumping spider, AKA wolf spider, AKA fly spider. They're rarely larger than about the diameter of a dime including legs. They're furry and some are gray rather than black. Harmless to humans as far as I know but they eat lots of bugs so I leave them alone.

gbran
August 10, 2010, 05:39 PM
Don't ever fiddle around with a violin spider.

351 WINCHESTER
August 10, 2010, 10:03 PM
The banana spiders were introduced into ne fl back in the 60's when we imported bananas that were in crates. Nowdays they are imported in shipping containers and they are not a problem. Back in the day everyone got a box of bananas when a ship was unloading. It was fairly uncommon not to find a syider or two.

bensdad
August 10, 2010, 10:27 PM
My daughter was flipping out one time about spiders in the house. I told her that the only poison spider in MN was the brown rec. and that there were hardly any of them here. I further told her that a bite, even though poisonous, was not a big deal... maybe a trip to the doctor for a shot of cortisone or something. She continued to be nuts about it. I said, "look. This is all that happens..." and I googled images of brown recluse bites. Bad idea.

CoastieShep
August 10, 2010, 11:20 PM
I really hate those big banana spiders or whatever they're called. Things are too big to be natural. LOL

yongxingfreesty
August 11, 2010, 12:11 AM
speaking of big spiders. here are a few pics of some abnormal spiders i have never seen in the city. freaked the hell out of me when it got tangled in my face on the polaris and as i was walking through te forest at night. screamed and threw my hands like a little girl lol.

yongxingfreesty
August 11, 2010, 12:17 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/yongxingliang/IMG_1503.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/yongxingliang/IMG_1482.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/yongxingliang/IMG_1480.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/yongxingliang/IMG_1504.jpg

Atticum
August 11, 2010, 02:25 PM
My daughter was flipping out one time about spiders in the house. I told her that the only poison spider in MN was the brown rec. and that there were hardly any of them here. I further told her that a bite, even though poisonous, was not a big deal... maybe a trip to the doctor for a shot of cortisone or something. She continued to be nuts about it. I said, "look. This is all that happens..." and I googled images of brown recluse bites. Bad idea.

HAH!

:banghead:

that wasn't a good idea at all... Poor girl probably didn't sleep for three days!

W.E.G.
August 11, 2010, 02:35 PM
Luckily I've NEVER seen a Widow.

There were several of them nested under the overhang for the Death Valley range (Calvin Lloyd Ranges - range 4) at Quantico several years ago. The were set up right out in the open, at the 90-degree juncture of the top of the wall an the overhang lip.

They each had a crazy-web sort of set up.
Looks like there is no plan to it at all.

We didn't mess with them, and they didn't mess with us.

Looks like a small grape, with legs -- and the telltale hourglass.

CTPhil
August 11, 2010, 05:48 PM
Another vote for jumping spider, common and harmless. Not to be confused with the much more unpleasant barking spider.

FLAvalanche
August 11, 2010, 09:07 PM
We call these BIG M spiders in Alabama

That's what we call em in Florida but BIG M is usually followed by OTHERF@*$ER.

millertyme
August 17, 2010, 09:23 PM
It looks like a jumping spider. They're a pretty utilitarian spider, but only grow about as big as a nickel, maybe a quarter. Harmless to humans unless they are carrying bacteria and bite you. You might end up with necrotic staph, something people often misdiagnose as a brown recluse bite. The jumping spiders are great to have around, just like Wolf Spiders. I tried not to kill any of them in and around the house unless they got a little too comfortable, like the one that found its way into my son's bed. Every now and then you'd see them, but you'd never see cockroaches and you rarely see flies.

Wolf Spiders get big- really big, like 2-3 inches in legspan. Also relatively harmless unless you are allergic to the toxins, but great for killing cockroaches. Their legs are considerably longer than they are wide, and considerably longer than the width of their body.

jimmyraythomason
August 17, 2010, 09:29 PM
Every now and then you'd see them, but you'd never see cockroaches and you rarely see flies.
I don't know about that particular spider but most spiders here won't eat roaches.

millertyme
August 17, 2010, 09:37 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Wolf_spider_white_bg.jpg
Wolf Spider

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_flMrrg3qh0o/SqUSIOH_Q2I/AAAAAAAAAyc/Q1Gt2saQzeg/Jumping+Spider.JPG
Jumping Spider

Oyeboten
August 17, 2010, 09:56 PM
Then too, there's this -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHzdsFiBbFc

WardenWolf
August 17, 2010, 10:12 PM
Wolf spiders. . .we have a few variants of those out here in Arizona. They're harmless, and fast as hell, so we generally ignore them. They're WAY too much effort to try to catch them. I've seen a few of the jumping spiders, too. Plenty of black widows as well. WD-40 works wonders on black widows. Hit them with a direct hit and they drop dead instantly.

Double Naught Spy
August 18, 2010, 10:00 AM
I have a trick for some of you to try. I know this works well in the south during warm weather anyway. Go out after dark into your yard with a decent flashlight. Hold the flashlight up at eye level and scan your yard. You will likely see dozens or maybe even hundreds of tiny sparkle reflections that look like they might be dew drops catching the beam of light. If you watch carefully, some will disappear and some new ones will appear. Cool.

Okay, now spot a particular sparkle and walk up to it slowly until you can find what is making the sparkle. More often than not, it will be a wolf spider. The sparkles you see when you scan the yard are just the spiders looking in your direction at the time. In my yard, I will see about 1-2 for every square yard of grass. No doubt there are many more that aren't looking in my direction.

jmorris
August 18, 2010, 10:54 AM
even the dreaded Brown Recluse statistically isn't much of a problem.

Yeah, I got bit by one over 4 of July week end, 3 visits to the Doc plus 4 different meds and it’s almost gone finally.

Although there have been confirmed deaths from black widows and brown recluse spiders they are extremely rare.

Dnaltrop
August 18, 2010, 02:17 PM
Hobos are the big worry here, but we fumigate fairly regularly. (the dry smoke kind, those sprays just leave a poison circle)

Wife took a hobo bite on her shin, gave her a necrotic spot about the size of a quarter for 3 years.

Her pinky took a bite 2 years ago, it's finally clearing up.


I think it's time to turn the house into the Insect Apocalypse again...

jimmyraythomason
August 18, 2010, 02:34 PM
Really,our biggest problems in the deer blind (during the early season)are red wasp and copperheads. Black widows show from time to time but are easily dealt with.

Cosmoline
August 18, 2010, 02:47 PM
I've gotten on friendly terms with the opiliones (harvestmen) that swarm by the millions around here. They're not even spiders and have no venom. And I try to encourage web builders esp. around my crocks of sauerkraut to keep down the fruit flies. But I still cannot abide a wolf spider. They're just too huge to be acceptable.

Owen
August 18, 2010, 03:13 PM
jumping spiders and wolf spiders are nothing to be worried about.

FLAvalanche
August 18, 2010, 05:50 PM
The sparkles you see when you scan the yard are just the spiders looking in your direction at the time.

I've always heard it's the hairs on their butts that are reflective.

Warhawk83
August 18, 2010, 07:48 PM
We call 'em wolf spiders in East Texas.

NE Louisiana as well,completely harmless, they just hang out and watch.

Ranger J
August 19, 2010, 02:43 PM
It is a jumping spider, 'Mostly harmless'. In our area there is a jumping spider just the color of the lichens on the Oak Trees that our deer stands are in. Looking for them gives you something to do when the deer aren't moving. If you really want to get a hold of how many spiders there are in a given area go out side early on a really foggy day and check out the webs and remember not all spiders spin webs. Just think about how many insects are caught every day by spiders. Without them we would be up to our bottoms in bugs. I have been bitten twice once by Brown Recluse and once by Black Widow. The Recluse bite was worse or maybe it was where it accrued?

RJ

sargas23
August 19, 2010, 04:03 PM
I wouldn't say the bite of a brown recluse spider isn't dangerous. I lost a good friend of mine because he was bitten by one while he was out in his garage cleaning up junk. He got bit but didn't think it was a big deal. Within a week, he was in the hospital in very bad shape. By the time 2 weeks had gone by, he was dead. They are usually NOT that dangerous to the majority of people out there, but if you get bit, I'd go see a doctor immediately just to be safe.

Oyeboten
August 19, 2010, 04:57 PM
I have many Black Widows here, and far as I have ever seen, they are shy, easy going, and glad to be downright friendly if treated friendly.

You'd have to really be oblivious to get bit by one, and, they will usually retreat rather than aggress anyway, if accidently bothered or bumped.


All the ones here, if I hold out a finger with a drop of Water on it, and talk to them, they come on over to the edge of their Web, and drink the water from my finger tip.

They learn your Voice pretty fast, and will come when called to say 'Hello'...and or to have a few sips of Water, if their Bug Catching enterprise has been slow.



If one must move them to a new spot, it is easy to do on a Tissue or Kleenex, or, if gently, one can encourage them to climb from their Web, and onto one's Palm, and ride to the great outdoors that a way, which they are glad to do so long as one is patient and easy with them...about the same as anyone, really, would be under similar conditions.


Lots of Cellar Spiders here also, who make high Webs and hang upside down in them.


On and on...Grass Spiders, Net Web Spiders, Hunter-Preditor Spiders...


If one gets a suspected Brown Recluse bite, best thing to do is excise the initial necrotic condition with a slender new 'Xacto' Knife, and then sprinkle in any sort of good topical antibiotic, such as Nitrofurizone.


It'll never amount to anything worth mentioning, then...and or will be entirely healed in a day or two.


But, do not excise the initial necrotic locus, and you will very likely have some remorse.


If not sure what kind of bite it is, see if it has a gooey usually greyish, necrotizing center some little ways under the skin...and if it does, it is a Spider bite of some sort then.

Spiders inject enzymes which liquify tissues.

Easy to excise, and better safe than sorry if not sure what kind of Spider has done the bite.

I used to do a lot of outdoors Work, cleaning out old Barns and Sheds and Outbuilding and so on, and, sometimes, end of the day, I would find a Spider bite or two, usually wrists or ankles or belt line of waist.

I'd excise as described, and never had any problems.
'

Other guys I knew or worked with, doing similar work, now and then would develop what was likely a Brown Recluse bite syndrome, of a widening punky or ulcerated lesion, to the Bone even, and endless hassles and discomforts and dr bills and systemic med regimens, and so on...horrid...

Hence my advocay of an easy, pre-emptive if mildly invasive procedure, a simple forthright pragmatic, to ensure no such eventuations occur.

Zeke Markham
August 19, 2010, 05:18 PM
And then there are camel spiders, google them, scary stuff right there, they DO chase you. Pictures removed, way too big, sorry.

millertyme
August 20, 2010, 01:01 AM
Oyeboten, that's on the edge of what I'd call crazy.

Diggers
August 20, 2010, 05:21 PM
+1 on the little bit crazy Oyeboten.:what:

Ever think of going to the ER? There are guys there that do that kinda thing for a living. :)

BTW killing spiders just because they are spiders is BAD MOJO, just so you all know. :eek:

Leave em alone.

jimmyraythomason
August 20, 2010, 06:07 PM
Leave em alone.
Depends on the species and WHERE they are. Black widows and brown recluses are dead anywhere I find them,espeacially around my house.

sleepyone
August 20, 2010, 07:15 PM
A good friend of mine was picking mustang grapes on her farm, in shorts :what:, and got bit by something. She did not realize it until that night when she took a bath and felt some soreness on her lower leg and a faint red mark. The next morning she started feeling nauseated, feverish and achy. Her leg started swelling. She was in the hospital that night. Her foot swelled so much that her heal split open. She was delirious. She spent four days in the hospital and took another week to get over it. Her leg was still swollen two weeks later. However, her flesh never rotted and the actual bite mark was never bigger than a pinhead. They are pretty sure it was a black widow. Nothing else around here, North Texas, could cause that kind of reaction.

I told her she should call her mustang grape jelly "The Black Widow Jelly" and sell it for $50/jar to recover her medical expenses!

I always assumed Black Widows were only in garages, sheds, etc... but a friend said they have severe infestations in their shrubs. Makes sense. Black Widows were around long before we were building garages. Now I look twice before poking my hand in our flowerbeds.

jimmyraythomason
August 21, 2010, 07:32 AM
mustang grapes Er...what are "mustang grapes"?

Todd1700
August 21, 2010, 08:52 AM
You guys have watched Arachnophobia one too many times.


Ahhhh, no. I'm a RN and I have treated people in the ER bitten by black widow spiders. It is far from a trivial matter. They inject a neuro toxin that causes intense pain and muscle spasms. Although rarely life threatening I've seen people in so much pain that 10 mg of IV morphine and 10 mg of IV valium given one behind the other didn't touch it. If you truely got bitten by an actual Black Widow, which I doubt, and had symptoms that mild then count yourself lucky because that is not the norm.

Oyeboten, that's on the edge of what I'd call crazy.


Amen. Man I honestly don't mean to be ugly but your post describes behavior so stupid that I hope no one seriously takes it to heart. Sorry for the name calling and if the mods ban me for it all I ask as a last request is that they remove your post also before some kid reads it and thinks it's okay to serve black widows water drops from your finger or move them alive using a tissue. LORD HAVE MERCY!!

bison
August 22, 2010, 02:20 PM
Now THIS is a spider - a camel spider (or Solifugae, to be precise). Very nasty creatures common in desert areas throughout the world. We'd catch them in Africa and the middle east and match them up against scorpions. They have incredibly sharp front teeth that they use to rip up their prey.

LoonWulf
August 22, 2010, 06:42 PM
The only spider of interest ive seen out here in hawaii were Recluse and maybe a few widows. The big cane spiders/ banana spiders are the ones i really dont like, but as long as they arnt trying to jump on me ill leave them alone....centipedes, now they are just down right mean, nasty, vandictive critters.

Trumac
August 22, 2010, 06:51 PM
Camel spiders aren't actually spiders from what I remember. They are nasty, though. Saw a number of them in the middle east myself.

JohnKSa
August 22, 2010, 08:40 PM
Those dang Wolf spiders can do some damage. My father's calf lost about a fifth of it's mass from a bite he neglected from one of those things. They don't mess around.Wolf spider bites might cause swelling and itching local to the bite. If there was tissue loss due to a wolf spider bite it wasn't directly due to the effects of the venom. There may have been an issue with a severe allergy or a secondary infection, but more likely the spider involved wasn't a wolf spider.

Getting bitten by a large spider will hurt because they have big "teeth" (fangs) and poking a hole with the fangs will hurt. We had one of the "garden spiders" (Argiope) in a web near the front door for awhile and I would feed it grasshoppers from time to time. In the beginning she was pretty small and I had to find little hoppers for her, but over the summer she grew pretty large and it got to where she could handle any size hopper I caught. The sound of her fangs scratching around on the "armor" of a big grasshopper trying to puncture it was pretty grisly.

That said, only the Widow and Recluse families (in terms of spiders native to North America) should cause any sort of serious effect in people who don't have some sort of specific allergy.

The Hobo spider (and others of the "funnel web family") may also cause some serious effects, but they are introduced species, not native to North America. Still, they are common in the Pacific Northwest.Harmless to humans unless they are carrying bacteria and bite you.I'm not super up-to-date on the latest research, but the last material I read that addressed this issue indicated that there are no spiders known to be vectors for any microorganisms known to cause disease in humans.

The spider in the OP is a jumping spider. It is a harmless spider and they're fairly interesting as spiders go. We have high ceilings in the front room and once in a great while a jumping spider will get on the ceiling and go on safari looking for a bug. It's fun to get the laser pointer out and see how long the spider will chase the red glowing "bug" around.Okay, now spot a particular sparkle and walk up to it slowly until you can find what is making the sparkle. More often than not, it will be a wolf spider. The sparkles you see when you scan the yard are just the spiders looking in your direction at the time. In my yard, I will see about 1-2 for every square yard of grass. No doubt there are many more that aren't looking in my direction.The brighter the light and the darker the night, the more impressive this is.Camel spiders aren't actually spiders from what I remember. That's correct. They're arachnids, but they're in a different order than spiders are. Some other orders in the arachnid class are scorpions, harvestmen, spiders and ticks. The members of the order that contains camel spiders (solpugids) aren't usually dangerous to humans although getting bitten by something with fangs that big wouldn't be fun.before some kid reads it and thinks it's okay to serve black widows water drops from your finger or move them alive using a tissue. LORD HAVE MERCY!!Black Widows are not very mobile when they're not in their web and they aren't aggressive. Most spider bites result from a spider being accidentally grabbed or crushed. Moving a widow around on a tissue isn't very dangerous although one could easily make the case that it's a risk that need not be taken.

I won't be trying to feed a venomous spider water from my fingertip any time soon. I would say that's more risky than transporting a widow on a tissue though I wouldn't say it's crazy dangerous--it just goes beyond my personal risk threshold.

By the way, brown recluses are a completely different story from the widows. They are very fast when they want to be. Trying to move one of them on a tissue would be a bad idea.

Arkansas Paul
August 22, 2010, 11:49 PM
If it's a non poisonous spider and it just hangs out in it's web, I'd leave it in the stand. He'll kill any insect that gets caught in the web. They have a job to do as well. Now the poisonous ones like black widows or brown recluses get killed immediately.

Todd1700
August 23, 2010, 07:47 AM
One more bit of info as to a spot you might encounter a black widow. One of the first jobs I ever had as kid right out of high school was working for the town I lived in. Once a month we would go around and read peoples water meters so the monthly bills could be prepared. Those concrete water meter boxes submerged in the ground with just the little metal flap on the top were a black widow haven. Even in a little small town of 700 or so folks we killed dozens every month. So be very careful if you ever have need to fool with the one in your yard. Never put your hand into one without inspecting the inside.

The spider in the OP is a jumping spider.

Correct and also as you said totally harmless.

Wolf spider bites might cause swelling and itching local to the bite. If there was tissue loss due to a wolf spider bite it wasn't directly due to the effects of the venom.

There are some bad types of bacteria out there, most commonly some types of Staphylococcus Aureus, that can enter the body at the site of almost any type of bug bite and cause a nasty necrotic wound. These type infections are far, far, more commonly the reason for such a wound than a brown recluse bite. But the victims of such infections are almost always convinced they were bitten by a brown recluse despite not seeing what bit them at all.

BRad704
August 23, 2010, 01:02 PM
Here goes my spider encounter story...

I have had 3 close calls that I can remember with the brown recluse and black widow...

BR: First is like someone said on the front page, went to grab a towel and one dropped out of the fold just before i put it to my wet head...

BR: second was in our old apartment... I half woke up cause something tickled my face, so I brushed at it, then I felt it scurry across my chest, so I flipped and swatted at it... in the floor was the mashed up body of a brown recluse... :O

Black widow... I was pulling a roll of flowerbed matting off the garage shelf and felt something strong, stringy and sticky... as I pulled my hand back, the BW came out with the web stuck to my hand! I ended up killing that one on the garage floor.

As for the other spiders around West TN, we have the wolf spiders everywhere and I have a couple of garden spiders (the yellow and black ones) around my house now. I will leave those alone until they get to where my family would be (inside or on the patio) because they are all overly afraid and I'd rather spare them the trauma...

Art Eatman
August 23, 2010, 01:34 PM
I have the occasional black widow spider in my pumphouse or garage. I've found that a brief squirt of starting fluid or brake cleaner solves the problem. WD40 works, but more slowly.

JimKirk
August 25, 2010, 11:59 PM
Plenty of Black Widows in mail boxes... ask me how I know ... Mail man for 35 years!

lloveless
August 31, 2010, 06:19 AM
Whenever my wife calls "Oh great white hunter" I know to bring the daisy red ryder to dispatch a large spider in the house. Generally a very large wolf spider.
ll

BRad704
August 31, 2010, 01:13 PM
Seriously?

303Jeff
September 2, 2010, 03:27 AM
Let me say this, I HATE SPIDERS! Almost as much as I hate snakes. BUT, I always leave Argiopes (we call them signature spiders because of the cool web), Trapdoor/Funnel Trap spiders or Tarantulas alone, I dunno why but they're cool with me. We have a lot of funnel traps and argiopes around right now. Biggest argiope on the property set a new record for us. Roughly 6 inches. Don't know how but she's absolutely massive. We feed the trap spiders like pets, because they help us out.

I usually kill hunting spiders though. The most common kind around here are green with black accents on the body. They are completely nomadic and even carry their eggs with them until they hatch. Apparently wasps will sting them in such a way that they can't move, then lay their eggs in them so the baby wasps can eat the spider alive as they grow up. I've seen wasps dragging brain dead spiders around the yard many times, and can't help but laugh. The only thing funnier would be seeing a mongoose kill a **** SNAKE!

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