Quality of Sako


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LHRGunslinger
August 16, 2010, 05:22 AM
I'm thinking about getting a .308 rifle. How does Sako stack up against other brands? I've heard very little about them.

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Abel
August 16, 2010, 06:05 AM
They are top notch. Buy with confidence.

bpl
August 16, 2010, 06:09 AM
They are top notch. Buy with confidence.

+1

I don't own one, but I'd sure like to!

Finnlight in 6.5x55 Swedish would be nice!

Horsemany
August 16, 2010, 07:59 AM
They are built very well. I've owned many but they all go down the road after a bit. The stock doesn't fit me well and I always feel like I'm reaching for the trigger. They are very well made though. The accuracy I've had with my model 75's and 85's was above average but not better than most other guns I own like Browning A-Bolt/X-Bolts, Tikka, and 700's.

RainDodger
August 16, 2010, 10:54 AM
I have an early 70s Sako L579 Forester heavy barrel in .243. It's a keeper. Very accurate, although it took some experimentation to find the reloads it likes the best. It is easily sub-MOA though.

Look at older Sakos as well as new ones, if you're able.

Uncle Mike
August 16, 2010, 12:00 PM
The Sako is for the most part a 'pretty' rifle exhibiting better than average craftsmanship as to the metal work, the stocks are nearly perfect comparatively, mainly in material and finish.

Accuracy, well, accuracy in this country seems to equate with cost, however things arn't always as they seem in this arena.

The Sako tends not to be as accurate as MANY other ho hum, average, and much less costly rifles available today. This is by no means to say that the Sako is sloppy, to the point that a man can't bag anything he shoots at within his skill, but that, for the money you'll drop on the rifle, don't expect stellar accuracy from it.

If 'pretty' and quality looking craftsmanship is ahead of half MOA accuracy, then the Sako may be for you!

All the Sako's we have set-up for customers generally produce 1.5" or slightly better groups when used with ammo the rifle likes, and have gone to 2" at 100y.

HGUNHNTR
August 16, 2010, 12:08 PM
Sako is top notch in accuracy as well as fit and finish. Like Tikka they have a 1 moa guarantee with factory ammo. Sako is a fine piece of craftsmanship for a factory rifle.

Hatterasguy
August 16, 2010, 12:56 PM
Great rifles, I like the TRG series if we had places to shoot 1k yards in CT I would own a TRG42.

bhk
August 16, 2010, 02:55 PM
My Sakos have been exceptionally accurate. The triggers are superb, which helps a lot.

HKGuns
August 23, 2010, 12:32 PM
I think you're smoking crack there Uncle Mike. Sako's are widely acknowledged as having a reputation as one of the best out of the box accuracy rifles. Their triggers are outstanding as well and break like a piece of glass between your fingers, which helps quite a bit.

I only recently purchased one, so my experience is limited, but I read a lot about them and based on my limited experience with the rifle what I've read is largely accurate.

CB900F
August 23, 2010, 12:48 PM
Fella's;

And then there's Tikka. Produced in the Sako factory, on the same machines, just doesn't have the fancy & handwork. Therefore, they cost less, and look kinda plain-Jane. But man can they shoot! Although I don't own a Sako, I got multiple Tikkas, and seriously wonder about the above statement that a Sako is only so-so in the accuracy department.

900F

Uncle Mike
August 23, 2010, 01:05 PM
I think you're smoking crack there Uncle Mike. Sako's are widely acknowledged as having a reputation as one of the best out of the box accuracy rifles. Their triggers are outstanding as well and break like a piece of glass between your fingers, which helps quite a bit.


Never smoked....anything, buddy. Just the point that, for the money you'll drop on your Sako, don't expect to wring out above average accuracy, I did not say Sako was inaccurate, but only that, other, ho hum, and much less expensive rifles, will often times outshoot, or at worst, hang with your beloved Sako!

A LOT of money is made based on the, 'it HAS to be good, I spent a LOT of money on it' philosophy... I know, this is how most of us in the, 'we'll build what you need, or think you need', firearm business make money!

Simple math, how does a $1500 rifle that will shoot into a half inch at, let's keep it simple, 100y fare better than a $400 rifle that will do the same, all day long?

It must be the stock, trinkets and name....but if all that's not a deciding, and/or important factor for you, then what do you have, a barrel screwed into a bolt action receiver, costing two thirds more than one that will perform the same.

Nothing wrong with the Sako rifle, the OP did ask our opinion on how they stacked up against 'other' rifles....I simply reflected here, my opinion!

SpeedAKL
August 23, 2010, 01:19 PM
Sako is pretty good stuff. In terms of price, fit and finish, etc. they tend to stack up alongside the higher-end Remington 700s and Winny Model 70s as well as the Weatherby Mark V, T/C Icon, Kimber, Browning X-Bolt, etc. Their Tikka line is also a nice rifle that competes with the more standard 700s as well as the Weatherby Vanguard, Savages, and the like.

Geno
August 23, 2010, 02:09 PM
I had a Sako Finnbear (laminated stock), in .270 Win. It was extremely accurate, but the stock cracked under the bolt handle. When I went to have it repaired/replaced, I was told that it was only a cosmetic issue, and since it didn't effect accuracy, I would have to live with it. :scrutiny:

So, over the course of a few months, I worked up some hand loads. I was using 60 grains of AA 3100, a 130 grain Nosler Ballstic tip bullet, and a Federal 210M primer. The brass was Federal, and had been form fired and neck resized only, using custom-made dies. Now, that is not a barn-burner of a load. It is the go-to load for a .270 Win.

One day, the firing pin pierced a primer. The hot gases escaping "blow-torched" the face of the Mauser'like bolt, and created a good-sized pit in the steel. With that mishap, I came to view Sako steel as being far inferior to Remington, Winchester and Weatherby steel. I never have witnessed a Remington, Winchester or Weatherby have its bolt face deformed/"blow-torched" from a blown load.

When I took the Finnbear back to the dealer, I was told I had abused the rifle, and furthermore, since the "blow-torched" bolt face didn't effect the rifle's accuracy, basically, I would have to live with it. The dealer, and the representative I spoke with from Sako forgot one option. I could exercise my consumer right, off-the-Finnbear and buy myself a Weatherby Mark V (or any other rifle).

Hello Weatherby, Mark V Ddeluxe in .257 Wea Mag! Good-bye, hasta nunca, ciao, hit the road-babe and don't call me...Sako. Hello USA-made, good-bye dollars flying over-seas. Guess I have expressed my sentiments well. Sako may be good, and accurate, but when the after-the-sale service stinks to high-Heaven. I'd just as soon buy something made right here.

JMHO,

Geno

DRYHUMOR
August 23, 2010, 02:49 PM
The "sleepers" out there are the M-995/TRG-S rifles. Hunting rifles with the action of the TRG tactical rifles, and far less cost. Three locking lugs, very robust reciever. Very accurate. Adjusting the trigger is easy and it will adjust to "just right".

You have to like a black stock however, or be willing to paint it how you want it. I'm thinking McMillan makes a replacement. But, that's just an additional cost, you can spend on ammo or optics.

I have yet to see a .308 come on the marketplace, I imagine it would sell quick and/or for good money. The average I see them for is 800.00 give or take 100.00. I have 2, one in 6.5x55 and one in 25-06.

The early Sako with action identifiers AII, AIII, AIV etc, have a very good rep for being well built and accurate.

There are pre-Garcia, Garcia, Stoeger, and Beretta stamped rifles out there. These were the importers and kind of help to date a particular rifle, other than serial number.

The early ones just classy compared to the offerings out now. Just my opinion. I still miss the Finnbear Deluxe I sold off from time to time.....

HKGuns
August 23, 2010, 03:20 PM
Simple math, how does a $1500 rifle that will shoot into a half inch at, let's keep it simple, 100y fare better than a $400 rifle that will do the same, all day long?

How about an $800 stainless/synthetic rifle that compares quite favorably with similar stainless offerings? I don't know where you are finding $400 rifles, most of the used Remington's I was looking at are more than $500. Heck, my Winchester Model 70 Super Shadow was more than $400 and it is just a plain Jayne blued model with a scope that couldn't have been more than $50.

You're not counting a trigger job, or replacement, on that $400 rifle that will be required for it to compare favorably with the Sako. You're also not getting a hammer forged match barrel with said $400 rifle.........Suffice it to say I think you're being unduly harsh on Sako. But, I have a lot of good experience with Beretta shotguns so I'm probably a bit biased the other way.

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s9/v13/p943958324-5.jpg

Ankeny
August 23, 2010, 03:45 PM
I have tinkered off and on with Sako rifles for many years. I had an older L579 Forester with a light barrel in 22-250 that shot just OK and nothing better. I had it redone into a .250 Savage Improved. I also had a .270 Deluxe with the engraved floor plate, skip line checkering, and so forth. What a beautiful rifle. The rifle shot around 2 inches with 130 and 150 grain bullets in various loads and factory offerings. I spent a bunch of money to have it pillar bedded by one of the country's better gunsmiths, and it finally produced groups in the 1 1/2 inch range. Those two rifles pretty much fit into Uncle Mike's ho-hum category.

Last year I found a 6.5x55 Sako model 75 in a local sporting goods store. The factory claims an accuracy guarantee of one minute or better. I bought the rifle, even though I am not a fan of dovetail scope mounting. I mounted a Zeiss Conquest scope on the rifle with Sako Optilock mounts and rings. The front mount is an extended mount in order to get the proper eye relief. So, there I was with a reverse mount coupled up to rings that sport a plastic insert. Far from my usual Picatinny rail and tactical ring set-up. I thought I had screwed up before I even shot the rifle. FWIW, I am regularly getting half MOA with 120 grain Hornady A-max bullets over a healthy dose of Reloader 19. For big game hunting, I shoot 140 Nosler Accubonds. Last week, while I was doping a drop chart, I managed a 3 shot group measuring 2 1/4 inches center to center at 500 yards. I couldn't be happier...or more surprised.

I came to view Sako steel as being far inferior to Remington. I certainly hate to put this on the Internet, but here goes. I can tell you for a fact my Sako 75 can withstand a load of VV-N550 that is 6 grains over the published max with nothing more than a damaged extractor...that and the spring was welded to the bolt. Don't ask...

UnTainted
August 23, 2010, 03:51 PM
my sako finnbear 30'06 shoots sub.5 moa cold bore groups

I regularly shoot deer beyond 400 yards in the NV highlands, and this gun puts 'em where I point.

And, as they'd say in the south, it's niiiiiiiiiiiccccccccccsssssseeeeee

Uncle Mike
August 23, 2010, 03:57 PM
I don't know where you are finding $400 rifles, most of the used Remington's I was looking at are more than $500. Heck, my Winchester Model 70 Super Shadow was more than $400 and it is just a plain Jayne blued model with a scope that couldn't have been more than $50.

Yeah, I was thinking more along the lines of a Marlin X Series, or the Stevens 200.....

I have seen them spank Sako/Tikka....

You're not counting a trigger job, or replacement, on that $400 rifle that will be required for it to compare favorably with the Sako.

Don't have too...triggers on some of the el cheapo rifles compare with the Sako, even those of us that play with firearms all day for a living would be hard pressed to tell much, if any difference between the trigger of some of the 4 or 5 hundred dollar rifles and the Sako rifle.

You're also not getting a hammer forged match barrel with said $400 rifle....

Thank goodness.....!

Suffice it to say I think you're being unduly harsh on Sako.

I think, you think I think, Sako is junk....not so my friend, not so! Sako is a fine, fine rifle, I simply answered the OP's question with my opinion of "don't think your getting any enhanced, or 'extra' accuracy from a Sako because of the High price you paid for it"....but, then again, there are a lot of firearms that fall into this group, not just a Sako!

I'll say that about many of the 'custom' rifles built today, even o**s, they are NOT worth what they cost!


BTW....nice rig.

Uncle Mike
August 23, 2010, 04:01 PM
certainly hate to put this on the Internet, but here goes. I can tell you for a fact my Sako 75 can withstand a load of VV-N550 that is 6 grains over the published max with nothing more than a damaged extractor...that and the spring was welded to the bolt. Don't ask...


heheheheheheh....There is nothing inferior with Sako steel! Maybe what happened to Geno was one of those strange goings on! hehehe

HKGuns
August 23, 2010, 04:02 PM
BTW....nice rig.

Thanks......

Radjxf
August 23, 2010, 04:03 PM
My old Sako AV and new Tikka T3 are each in another league in terms of accuracy and fit/finish vs. any "$400 gun" I've ever fired.

I think the "ho-hum" guy enjoys a higher profit margin on the $400 guns he sells....YMMV.

Uncle Mike
August 23, 2010, 04:05 PM
I think the "ho-hum" guy enjoys a higher profit margin on the $400 guns he sells....YMMV.

On the contrary.... the Sako brings a much higher profit than the $400 stuff!

bhk
August 23, 2010, 06:09 PM
One of the nice things about Sako rifles is that the fine triggers are easy to adjust by the owner. I have one target Sako that the trigger adjusted down to 1 3/4 pounds just fine, and another varmint Sako that has the trigger at 2 pounds. And they are crisp! I have another older Sako that has a trigger that will not adjust down as finely. It is at about 3.5 pounds, which is about perfect for my deer hunting needs anyway.

Big Bill
August 23, 2010, 06:26 PM
One of the finest rifles on earth. I had a Sako 270 back in the 70s and regret having ever sold it.

USSR
August 23, 2010, 06:56 PM
Okay, I'll be the skunk at the love fest. I had an early Sako L61R in .30-06 that I never could get to group good. When I finally placed a gage in the muzzle, it measured .303" instead of .300. Yikes! I promptly got rid of it and bought an older Winchester M70 in .30-06 that measured .300" at the muzzle. In fairness to the Sako, I had bought it used and had no idea as to it's history.

Don

VAhuntr
August 23, 2010, 09:20 PM
I know the Sako A7 is not the same as the TRG but they can be had for less than $600 on gunbroker in 270/30-06. I almost picked one up but did not want/need another 270 or 06.

HOOfan_1
August 24, 2010, 12:05 AM
My old Sako AV and new Tikka T3 are each in another league in terms of accuracy and fit/finish.

Fit and Finnish :D

Seems to me when many people want to build an extremely high priced custom sporting rifle, they go with a Sako action.

From the ones I have seen, they are very good looking guns, but I like the looks of the Weatherby Mark V Deluxe better, but have always thought the Sako was held in higher regard.

Bluenote
August 24, 2010, 09:15 AM
I'm known by my friends as rather a blot rifle 'whore' , I go through bolt rifles like some folks go through shorts and socks , I get rid of them if they don't perform. And one that has remained for twenty-five plus years is an olf Sako 75 in .257 roberts , still shooting under ( well under) a minute of angle and has taken black bear , elk , moose , antelope , hogs and countless deer of various sorts along with varmints and predators , still goes along on varmint shoots just in case of the wind coming up. It has performed comsistently as well or better than some rifles I've owned that I've had five times the money invested into.

YMMV...........

mes228
August 24, 2010, 01:16 PM
I really like Sako and they are accurate fine rifles. The only negative that I personally have experienced is they can be somewhat hard to sell. For a keeper that's no big deal. However, I sell and trade quite a bit and Sakos can hang around a Looooooong time.

HKGuns
August 24, 2010, 08:18 PM
Ok, Uncle Mike, what do you think of this one?

1970 Finnbear in 30-06, unfired, the metal finish is 100% as far as I can tell, there are some light safe marks on the stock in a couple of places. The bore is 100% unfired. The bolt looks brand new as you can see in the picture and the serial number matches the rifle. Hard to believe this sat in a safe for 40 years and was never fired.

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s8/v11/p279662234-5.jpg

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s5/v4/p432036979-5.jpg

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s10/v18/p622686911-5.jpg

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s10/v18/p742977374-5.jpg

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s8/v11/p622261327-5.jpg

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s6/v5/p806906100-5.jpg

redarmy67
August 24, 2010, 08:48 PM
I own a sako .308 It was given to me as a gift from my uncle. He bought it in the late 70's and it is in mint condition. He gave me my choice between the .308 and a .243 sako. I have had it about 15 years. I have never killed anything with it but my father and brother both have knocked down several deer with it.

BudW
August 24, 2010, 08:57 PM
2nd to none

Uncle Mike
August 24, 2010, 11:57 PM
Sweet rifle HK....back when real rifles were made!

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