.223, 16", 1:9 - What bullet weight?


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Sgt_R
August 20, 2010, 01:14 PM
Up until recently, Uncle Sam provided all of my ammunition, and I didn't have to worry about such things as bullet weight, boat tail, or any of that nonsense. I just used what I was issued.

Now that I have my own AR, I have to buy my own ammunition. I know that I'm probably safe with 55gr FMJ, but what else can I reliably and accurately feed my new toy?

Thanks,
R

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rcmodel
August 20, 2010, 01:23 PM
Any weight you want to use, from 36 grain Varmint Grenades up to probably 77 grain Match Kings.

Every rifle is a rule unto itself however, so you just need to try various bullet weights and see what yours prefers.

rc

valorius
August 20, 2010, 01:25 PM
My 1:9/16" shoots Nosler 77gr OTM bullets very nicely.

Sgt_R
August 20, 2010, 01:27 PM
Well, that simplifies things. Thanks fellas.

R

benEzra
August 20, 2010, 02:07 PM
First, check to see if your rifle is marked .223 or 5.56mm (unless it's a Ruger mini-14, which are commonly marked .223 but have 5.56mm chambers). If it's 5.56mm, you can shoot any 5.56x45mm NATO or .223; if it's marked .223, you should stick with .223 Remington.

1:9 is an approximation; some are a little closer to 1:8 and some may be closer to 1:10. If your rifle is toward the slower end of the twist rate scale, you may find that anything heavier than about 69gr isn't sufficiently stabilized (e.g., if you get lousy accuracy with 77's, go lighter). As far as the lightweights, anything down to the 40gr JHP's should also work fine.

Basically, try different loads---none of them will hurt your rifle---and see what your rifle likes.

MinnMooney
August 20, 2010, 02:14 PM
1:9" twist is meant for UP TO 66 grain pills. All mfg'rs recomment 1:7" or 1:8" rates of twist for the 77 & 80 grain bullets.

Stay with the faster burning powders for the short 16" barrel otherwise you're wasting the energy of some of the powder that is still burning AFTER it leaves the barrel.

rcmodel
August 20, 2010, 02:30 PM
Whatever powder gives the highest velocity in a long barrel will also give the highest velocity in a shorter one.

Anyway, unless Sgt R is a reloader, he will have to use whatever powder the factory puts in there.
And none of us have any way of knowing what that is.

rc

Sgt_R
August 20, 2010, 02:42 PM
First, check to see if your rifle is marked .223 or 5.56mm...

S&W M&P 15 MOE. Their website says 5.56mm, but I'll double check the weapon itself when I get home from work.

Anyway, unless Sgt R is a reloader...

Someday I'll have enough property to shoot on, and enough room in my basement for a nice reloading bench. These days, living in a condo, not so much. ;)

Thanks again,
R

rcmodel
August 20, 2010, 02:47 PM
S&W M&P 15 MOE is 5.56 NATO chambered.
Don't worry about it.

Look on the barrel for chamber marking stamp.

You won't find any .223 Rem. chambered AR's except in specilized Target or Varmint models, and they will be clearly marked.

rc

highorder
August 20, 2010, 02:54 PM
I shoot 62gr. in my 1in9" AR with very acceptable accuracy.

TonyAngel
August 20, 2010, 03:36 PM
Assuming that you have a 5.56mm chamber, you can shoot anything out of your rifle that is labeled as being .223 or 5.56 as long as they are short enough to go into the magazine.

Of course, how accurately it will shoot the chosen ammo varies from rifle to rifle. If you aren't reloading, the 62gr hollow point from Silver Bear is hard to beat in terms of bang for the buck. They go for just over $100 for 500 rounds.

Al LaVodka
August 21, 2010, 11:08 AM
.
Al

DoubleTapDrew
August 21, 2010, 01:02 PM
If you are going to order some 70+ gr ammo I'd buy a box or two first to make sure they work well in your rifle before springing for a case.
Black hills has some nice 69gr OTM ammo that's not too expensive and should work well in a 1:9

jpwilly
August 21, 2010, 01:15 PM
In my experience with two AR-15 and 1-9" twist. They don't like the 68gr+ pills. Maybe you'll find a heavy bullet that will stabilize maybe you won't. My two are very accurate with 50-62gr stuff.

Zerodefect
August 21, 2010, 05:51 PM
Up until recently, Uncle Sam provided all of my ammunition, and I didn't have to worry about such things as bullet weight, boat tail, or any of that nonsense. I just used what I was issued.

Now that I have my own AR, I have to buy my own ammunition. I know that I'm probably safe with 55gr FMJ, but what else can I reliably and accurately feed my new toy?

Thanks,
R

55-62gn IME.

Where are you shooting in Ohio. We need more black rifles!

If you enjoyed reading about ".223, 16", 1:9 - What bullet weight?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!