357 vs grizzly


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Revolver Ocelot
August 21, 2010, 01:21 AM
I'm about to move to alaska, and am in the process of picking up a 45-70 guide gun for hunting with but should I find myself in a situation with such a predatory animal with for whatever the reason may be my rifle is not of use would a gp100 loaded with 200gr hardcast bullets be enough to stop a grizzly?

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akadave
August 21, 2010, 01:36 AM
Well...on that .357 the key is to file down the front sight. That way, it wont hurt as much when the bear takes the gun away and jams it up your rear end...:p

In all seriousness though. Keep the .357 but get something with more steam when you get here. I think a perfect start to big bore handguns and for bear is a Ruger Super Redhawk in 480 Ruger. I have a friend that loads em up plenty big and hot to do the job if you do yours.

Carne Frio
August 21, 2010, 01:38 AM
A gp100 loaded with 200gr hardcast bullets might stop a grizzly. For me,
the 44 magnum is the minimum cartridge, to use as a backup for any large bears.

Gryffydd
August 21, 2010, 06:28 AM
Short answer:
If your shot is in the right place, the .357 will stop a Grizzly in its tracks.
Good luck getting your shot to land there.
Problem is, if your .454 Casull/500 S&W Mag shot lands in the wrong place, it won't do jack.
The plus side to the larger rounds is that the "right place" is a bit bigger due to increased penetration.
The downside is you're less likely to get more than one shot off in the 2 seconds or so you'll have.

CajunBass
August 21, 2010, 07:17 AM
Let me make sure I have this down right.

You're worried that if your 45/70 RIFLE doesn't stop the bear, you want to know if your .357 handgun will? :confused:

I guess it will work better than speaking sternly to the bear.

Rexster
August 21, 2010, 08:13 AM
Phil Shoemaker, an Alaskan guide, wrote an article in a Wolfe Publications magazine, regarding handguns and bears. I did read this article myself. He uses a .44 mag sixgun in bear country. One of his children uses a .357 K-frame, and the author wrote why he thinks it is adequate. I won't try to put words in his mouth. The articles exists; perhaps someone can quote it, or post a link. To be clear, this author did not promote the .357 as being the best for bear, as some have stated on internet forums.

Based on this real-world advice, I would consider a properly-loaded .357 to be a useful tool, if/when I manage to walk around among big bears, but preferably accompanied by heavier ordnance. It seems the OP plans to have that heavier ordnance.

gun guy
August 21, 2010, 08:28 AM
The only case I know of personally. A friend of mine and his buddy were deer hunting near Juno. The were dressing out their deer when a big hungry griz showed up. Joe had a ruger redhawk in 44 mag with an 8 or 9" bbl, his buddy had a 30/30. They were barely able to stop the bear, with both weapons, working together. So, while a 357 might work, if it's all you have, that choice has been made, but, if you plan to go out, and take a 357 it might not be the best option.
good luck

snooperman
August 21, 2010, 12:00 PM
It got its name because it is known to kill and devour humans. It stands about 9 ft tall when on its hind legs and weighs about 1300 lbs. The grizzly bear is too heavy to escape up a tree like its smaller cousins the brown bear and black bear when threatened, hence it will usually stand its ground and fight it out--Usually with a better outcome. Knowing all of this , I would be very reluctant to enter the territory of "Ursus horrilis" with a 357 magnum. Go with at least a 44 magnum or larger handgun and a short powerful rifle such as 375 or 45X70.

roaddog28
August 21, 2010, 12:10 PM
Having a 357 as your handgun is suicide. You may get lucky and get the perfect shot off but in most cases that is unlikely. Like others said a minium caliber would be a 44 magnum. And I would rather have a .454 Casull/500 S&W and even then the chances of getting off the right shot under pressure is not good. If you don't you will be his supper. Another option to have is a 12 guage with slugs and of course pepper spray for Bears.

All I can say is good luck. You will need it.

roaddog28

KodiakBeer
August 21, 2010, 12:14 PM
The grizzly bear is too heavy to escape up a tree like its smaller cousins the brown bear and black bear when threatened

Actually, Alaskan brown bears are easily twice the size of a grizzly, and can stand over 12 feet on their hind legs (the hide can square over 10 feet).

A .357 is not a good choice, but might serve with perfect shot placement - straight through the nose or mouth.

wow6599
August 21, 2010, 12:20 PM
Are we going to be invaded by an army of grizzly bears in the near future?
Soooo many threads about bears recently.......

CraigC
August 21, 2010, 12:21 PM
If all you have is a .357, a good 200gr LBT is your best choice......in that chambering. Forget about anything lighter and faster.


It got its name because it is known to kill and devour humans.
Not true.

"The word "grizzly" in its name refers to "grizzled" or grey hairs in its fur, but when naturalist George Ord formally named the bear in 1815, he misunderstood the word as "grisly", to produce its biological Latin specific or subspecific name "horribilis"."

snooperman
August 21, 2010, 12:24 PM
However , these large bears are too large and can not pull themselves up a tree. Their leg and shoulder muscles are not strong enough to do it according to my book on North american animals. Since he did not mention the Alaskan brown bear or the great big Russian brown bear I did not consider it as part of the discussion. "nuff said"

batmann
August 21, 2010, 12:35 PM
A--I don't live in Bear country so I will pass on the .357 side arm debate as I don't feel qualified. That said, most perople with REAL knowledge (I am not one) go with a caliber that starts with 4, as in .44M, 454C or hot .45 Colt.
One other item most experts agree on is a good Bear spray. Again,I am not an expert and I am only passing along info from other similar questions from other forums, take it as you will.

Long Tom Coffin
August 21, 2010, 12:42 PM
Full size Grizzly + .357 of any type = Grizzly FTW.

An old barber shop buddy of mine lived in the hinterlands of Alaska where grizzlies were a regular occurance. A Marlin 1895GBL in 45/70 was his standard weapon of choice (as a matter of fact, when he moved back here he bequeathed his well used and very customized Marlin to me, citing his hunting days as over due to old age. His rotator cuff couldn't take it anymore :) ) but he states on the rare instances he was not able to tote his rifle around he wouldn't carry anything less that a .454. Ruger has some very affordable models in that caliber.

snooperman
August 21, 2010, 12:50 PM
are all brown bears and all of the same species. They vary in size due to location and the diet in that habitat. This includes the Alaskan brown bear.

snooperman
August 21, 2010, 12:55 PM
its Latin biological name meaning "horrible bear". I am aware of its grizzly coated fur as to its "common name" referring to its appearance.

mjyeagle
August 21, 2010, 12:56 PM
357 is powerful but not grizz powerful the minimum i would carry is fullhouse 45colt ruger loads with heave hardcast bullets but i still think this is underpowered for grizz better to be safe then sorry

Wishoot
August 21, 2010, 01:06 PM
Good Gravy! How many ***^*^&## bear posts are enough? I think questions about bear defense outnumber questions about Glock's reliability.

CraigC
August 21, 2010, 01:18 PM
CraigC , I was referring to the name "Ursus horribilis"...
its Latin biological name meaning "horrible bear". I am aware of its grizzly coated fur as to its "common name" referring to its appearance.
And I was stating that it was not intentionally named "horrible bear", it was a misunderstanding of the term grizzly vs. grisly.

susquehannaslim
August 21, 2010, 01:28 PM
If it were me ,I wouldnt carry anything less than a 338 Win Mag ! JMO

Wolfeye
August 21, 2010, 02:02 PM
Revolver Ocelot,

I assume you're describing a situation where your rifle isn't in your hands / has jammed / etc., but your sidearm is still available. If .357 magnum is the largest caliber you shoot well with, and you're really fast at getting a shot off in multiple body positions & terrain, then .357 magnum is what you should carry. I'd want one with at least a 4" barrel.

I don't live in Alaska any more, but most people carried .44 magnum revolvers as their sidearm. As a hiker who still vacations up there once a year, I pack a .38 special pocket gun & bear spray. The handgun isn't for bear. I act a little like I'm hunting while hiking; I figure staying alert, sticking with a group of people, and keeping food out of camp probably protect people more than big guns do.

22-rimfire
August 21, 2010, 02:37 PM
Avoidance is a good thing with big bears. Bear spray works. Bullets work but may not work fast enough. Let us know how you do after your first encounter with your 357 mag. :D

duns
August 21, 2010, 02:55 PM
To those who said we've had enough bear posts, no one is forcing you to play.

I don't know about the OP but I was wondering about the same question and I felt a bit disappointed by the answers so far, where the prevailing opinion is 357 mag is not enough but fails to make a specific recommendation. The OP already has a 45-70 rifle and is looking for some clear advice on the best handgun should his rifle not be usable for any reason.

joe_security
August 21, 2010, 03:18 PM
What about the Ruger Alaskan ? 454/.45 Colt. ? As much as I like the .357, when Alaska is the state I am thinking bigger is better. The OP is talking a 45/70 rifle so why not a large bore revolver on the hip ? If the OP is set on the .357 should we be making an ammo recommendation ?

Rexster
August 21, 2010, 03:21 PM
The advisability of a .357 is also going to depend on how one chooses to use it. I can virtually always have an SP101 with me here in Texas, along with another handgun. If I suddenly found myself invited to Alaska, upon reaching the wild country, I would swap the antipersonnel ammo for hardcast hunting loads, which I have indeed tried and found controllable. A small DA sixgun that can be inside my sleeping bag surely beats no handgun at all if I can't reach my Winchester Model 70 Safari Express at a given moment in time. I reckon it would be nice to have my Ruger Bisley loaded with hot .45 Colt ammo, too.

I have never walked among large bears, but hunt people for a living, wear a badge, and will usually have two handguns and a shotgun on duty, so the principle is the same. If an underpowered handgun is the best one has at the moment, use it in nasal spray mode, whether the opponent is human or ursine.

Edited to add: I really do want one of those Ruger SRH Alaskans in .45 Colt/.454 Casull, when money in my pocket coincides with availability of the sixgun.

Surefire
August 21, 2010, 03:35 PM
.357 IMO is a MININUM for a SMALL black bear. And only then if you don't have a rifle on you.

If we are talking grizzly (especially the larger Kodiaks), only a rifle round larger than .30-06 should be considered as primary defense. The minimum backup pistol for grizzley, IMO, that most people can control is a .44 magnum loaded with as heavy bullets as possible. The .454 Casull is a better backup, as are the .500 magnums, but recoil starts becoming a factor (at least for me) with the .454 Casull and higher.

To me the .44 magnum, as a BACKUP only, makes the most sense. For many shooters it offers the best combo of controllability and power.

sonier
August 21, 2010, 03:48 PM
real simple, the 357 magnum when it was the strongest handgun in its day took down many grizzlys. its just not the ideal choice anymore. Oh and for black bear a 357 magnum wont think twice on putting it down. Black bears just dont get big and scary as people think. Think of a hog yes your normal butcher pig the breeding boars can get over 500 pounds and a .22lr can kill them. black bears dont get much bigger than 500 pounds. Bears arnt surrounded by reactive armor or depleted uranium. 357 magnum is probally the best carry choice there is for black bear. And It does have the potential to stop a grizzly bear it has done it many times in history.

Unless surefire from florida has seen many of those mythical 1000 pound balck bears down there i wouldnt worry.

popbang
August 21, 2010, 09:14 PM
You have a 45-70, so the 357 would be your back-up. Well, to me I would rather have the 357 then no back-up. A 200 grain hard cast bullet is nothing to sneeze at.

Is it ideal? No, but if it is what you have then you use. I lived in Fairbank 6 years and Anchorage another 5 years. I went hunting quite a bit out of Valdez along the coast. I carried a 45-70, and most of the time I didn't take a back-up gun with me. That gun went everywhere with me. Guess I was foolish, but I never got ate.

If you are looking for suggestions of what to take I would say 44 Mag or more.

KodiakBeer
August 21, 2010, 09:24 PM
Actually, I'm real fond of the Guide Gun as a carry gun for fishing trips and what have you, but it's not a great hunting rifle because it lacks range.
You might want to consider buying a good 30.06 and forget the handguns.

sonier
August 21, 2010, 11:08 PM
get a good autoloader 30/06 :)

CHEVELLE427
August 21, 2010, 11:27 PM
my dad hunted Alaska many years ago , and there was a story about a bear that killed a ranger, when they killed the bear they found some of the ranger and 6 357 mag rounds in the bear. JUST AN FYI

Cocked & Locked
August 21, 2010, 11:28 PM
I love bear threads



minimum
http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6259637/145236207.jpg

kbbailey
August 22, 2010, 12:11 AM
My thoughts on the .357 mag: $.02 worth.
Bare minimum for whitetail hunting. Been there done that about ten times before I got a .45colt.
However....I'm not gonna carry a .45colt day after day. That is why I bought a sp101 for ccw.
whatever the threat, better to have a small .357 on the hip than a big ol' hogleg back at the house.
IMHO

DenaliPark
August 22, 2010, 12:50 AM
I'm about to move to alaska, and am in the process of picking up a 45-70 guide gun for hunting with but should I find myself in a situation with such a predatory animal with for whatever the reason may be my rifle is not of use would a gp100 loaded with 200gr hardcast bullets be enough to stop a grizzly?
Maybe, maybe not. You may be able to stop a bear with a 328 gr hard cast .44 magnum, then again, you may not! Truth is, if you need the handgun to stop a bruin(black or grizzly)you're likely to have the animal on top of you by the time you get the gun into action. A 200 gr hard cast should have no difficulty penetrating the scull of a grizzly at such close quarters, then again, if you're aim is off it may well not.

Gryffydd
August 22, 2010, 03:53 AM
when they killed the bear they found some of the ranger and 6 357 mag rounds in the bear. JUST AN FYI
This tells us nothing. For all we know all 6 rounds hit the bear in non-vital areas and a 44 mag would have done no better.

ArchAngelCD
August 22, 2010, 05:34 AM
To those who said we've had enough bear posts, no one is forcing you to play.

I don't know about the OP but I was wondering about the same question and I felt a bit disappointed by the answers so far, where the prevailing opinion is 357 mag is not enough but fails to make a specific recommendation. The OP already has a 45-70 rifle and is looking for some clear advice on the best handgun should his rifle not be usable for any reason.
duns,
No need to get upset or anything else you were thinking of at the time. I just did a quick search of only this section of the forum and used the words "bear protection" the the search yielded SEVEN PAGES of threads. This has been done over and over again with the last thread only a week or so old and the last post in that thread was made yesterday. It's still on the first page of the forum for goodness sakes. So, no reason to chastise me or anyone else for saying, "another bear thread."

So sorry you are disappointed in our, or should I say my answer... :rolleyes:

R.Clem
August 22, 2010, 01:02 PM
I know a fellow in Talkeetna, AK who used to carry a .357 while fishing. He had a confrontation with a bear and managed to come out on top. He shot the bear 6 times and had to run and dodge while he reloaded and then shot the bear 4 more times before it collapsed from the shots. The bear was never more than 20 feet away. The load was 8 grains of Unique under a 160 grain hard cast (Linotype) bullet. The bear died less than 6 feet from his feet.
This fellow now carries a .454 Casull with hard cast a 330 grain slug.
His .357 is now for plinking only.
I really like the .357, I have 2, but for even black bear, I don't see them as adequate.

Ray

CHEVELLE427
August 22, 2010, 01:13 PM
This tells us nothing. For all we know all 6 rounds hit the bear in non-vital areas and a 44 mag would have done no better.

tells me would of should of could of,

357 didn't work .

one would also think a ranger in the wilderness might be able to shoot what he aims at,:rolleyes:

I'm sure if we search we can find some larger guns have failed to kill bears as well. but the ??? was is a 357 good enough. again might ,might not be good enough.

have heard of bears killed with a BOW AND ARROW so who knows just what is the ideal bear gun ;)

Deltaboy
August 22, 2010, 03:59 PM
IT will work but I would want a 44!

http://www.leverguns.com/articles/taylor/357magnum.htm

6-gunfun
August 22, 2010, 04:17 PM
i dont live (or even hunt for that matter) in bear country so take this as you will.my uncle went black bear hunting in michigan. one day he got put up a tree by a female black bear she followed right up after him and he unloaded his colt .45 sa into her head it didnt fase her it took another 6 bullets to kill her after making sure she was dead they checked and she had 10 holes in her out of 12.....so you tell me is a .357 enough?

fourdollarbill
August 22, 2010, 04:41 PM
I'm a big 357mag fan and I have read near 10 threads on this subject. At first I found myself wanting to defend the 357 mag vs bear. After a few threads I realized that if I was moving into bear country I would ask the locals including the rangers what the best line of defense is. Similar to a fishing trip in another state in a type of water you never fished before. Do you take the bait that you like best or do you stop at the local tackle shop near the new fishing place and ask for the best bait?
If I asked my neighbor for the best bait to take to the Niagra River for Browns he would say "worms and a Zebco 202 is all you'll ever need"

Cosmoline
August 22, 2010, 05:08 PM
The grizzly bear is too heavy to escape up a tree like its smaller cousins the brown bear and black bear when threatened, hence it will usually stand its ground and fight it out

?? The "griz", ursus arctos horribilis, is just the inland variation of the coastal brown bear. It's *SMALLER*, not larger, and has a reputation for being more aggressive and meaner than the larger coastal brown bears. It's a well-earned reputation. Probably because of the diet of roots and angry squirrels instead of gourmet salmon feasts. Most encounters in SE and SC AK are with small black bear, which are almost always harmless and NOT appropriate to shoot in DLP. Second most frequent encounters are coastal brown bears while you're both salmon fishing. Again these are almost always not encounters where you need to shoot. The exception is if you're being charged at close quarters by a brown bear sow protecting cubs. Most maulings are the result of precisely that encounter. Run-ins with grizzly bears in the interior is less common because they're spread out more and there are far fewer people around. They can lead to dicey situations and there have been some very brutal maulings that cross the line into predation. But that's not an everyday issue for most folks.

Given that background and the typical lay of the land, your biggest defensive weapon is your ears and what's between them. Don't go in guns blasting every time you see some bear. But if you DO have to use a weapon DLP it's liable to be an unexpected and fast encounter. So whatever you carry, make sure you're very familiar with it and a very good shot with it. If you're far better and more practiced with a .357 than a .454 Casull, bring the .357 over the Casull. A .357 180 or 200 grain hardcast might be enough if loaded hot, drawn fast and fired square, but a .454 you miss or hit poorly with won't be. Though of course bring the long gun over both--if possible.

snooperman
August 22, 2010, 06:18 PM
able to climb trees is true and I was referring to his smaller cousins in the lower 48 that can climb trees to escape. It is obvious that the Alaskan brown bears are all of the same species and what makes one larger is their diet. Most of the information that I gave came from a book on North American big game animals. There is much misinformation about Grizzlies. The fact that they can sprint 33 miles/ hour up a hill leaves little chance for a human to "just leave" and things will be O.K. shows a lack of understanding about the behavior of this animal. I Stand by what I wrote earlier and taken from my book. Also , the Russian brown bear is a member of this specie along with the Alaskan Kodiak bear that lives on the island and is isolated . These animals migrated to this continent when the mongoloid migration took place about 12,000 years ago , and came from Russia. The largest Bear on our continent IS NOT the Alaskan brown bear that lives on the coast as has been misstated on this thread, it is the N.A Polar bear according to my book.My 2 cents.

KodiakBeer
August 22, 2010, 06:48 PM
It's debatable whether the brown or polar bear are the largest bear. If you go by length or hide measurement, then it's the polar bear. If you go by weight, then it would be the brown bear.
Polar bears are lanky, while browns can be hawgs, especially in the fall.

The "brown bears" in the lower 48 are black bears and should properly be called cinnamon bears. A completely different animal. There are also blue and white black bears (google Kermodes bear and glacier bear), but they're all "black bears".

Cosmoline
August 22, 2010, 07:53 PM
The fact that they can sprint 33 miles/ hour up a hill leaves little chance for a human to "just leave" and things will be O.K. shows a lack of understanding about the behavior of this animal.

Of course you can just leave. That's the standard practice in fact for both humans and bears. Otherwise there would be a dozen maulings a day here.

Deaf Smith
August 22, 2010, 11:35 PM
Ocelot,

Since you will have a .45/70 keep it handy at all times.

The .357 magnum, stuck in a Bear's mouth, eye, or ear, should do the trick.

But keep that .45/70 handy!

Deaf

R.Clem
August 23, 2010, 12:06 AM
The "brown bears" in the lower 48 are black bears and should properly be called cinnamon bears. A completely different animal. There are also blue and white black bears (google Kermodes bear and glacier bear), but they're all "black bears".
A few years ago that statement was true, then along came the U.S. Department of Fish & Wildlife with their "great idea" to repopulate the western states where brown bear used to roam. Now we have the hump back "cinnamon" bear, the locals here refer to them as grizzlies as they are from B.C. Canada, I would imagine they are correct. We also have black bear in many diffrent shades, black, brown, and cinnamon, with some even multi colored.

Ray

snooperman
August 23, 2010, 08:45 AM
Alaskan "brown" bears are not all " brown" either as it wanders from place to place in search of food in different habitats it eats different food at different times of the year and the coat color changes from light brown to dark brown to gray in color. The same is true for the bears in the lower 48 as well. I have seen black beers on my farm at different times of the year with a brown coat color.

LeonCarr
August 23, 2010, 09:58 AM
I wish I was moving to Alaska. It would give me a reason to buy a .375 H&H. I would use one of those or a shotgun loaded with slugs.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Ronsch
August 23, 2010, 01:24 PM
I live down in Juneau (not Juno) and when I go woods walking (and not hunting...totally different scenario), I carry a shotgun loaded with slugs.

KodiakBeer
August 23, 2010, 03:45 PM
The color of their coat is determined by their diet.

Diet has nothing to do with it. They're just born a particular color phase and that's their color for life. Bears have a winter coat and a summer coat and so their color may change a bit over the year.

AKPastor
August 23, 2010, 04:15 PM
I live in the interior of AK and we have blacks and browns. Black bear can be quite dangerous enough, but the browns are powerhouses.

Some have noted that they can get too big to climb trees - well if you are in the interior, there are few trees thick enough that a brown couldn't push it over - or tall enough to get out of his reach easily.

That said, I prefer .45 acp with military hardball ammo. The penetration is reportedly great on a black bear - and quite decent on a brown - but I have not had to try my hand at it and hope to God I never do.

As one post said - the best thing is to remain alert, make lots of noise, and keep your long gun handy. Most of the time, bears are rather shy and stay away from noise.

As to bear spray - my thoughts are that it just gives the person using it a bit of a Mexican spicy flavor for when the bear starts to eat

CoastieShep
August 23, 2010, 04:22 PM
Best bear gun is a .22 pistol. Shoot your buddy in the knee and run like the wind.
A .357 will stop a bear every single time.........you shoot him in the eye, going into his brain.

Deaf Smith
August 23, 2010, 08:21 PM
http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6259637/145236207.jpg

Ahhhhhh!!!

Don't show me pictures like this!! Makes me want one!

Deaf

wesessiah
August 23, 2010, 10:57 PM
i like when threads like this end up turning into semantics arguing, ignoring clarification posts in regards to what one meant, and who's the best biologist when it comes to nomenclature...

i personally agree with those who say .44 or larger. if you have the option of being more secure with a larger round, why take the chance with less firepower?

Mr. T
August 24, 2010, 01:55 AM
A .357Mag will shoot through an engine block; are you really trying to say that if all you had for a back up gun was a .357Mag, you wouldn't recommend using it. With 200 grain hot loads and a 6" barrel, it would be the very minimum caliber you could use. As others have said other calibers would be more effective. I know an old man that used to live up there and one of his friends was mauled pretty bad by a Grizzly. His friend emptied a full magazine from a 30.06 with 220 grain loads and the bear still got to him. In that case I don't care if you had a S&W .500 it wouldn't do [much good]. A lot of encounters depends on the "individual" and by that I mean the bear and the person behind the gun. My friend said that the best weapon he would recommend would be a 12 gauge shotgun loaded with foster slugs. He said that it's devastating; he said that one guy killed a bear at point blank range with Goose Loads. The bear had the guy by surprise and the guy only had time to turn and the barrel of the gun went right under the chin of the bear right before he pulled the trigger. He said the bears momentum knocked the guy down, but the bear was toast. The guy ended up with a broken collar bone and a broken pelvis. Not exactly ideal, but better than being eaten alive I guess. All this being said go with a shotgun and keep it close by otherwise go with the biggest handgun you can manage. :)

hso
August 24, 2010, 11:27 AM
Folks,

Debate on what is and isn't a the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and what are and are not the characteristics are generally out of scope for THR's Revolver forum (and probably out of scope for THR as a whole) unless you're focusing on how easy or difficult it is to achieve adequate penetration or delivered energy to the target. It is also a sidebar on the OP's topic and should be carried out by PMs to avoid hijacking the thread.

wow6599
August 24, 2010, 11:36 AM
A .357Mag will shoot through an engine block
No it won't

hso
August 24, 2010, 04:20 PM
A .357Mag will shoot through an engine block;

We'll assume that is just hyperbole and that no one is expected to take it literally as fact.

John Wayne
August 24, 2010, 04:40 PM
A .357Mag will shoot through an engine block

Yeah, and a .30-30 will also shoot through a bank vault door. When did Teddy Kennedy start posting on this forum?

-----------

Now that I think about it, I see no reason why a .357 loaded with hard cast or FMJ bullets couldn't shoot clean through a 15cc weedeater engine.

wow6599
August 24, 2010, 05:12 PM
A .357Mag will shoot through an engine block;

We'll assume that is just hyperbole and that no one is expected to take it literally as fact.
hso, you would be surprised at all gun owners I know, some ex-military, who really think a .357 Mag will go through an engine block. My father-in-law is one of them; he ran an armory in the National Guard for close to 10 years.

Art Eatman
August 24, 2010, 06:40 PM
Folks, I'm sorry, but I see very little socially redeeming material in worrying about engine blocks.

Besides which, they ain't furry...

Enough. Find a .357. Find a bear. Deal with it, and report back.

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