[recoil] Spring Wars


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gofastman
August 24, 2010, 01:51 PM
this is a cut and paste from http://www.custom-glock.com/springtech.html:
Effects of a lighter spring:

Recoil is transferred to the shooter in a shorter duration of time because the slide is moving at a higher velocity. This is often perceived as less recoil and reduced muzzle flip.

With a lighter spring the shooter also has less force to counteract, or you don’t have to work as hard. This usually reduces muzzle flip.

Less force to counteract reduces the odds of producing a limp wrist style jam.

A lighter spring will result is reduced muzzle dip when the slide closes keeping sights steadier and on target for a faster follow-up shot.

Light springs are particularly helpful to smaller shooters like children, women or anyone else having trouble keeping their wrists locked.


Effects of a Heavier spring:
Recoil is transferred to the shooter over a longer duration of time due to lower slide velocities.

Slower slides equal a longer recovery time for the shooter.

The shooter does more work, as there is more force to counteract. This often causes and increase in muzzle flip.

The chances of a limp wrist style jam are increased, as there is more force working to unlock your wrists.

The chance of the slide short stroking and causing a feed jam is increased.

Increased muzzle dip when the slide closes for a slower follow-up shot.

I have found that I have had almost a polar opposite result from this, at least in my Glock 20SF. I have tried a 13lb, stock 17lb, and 22lb spring, the 22lb is just better for me, especially in regard to the part about recoil being transfered over a longer period of time,the 22lb spring makes it feel much more revolver-like.

I do agree with the part of the limp-wrist style jam increasing though, although I can only get it to happen if I intentionally try with the .40S&W barrel.

What are your thoughts and experiences?

"LEAVE IT STOCK" style comments not welcome here

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rcmodel
August 24, 2010, 03:28 PM
They left out the part about increased frame battering with too light a spring, or a worn out spring.

Maybe it won't hurt a Glock, but it certainly is not good for a steel or alloy frame gun.

rc

pvthouse
August 24, 2010, 08:32 PM
Well whatever works for you just works. I have tried the same thing in my G21 with the opposite effects. I noticed a marginal difference in my follow-up shot time on the negative side of the track. So I reverted it back to the stock spring. You shouldn't try to silence a group of people with a certain opinion just because it doesn't jive with what you think. If it worked for you then great. Didn't work for me and I did about the same thing. And the whole not welcome thing doesn't work in any forum let alone an online one. If you want people to have only your opinions and views maybe you should start your own religion and leave forums alone since they are ment for open mindedness and a sharing of ideas and input.

Zerodefect
August 24, 2010, 09:15 PM
I've tried many recoil springs in my Glock 23. Most were pure @#%^.

My Glock is extremely custom tuned, except my recoil spring. Keep the stock spring.

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