Tubular vs. clip magazine!


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liikeaboss
August 25, 2010, 12:14 AM
So I'm in the market for a .22 carbine. I'm looking into the marlin line atm, my only question is what do you prefer? a clip magazine, or a tube fed system? Why?

Thanks guys!!

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icebones
August 25, 2010, 12:20 AM
40 smacks with a wet noodle for calling it a clip:D

But seriously man, they both have their pros and cons.

Magazines are faster to reload and you can buy larger capacity aftermarket mags, but they cost money, and they can wear out/get lost.

Tubular slower to reload, permanently attached to the rifle somewhat (the spring tube has to be removed partially to reload and it can be lost or damaged)

Your best bet would be to find someone that owns both a magazine fed (Ruger 10/22) and a tube fed (Marlin model 60) or go to a gun store. see what you like best.

I own both a Ruger 10/22 and a marlin model 60. I like shooting both, but with a 50 round mag the 10/22 is hard to beat for plinking and fun, but I take my marlin out squirrel and rabbit hunting a lot more i just like the look and balance of the marlin.

liikeaboss
August 25, 2010, 12:22 AM
Thanks icebones! The funny part is that I copy / pasted "clip magazine" off the Marlin website lol!

liikeaboss
August 25, 2010, 12:23 AM
another question is, is there a markable difference in wear and tear / reliability from one system to the next?

HOOfan_1
August 25, 2010, 12:24 AM
For me I only want a tube on a lever gun....mostly for the look and the only clip fed lever guns just look weird to me. (Savage 99 excluded).

Also when loading a tube gun can be a bit tricky sometimes. Have to have the gun tilting muzzle up. Sometimes it can be tricky to get the rounds in just right with cold or gloved hands. They are faster to unload, but it is easier to lose rounds that way unless you have something to dump them into.

I am not a fan of the clips that stick way below the furniture though....I much prefer the flush fitting Ruger style clips.

Art Eatman
August 25, 2010, 12:24 AM
I've used both. No great preference either way, I guess the main benefit of the tube mag is that when carrying at the balance point, your sweaty little hand isn't against any metal. A tad smoother and more comfortable...

From the FWIW bin: My grandfather referred to the "clip" for his .22 rifle. I first heard him say that back around 1940. The Lord only knows when he first heard that gizmo named "clip". I'm singularly under-whelmed by the emotion in the yip-yap about "clip" vs. "magazine".

I mean, really! Sumdood says "magazine" and you don't know if he's loading or reading. :D

fireman 9731
August 25, 2010, 12:28 AM
Tube magazines all the way.

Much more reliable, slower, but not a pain to load. You can even get speed loaders for them if you really want.

The magazine is the weak link in almost any gun. Make one out of plastic or flimsy metal and it only multiplies the problem.

A tube mag minimizes magazine related malfunctions.

bigfatdave
August 25, 2010, 07:35 AM
The magazine is the weak link in almost any gun.which is a good reason to have a few of them, rather than one that can't be swapped on the fly

oldfool
August 25, 2010, 07:55 AM
I prefer 'clips', but own mostly 'tubes'
go figger

at the bench, a clip (box) magazine is handier
hunting afield, tube magazine is 'better' ("load once, shoot all day")

PS
I never could get real excited, either, about how labeled the 'thang' that holds them extra 'boolits"
1st gun I ever owned was a bolt action 20 gauge, with a two shell (you guessed it) "clip"
have since owned many handguns and rifles that use "mags", and I keep a few spares on hand.. but own no spare tubes

Old Shooter
August 25, 2010, 07:56 AM
I'e had both tube and magazine fed and can't really place one over the other for my preference. Mags are nice as easier to reload and you can keep an extra one or two in your pocket, no problem.

Tubes to me look nicer, generally hold more rounds than factory mags although aftermarket mags will beat them for capacity.

What's your planned use for the gun? Lots of blasting at targets, tin cans, etc I'd probably lean slightly towards the mags fed. For a woods gun, small game hunting or just not going thru a brick of ammo at a session it would be the tube fed.

oldfool
August 25, 2010, 08:03 AM
aftermarket mags will beat them for capacity

for autoloader carbines (if a dozen rounds at a time will not suffice), true
never saw hi-cap box magazines for bolt actions & such though.. but then again just never looked, they might do 'em, for all I know... I don't even favor 10 round box mags on 22 rifles, prefer 'flush" myself, 4 or 5 rounds

always thought the Ruger rotary and Browning helix magazines a cool notion, just never owned either

W.E.G.
August 25, 2010, 08:03 AM
magazine

good ones

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/Ruger%2010-22/DSCN3312.jpg

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/rifle%20pics/Ruger%2010-22/tacticalinnovationsmagazines.jpg

oldfool
August 25, 2010, 08:20 AM
^^^^^^^^
looks like a real "stand-up" gun/mag to me ! :D

ForumSurfer
August 25, 2010, 08:49 AM
I prefer tube, but I don't see either option as being superior or faster. Now if you're shooting less than 100 rounds and you have enough magazines, then yeah, mags are faster. But if you're shooting 1000 or more rounds, then you're not noticing a huge speed difference. Cabelas and a few other places sell a speed tube loader that costs less than a good magazine and it greatly decreases load times. If you do any shooting from a table or prone, depending on the magazine you may have issues.

Wolfebyte
August 25, 2010, 09:35 AM
meh... 6 of one, half a dozen of another..

I've had both, basically it's going to come down to what 'You' like..

I've had the 10/22 with the elongated magazine, fun to shoot.. reloading it is what you make of it. About the only thing I didn't like about the large capacity magazine is carrying the thing on the rifle. I would go out in the pasture, cut a cross to the orchard and hunt tree rats.. the 10/22 with a flush mount magazine was great compared to the high capacity magazine digging in my back or side while trying to sling carry..


My Marlin Glenfield Model 60 was a blast to shoot and easy to carry. But as previously stated, easy to load a round in upside down, difficult to load with gloves and you have to be careful with the spring rod so that it doesn't get bent, damaged or sandy (debris) on it..

45Fan
August 25, 2010, 09:47 AM
Tube fed is my prefference, at least for rimfire rifles. They tend to balance better, and less hanging off the rifle to get caught on stuff in the woods. A flush box would be a close second, but then I would have to carry extra ammo in my pocket when hunting, not a big deal, but just loading up 13 rounds in the tube before hitting the woods has always been more than I ever needed for a full bag of squirls.

boricua9mm
August 25, 2010, 09:53 AM
Thanks icebones! The funny part is that I copy / pasted "clip magazine" off the Marlin website lol!

Believe it or not, technically, Marlin's description could be accurate, depending on what you're looking at. I have a Marlin Model 25 that takes a "clip magazine." The magazine has a clip at the rear that is under spring tension. This clip grabs onto a flat extrusion from the receiver in order to lock it into place. Hence, "clip magazine."

NOT my photo:

http://www.ammoclip.com/images/Marlin/marlin_80_22lr_704046_magazine.jpg

shotgunjoel
August 25, 2010, 09:57 AM
I have 2 of each. I bought both of the magazine fed rifles, and inherited the tube fed rifles. I don't hate the tube feed, it is pretty slim and trim on the rifle, but I prefer magazines because when I'm just going out and shooting it goes faster. Also I can stay laying down to reload the magazines better than the tube fed rifles. YMMV

NCsmitty
August 25, 2010, 10:21 AM
I chose the Marlin M60 because it has a good reputation for reliability, and mostly because it has a tube magazine.
I've had 22 RF rifles using clips, and still do, like my Rem 541-T. They work ok, but I prefer the tube mags for fun shooting.



NCsmitty

Dr T
August 25, 2010, 11:21 AM
For me, it boils down to convenience for loading and unloading.

Years ago when we were always carrying a loaded (in the magazine), non-semi-automatic 22 in the pickup for ranch work (snakes, vermin, etc), we used tubular magazines since they held more cartridges. You never worried about unloading the magazine, and never left a loaded round in the chamber).

Times have changed. Now, All guns get loaded when we get to the ranch and get unloaded before we leave the ranch. A clip is much more convenient: Pop out the magazine, clear the action, and you are done.

I do not want a semi-auto rifle with a tube magazine. Besides being cumbersome to unload, I have found that tube magazines are are bit more difficult to unload. After all the cartridges are dumped, a single round may hang up on the loading ramp and you may have to clear the action a couple of times and visually inspect it to make sure it is clear. It makes me nervous.

CZguy
August 25, 2010, 11:46 AM
I like both types.

I refer to magazine fed as just that because I know that my MI Garand is clip fed. But I don't insist that others do the same thing. I guess I feel the same way about the new style of writing without punctuation.

I've never needed more ammo for hunting that a tube fed rifle will carry, so I don't see any advantage to have a couple of spare loaded magazines in you pocket.

I've never found a .22 that I didn't like. ;)

ForumSurfer
August 25, 2010, 12:13 PM
I've never found a .22 that I didn't like.

I can agree with you on that!

Dr T, in your situation I would want a magazine, as well. For me, I don't hunt anymore. So when I unload my rifle, I do so with my trigger finger once more before heading home.

JohnBT
August 25, 2010, 02:36 PM
I have always found it faster to drop rounds into a tube instead of having to shove them into a magazine one at a time with my thumb. They really go into the tube fast if you pull the rod out and drop the rounds into the open end.

And mags clip into the rifle, so that makes them clips. A magazine is where they store powder isn't it? :)

MinnMooney
August 25, 2010, 02:55 PM
Marlin is has one of the best removable clips[sic] (magazines) on the market. It's their rotory magazine and it is slick and dependable.

TonyAngel
August 25, 2010, 02:57 PM
For carrying around, I don't like the long mags sticking out of the bottom of the rifle. For this reason I like either a tube fed or a Ruger 10/22 with the stock mags. The Ruger mags are on the small side and it's no big deal to throw 5 or 10 of them into the ammo bag, already loaded up.

The only thing is that the 10/22s are built cheap these days. I went to Academy not too long ago to pick one up for my son and would up getting a Henry lever action. The Ruger didn't impress me at all. The finish on the barrel looked more like paint than bluing and there were plastic parts on it. My personal 10/22 is about 15 years old and is a nice rifle.

stchman
August 25, 2010, 03:09 PM
I think the proper term is box magazine. Box magazines are either fixed or removable.

Most shotguns and some .22 rifles use a tube magazine.

Could somebody else who is ultra knowledgeable about magazine terminology please list them.

As far as tube mag or box mag for a .22 rifle. I have owned both the Marlin Model 60 (tube) and the Ruger 10/22 (box) and prefer the box magazine.

While the tube is easy to load there is no room for expansion and if the tube gets bent repair is difficult and costly. If one of my 25 round Butler Creek 10/22 mags goes bad, oh well I have 4 more.

When I go .22 shooting at the range I usually load of all of my 10/22 mags.

Uncle Mike
August 25, 2010, 03:19 PM
I'm singularly under-whelmed by the emotion in the yip-yap about "clip" vs. "magazine".

Seriously....sounds like a bunch of old wo**am bickering! Who cares what you call it....mag, clip, magazine, ammunition feeding device...?

at the bench, a clip (box) magazine is handier
hunting afield, tube magazine is 'better' ("load once, shoot all day")

I tend to think this way, but whatever....I hate to poke around the woods with a 10" long mag, clip, magazine, ammunition feeding device hanging from under the rifle! hehehehe

ForumSurfer
August 25, 2010, 03:45 PM
if the tube gets bent repair is difficult and costly

My mechanical skills are pretty lacking. I can still manage to change one with a hammer, a $10 punch set and a $17 tube from brownells.

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/sid=285/schematicsdetail/60

I found that exploded diagram after I lost #59 during a routine cleaning. I guess the screw is hanging out with a few ar springs and some lost socks.

Runningman
August 25, 2010, 06:43 PM
Kind of depends on what I'm doing with the rifle. I prefer magazine feed rimfire guns for hunting and benchrest work. Especially Ruger rotary type magazines.

Some states don't allow loaded rifles in vehicles for hunting. When your driving to different hunting areas, tube magazines can get annoying loading and unloading frequently. More than a few Grouse hunters, Varmint hunters know this drill. :) Easier and faster just to pop a magazine in and out.

For just general plinking or a general farm use 22. Tubular magazines work excellent.

CZguy
August 25, 2010, 07:02 PM
The Ruger mags are on the small side and it's no big deal to throw 5 or 10 of them into the ammo bag, already loaded up.

I guess it depends on how much disposable cash you have. At around $15.00 each $75.00 to $150.00 to carry .22 ammo is on the high side for me.

I'm pretty happy if I have a spare magazine. (read clip if you wish)

HOWARD J
August 25, 2010, 11:13 PM
If I am shooting at the state range--I am limited to 1 or 6 rds. depending on the range rules. In this case I like the mag like a 10/22 on the shooting bench.
If I am plinking or hunting I like the tube loader like my Marlin 60
Whatever floats your boat...............

icebones
September 4, 2010, 12:36 AM
One advantage of a tube magazine is now ya got "that damned yankee rifle you load on sunday and shoot all week":D

Norrick
September 4, 2010, 02:18 AM
I bought a marlin 60 thinking to myself that there were no magazines to lose or break.

After the first day at the range I knew I had made a mistake. Especially for a semi automatic, it really is a pain to constantly pull out the brass insert, reload, and put the insert back in. Not to mention you can still ding the tube, which could make it not function at all.

If they made tube loading magazines for 22's that had a SIDE LOADING GATE like a Winchester 1892, it would be a deal breaker for me. Just top it off as you wish. I don't know if there are design constraints or if theres just no market for it but I don't believe there are any out there, except for a early 1900's model which I forget the name of.

I think for a bolt action, it would be ok, assuming you took your time between shots, the loading wouldn't be unbearable.

Also, Browning has a rear loading tubed-magazine semi automatic. It looks interesting but I haven't seen in detail how it works. I think there is still an insert you have to remove, but the bullets literally feed through the side of the buttstock, if you hate turning the muzzle up every time, its a plus.

My friend has a Savage MKII with a traditional single stack magazine. I don't like it. In my opinion the 10/22 and 77/22 rotary magazines are the best in the business. The plastic is thick and durable (the clear ones in particular seem to be slightly thicker plastic) and the only moving part rotates on a fixed axis. The feed lips are metal. They are built to last.

I also have a T-bolt, which uses a similar magazine system to Ruger, but it is configured in a figure 8 with two gears that spin. The plastic is thinner. The ejector is metal and built into the magazine, but the feed lips themselves are not metal. I don't worry about them breaking so much as the gears losing close timing as the plastic teeth wear on each other. Sometimes with a new magazine you can feel the rounds sticking in the center portion of the figure 8 where the rounds pass between both cogs. You have to advance it a little bit, back it up, and then load it to free it up. Its too bad the magazine isn't as good as the Ruger, as the whole rifle is just built like a Swiss watch.

http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm227/40rty5ive/DSCF0546.jpg?t=1283585581
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm227/40rty5ive/DSCF0545.jpg?t=1283585626
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm227/40rty5ive/DSCF0544.jpg?t=1283585648

bigfatdave
September 4, 2010, 03:13 AM
If they made tube loading magazines for 22's that had a SIDE LOADING GATE It doesn't work, .22LR rounds are too delicate and having a door that snaps shut on a rimfire round's rim is just unsafe.

I dislike tubular magazines for a reason I don't think has been posted, also. Sticking my hand in front of the muzzle gets old fast.

usmarine0352_2005
September 4, 2010, 05:33 AM
.
I only like tube magazine's on leveractions.


Tube magazines are a pain in the butt to load and I hate that.


I love Ruger 10-22's, there's a reason they've sold so many of them. The Ruger 10-22 is the 1911 and M-16 of .22's, completely customizable and reliable if done right.
.

The Lone Haranguer
September 4, 2010, 07:47 AM
No strong preference in a .22. It is not as if I would be going to war with it. ;) A detachable box magazine is more convenient to load, but holds fewer rounds. A tubular can be damaged - rendering the rifle a single-shot - if dropped or struck. It all evens out.

quietman
September 4, 2010, 01:44 PM
You can buy or make speed loaders for the tube fed
google speed-d-loader for info

I made a 3 chamber, 15 rnd per chamber, speed loader out of PEX and ear plugs. The Appleseed shoot boss took pictures of it he liked the idea so much. Cost $2

As for the hand in front of the muzzle. If you don't disable the last shot hold open on a model 60, it goes a long way in alleviating that apprehension.

If you're looking at Marlins, tube and mag fed use the exact same action.

The action is durable. There are still many original model 60's (50 years old) shooting just fine.

I have a older model 60 with the 22 inch barrel, a Henry Frontier and a 795.

It's a lot easier on the fingers preloading the speed loaders than it is pre loading the magazines and takes less time. So I personally see no advantage of one over the other in loading.

If you're plinking why does an extra 5 seconds matter anyway? You aren't trying to do a speed reload to take out an attacker, and you need something bigger than a 22 for a zombie invasion anyway. And if you empty a 15 shot tube trying to take out a squirrel or crow, you need to be worrying about marksmanship instead.

After all the cartridges are dumped, a single round may hang up on the loading ramp and you may have to clear the action a couple of times and visually inspect it to make sure it is clear. It makes me nervous.You mean you don't do that anyway with every rifle you unload?:confused:

JohnKSa
September 4, 2010, 02:27 PM
I prefer removable magazines for safety purposes. It is easier to positively clear a gun when you can remove the magazine from the firearm. At that point you just clear the chamber and you're done.

I have read several times about people clearing a gun with a non-removable magazine by working the action several times and assuming it was empty when no more cartridges were ejected only to find later that a round was still in the magazine.

I've had a person hand me an "unloaded gun" with a tubular magazine that they had cleared in the above method. When I checked the chamber out of habit the gun was loaded. Apparently the magazine spring was just weak enough that feeding the last round was iffy. When the gun's owner worked the action it didn't feed the last round out of the magazine the first few times he worked the action but it finally fed it the last time, leaving the chamber loaded.

quietman
September 4, 2010, 03:56 PM
When I checked the chamber out of habit the gun was loaded. Apparently the magazine spring was just weak enough that feeding the last round was iffy. When the gun's owner worked the action it didn't feed the last round out of the magazine the first few times he worked the action but it finally fed it the last time, leaving the chamber loaded. And if the person had pulled the tube and cleared the magazine, just like you remove a magazine before clearing the chamber, that wouldn't have happened. And if they'd done a visual inspection like you're supposed to (i.e. like you did John- kudos to you), they would have seen the round waiting to feed. (especially in a tube fed centerfire)

Maybe we need to start a separate thread reminding people of the proper way to clear a rifle, no matter what kind of magazine it has.

CZguy
September 5, 2010, 05:41 AM
And if the person had pulled the tube and cleared the magazine, just like you remove a magazine before clearing the chamber, that wouldn't have happened. And if they'd done a visual inspection like you're supposed to (i.e. like you did John- kudos to you), they would have seen the round waiting to feed. (especially in a tube fed centerfire)

Maybe we need to start a separate thread reminding people of the proper way to clear a rifle, no matter what kind of magazine it has.

Good point. I fail to see how you could have a problem clearing a tubular fed rifle. I pull the bolt back and look for the cartridge follower, and then check to make sure the chamber is empty. I think that just working the action a couple of times, with out visually checking, is inviting a problem no matter how it's fed.

Art Eatman
September 5, 2010, 09:58 AM
Somewhere around age 12 I got a tube-fed Marlin bolt-action, followed a few years later by a tube-fed rem 550. I can't recall the first sign of a problem from either a mechanical standpoint or a safety stand point during some seven years of those two rifles.

Aside from IPSC, I've never had any need to be in any hurry during reloading.

There absolutely MUST be something more trivial than worrying about "clip" vs. "magazine", but I just can't recall it. Getting all harumphy over that is sorta like picking fly-poop out of pepper: Poor career choice.

CZguy
September 5, 2010, 11:31 AM
There absolutely MUST be something more trivial than worrying about "clip" vs. "magazine", but I just can't recall it. Getting all harumphy over that is sorta like picking fly-poop out of pepper: Poor career choice.


Well......how about something novel and new like, "which is better a 10/22 or a model 60". :D

For goodness sakes folks, I'm just kidding, don't start one. :uhoh:

Digger Odell
September 6, 2010, 11:08 PM
Hi liikaboss!:)

I just wanted to state my preference between the two. I have a older model Marlin 60 tube feeder & a Marlin Model 80 bolt action clip magazine both from the fabulous fifties. No complaints from either one. I find the clip magazine rifle easier to use as a single shot & positive visually safer when out with the young ones.
Now I would like to add what tickles me & makes me chuckle.:what:
I have read on different forums, how to tell a newbe & always one of the top five will list the use of the word clip over magazine.:fire: ....If that is the case the mfgs that use the term, namely Marlin & Remington (ref to Model 591, offered in 1971) including John T. Amber, Tecnical Editor of the 1971 GUN DIGEST are all included in this list of newbies.:neener:
Come on guys get over the use of a noun, it won't make your group any tighter or add to the stew pot.:D
Arn't guns fun!!:)

Digger

HOOfan_1
September 7, 2010, 12:15 AM
l
There absolutely MUST be something more trivial than worrying about "clip" vs. "magazine", but I just can't recall it. Getting all harumphy over that is sorta like picking fly-poop out of pepper: Poor career choice.

talking to my dad about this thread...that is EXACTLY what he said...except poop was another word.

IMO arguing that a revolver is not a pistol is about the same...but I suppose that argument has a bit of merit. As long as people know what you are talking about.....

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