how many of you have tried wolff recoil springs in you glock 10mm's?


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Full Metal Jacket
September 1, 2010, 01:38 AM
thinking about getting the heavier 21lb one for the super hot loads in my glock 29.

would normally never consider an aftermarket recoil spring for a glock, except the 10mm has such a broad range of loads in terms of power.

i'd like to hear experiences with wolff, or any others. thanx :)

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357sigRog
September 1, 2010, 03:46 AM
In my Glock 20 I put a 22# wolff spring and metal non captured guide rod. I got this for my Buffalo Bore and Double Tap ammo. Recoil never really bothered me with the stock springs but with the 22 it does take away some recoil. The main reason I purchased the heavier springs was to keep the slide from slamming so hard with the full power loads. All in all I trust the Wolff products and am glad I purchased the heaver spring and guide rod, works great. I actually don't like the stock plastic guide rod in the 10mm for full power loads. I have seen a lot of pictures were the plastic chipped or broke.

seed
September 1, 2010, 04:30 AM
My experience so far is that with my 22# Wolff set-up, Double Taps and Reed's ammo both work well in my G20...they are on the hot side. Weaker Hornady 180gr. hollows: not so much. Not horrible, but they weren't powerful enough for the 22# Wolff spring and rod set-up for 100% cycling.

My friend put in the max weight Wolff springs in his G29 (with rods, of course) and he had 100% reliability with my Reed's stuff. I think his set up is rated at 24#!

And finally, McNett at DT recommends 22# for G20's and 21# for G29's...at least he did when he used to answer the phone himself back in '05.

Full Metal Jacket
September 1, 2010, 04:33 AM
interesting.

for the g29 they have 19lb, 21lb, and 23lb (stock is 17lb). maybe i should split the difference and try 21lbs for total reliability with all power levels...

seed
September 1, 2010, 05:58 AM
That's what McNett recommended.

wow6599
September 1, 2010, 09:09 AM
Wolff guide rod & 20# spring in my G20.

gofastman
September 1, 2010, 11:49 AM
I like ISMI, simply for the fact its flat wire like the stock piece, I figure Glock may have done this for a reason.

Full Metal Jacket
October 7, 2010, 02:45 PM
ok, guys here's what i've tried. in my glock 29 i currently have the forward wolff spring at 19lbs, and the smaller diameter rear spring at 21lbs.

i tried both springs at the 21lb weight, and although no malfunctions occurred, i noticed the weaker shells didn't eject very far. so that concerned me about weak wrist jams from the heavier springs, in a defensive scenario.

seed
October 7, 2010, 08:24 PM
Why not try to simulate weaker holds? Don't bother with mega-limp-wristing simulations though as this will definitely jam a Glock.

Full Metal Jacket
October 7, 2010, 09:07 PM
yeah, that's what i did. i didn't super limp wrist it. i just tried a weaker grip, and the one shell that barely ejected even hit me in the face.

maybe the 21# springs just need to be broken in, but i think i might stick with the 19lb one up front, and 21lb one in the back to help reduce possible LW jams....

gofastman
October 7, 2010, 09:22 PM
wont that make the 19lb spring wear out faster because it have more give and moves more each time the gun is fired?

Full Metal Jacket
October 8, 2010, 01:47 AM
hmmm, i don't think it'll make the forward 19lb spring wear any faster with a 21lb spring behind it.


.....now you have me thinking lol

Broken Anvil
October 8, 2010, 08:52 AM
I use them in my S&W 10mm 1006. Got a 22 pounder, the stock is IIRC a 19 pound. It is a good bit stiffer but functions with any round. Even light reloads work every time. I use them in my CZ75 also, no problems.

gofastman
October 8, 2010, 11:37 AM
hmmm, i don't think it'll make the forward 19lb spring wear any faster with a 21lb spring behind it.


.....now you have me thinking lol
Its entirely possible I'm talking out my rear end, lol

MTMilitiaman
October 8, 2010, 07:51 PM
First off, you should be aware that contrary to what appears to be public opinion, increasing the strength of your recoil spring will give you a corresponding increase in recoil. There is just no way around the physics. Eventually, the extra force it takes to compress that spring is transferred through the frame and into your hand, wrist, and forearm where it must be absorbed and dealt with as recoil.

That being said, there are some advantages as well.

I found that my Glock 20 was snappy with full power loads and launched spent brass into the next county. Sure, it wasn't unpleasant, it wouldn't beat you up, but it was definitely a handful. For me, shooting the G20 stock with full power loads was like trying to hold onto a bar of soap--the thing felt like it was constantly trying to break your grip and squirm away from you. When I started reloading for it, not being able to find the brass became a problem. I installed a KKM Precision barrel to keep my brass in decent condition, but it became apparent something would have to be done to keep it close enough to retrieve.

So I bought a SS captive guide rod assembly and a pair of ISMI recoil springs--a 20 pound and a 22 pound.

The 22 pound made a big difference in the shooting characteristics of the pistol. While there was more felt recoil, the heavier spring did help smooth things out. The recoil impulse was slower and less jerky. It was easier to track the front sight, and the thing didn't seem nearly as anxious to slip my grip. The distance the spent casings flew was easily halved.

I've settled on the 20 pound spring, though. It is a happy medium. It doesn't increase the recoil as much as the heavier spring, but still makes things appreciably smoother. It still launches brass, but at least keeps them in the same general area. Overall, for my needs, I've found it to be the best combination of shooting characteristics.

I would recommend you give it a try and see what works for you. Springs are relatively cheap, even on my budget. However, I must warn you that without proper tools, putting those heavier springs on and off that captive recoil assembly can be a royal PITA. So if you plan on doing a lot of spring swapping, I would recommend a non-captured recoil assembly until you figure out what you are going to stick with.

varoadking
October 8, 2010, 08:15 PM
Wolff guide rod & 20# spring in my G20.

Likewise in my G20SF...

Full Metal Jacket
October 9, 2010, 12:44 AM
The 22 pound made a big difference in the shooting characteristics of the pistol. While there was more felt recoil, the heavier spring did help smooth things out. The recoil impulse was slower and less jerky. It was easier to track the front sight, and the thing didn't seem nearly as anxious to slip my grip. The distance the spent casings flew was easily halved.

I've settled on the 20 pound spring, though. It is a happy medium. It doesn't increase the recoil as much as the heavier spring, but still makes things appreciably smoother. It still launches brass, but at least keeps them in the same general area. Overall, for my needs, I've found it to be the best combination of shooting characteristics.

I would recommend you give it a try and see what works for you. Springs are relatively cheap, even on my budget. However, I must warn you that without proper tools, putting those heavier springs on and off that captive recoil assembly can be a royal PITA. So if you plan on doing a lot of spring swapping, I would recommend a non-captured recoil assembly until you figure out what you are going to stick with.

you're right. i noticed that the heavier springs caused more felt recoil. the 21lb one left my hand a little soar after a box of full power 10mm's from swampfox :D.

for the glock 29, i have the wolff 19lb, 21lb, and 23lb springs.

since the 21lb springs left me a little sore, i decided to put the 19lb up front, and 21lb behind it, which has a little more muzzle flip, but the recoil impulse doesn't shoot straight back into your hand. seems to be a happy medium for me lol.


as for the wolff glock 29 dual spring uncaptured assembly: it's no more difficult to install than the stock glock one. i've done it numerous times at home and at the range trying different combos of springs and ammo.

i have had a few friends tell me it was a pain to install the uncaptured wolff system on their glock 20's.

you'd figure a dual system would be harder, however, it's quite the opposite. :)

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