Police Officer Leaves Assault Rifle On Roadside


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starfuryzeta
December 12, 2003, 10:14 AM
http://www.wftv.com/news/2677469/detail.html


ORLANDO, Fla. -- Another Orlando Police Department officer is in trouble for leaving a weapon in a public place. This time, it was a high-powered assault rifle forgotten on busy Curry Ford Road, near Primrose.

The officer had a flat. So, to get to the spare, he had to pull out everything from his trunk, including the bag that contained his AR-15 assault rifle and ammunition. It was dark, so when he pulled away, he just didn't see the bag.

The weapon is powerful and accurate, and big enough to grab your attention. Last week, it gave staff at the Daybreak Diner a wake-up call they'll never forget. A woman handed it over to them after she found the rifle next to their parking lot.

Waitress's hid the rifle from customers and called cops. They used the serial number on the gun to track it back to Officer Sam McFarland.

"He had gone off shift and was not aware of it, until we made him aware of it, by a supervisor who called him," says Sgt. Bryan Gilliam, Orlando Police.

The mishap took place on the very day Channel 9 reported on another incident at a showing of the film "Finding Nemo." An Orange County reserve deputy left his personal gun in a theatre packed with kids.

A week before that, an off-duty Orlando officer lost his personal gun in an elementary school auditorium.

OPD's spokesman says to remember, they do have 670 officers carrying guns.

"There is always the possibility someone is going to misplace one or drop one and, unfortunately for us, it happened not once, but twice," says Sgt. Gilliam.

Both Orlando officers are now subjects of internal affairs investigations. Their fellow officers are being warned to keep a closer eye on their guns. Gun dealers say they hope they listen.

"I don't want to see any guns lying on the side of the road where a civilian can pick them up," comments gun dealer Larry Anderson.

OPD is installing new gunlocks inside their units. That means officer won't have to carry the black bags in their trunks much longer.

I don't think this instance is as bad as the other two mentioned and linked to at the bottom of the page.

If you enjoyed reading about "Police Officer Leaves Assault Rifle On Roadside" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Mark Tyson
December 12, 2003, 10:24 AM
So this is how those weapons "flood the streets" . . .

until we made him aware of it, by a supervisor who called him," says Sgt. Bryan Gilliam, Orlando Police.

I'd love to have heard THAT conversation!

ballistic gelatin
December 12, 2003, 10:28 AM
I don't want to see any guns lying on the side of the road where a civilian can pick them up," comments gun dealer Larry Anderson.Like civillians don't have any business with firearms. I'm not so sure I would have turned it in.

aquapong
December 12, 2003, 10:38 AM
Uhh...yeah it would be legal in like 10 months.:uhoh:

You would have to turn it in because undoubtedly the cops would place it on the missing/stolen list and if you ever tried to trade it in or got caught doing something dumb with the rifle with you, you'd be charged with attempting to sell a stolen firearm or whatever.

Getting this close to the sunset of the ban, we do not need to give antis more public displays of irresponible gun ownership. There are enough displays out there without us contributing.

Mad Man
December 12, 2003, 11:00 AM
The mishap took place on the very day Channel 9 reported on another incident at a showing of the film "Finding Nemo." An Orange County reserve deputy left his personal gun in a theatre packed with kids.

A week before that, an off-duty Orlando officer lost his personal gun in an elementary school auditorium.

OPD's spokesman says to remember, they do have 670 officers carrying guns.


3 incidents in a week!

If you go to the news link above, there are links to two other stories:

Previous Stories:

* November 21, 2003: Another Police Officer Leaves Gun Inside Local School (http://www.wftv.com/news/2656510/detail.html)
* November 20, 2003: Cop In Trouble After Leaving Loaded Handgun At School (http://www.wftv.com/news/2653110/detail.html)

45R
December 12, 2003, 11:04 AM
I talked to a CHP officer about guys leaving gear on their cars. IT happens more than you think.

Travis McGee
December 12, 2003, 11:12 AM
WHOOPS! Bad career move. If I found it, I might have given the cop a break and returned it discretely with no press. (Good way to earn brownie points with the LEOs.)

This boo-boo does not even compare to my top five stupid Matt tricks.

http://matthewbracken.web.aplus.net/bookcover.jpg

Mad Man
December 12, 2003, 11:20 AM
my top five stupid Matt tricks

I've gotta ask: what are the top five stupd Matt tricks?

The larger point is not that people don't do stupid things; we all have, and all will. Hopefully everybody involved learns a lesson.

But when one set of laws (re: "safe storage" and "gun free school zones") is proposed/enforced for us peasants, while the noble knights are allowed to violate them, something is wrong. Especially when the actions of the noble knights endanger children more than mere possession by a peasant does.

There was an incident in Pennsylania about two years ago when a police chief left a Glock in the bathroom at an elementary school, where it was found by some kid. The chief was hailed as a hero. (If I have time, I'll find the story and add the link later). If I even have a gun in my car on school grounds, I could face prosecution.


PS -- looking forward to your book. The excerpts on the web site were great, and were enough to convince me to buy it.

Monkeyleg
December 12, 2003, 05:55 PM
"OPD's spokesman says to remember, they do have 670 officers carrying guns."

Every fall here in Wisconsin we have 600,000 to 700,000 hunters out in the woods carrying guns. I wonder how many of them lose their guns?

Bigjake
December 12, 2003, 06:01 PM
Why does this sound like some VPC tripe.... 3 cops loose thier weapons, and 2 of them in places just crawling with the pooooooor widdle childwen!:scrutiny:

Edward429451
December 12, 2003, 06:03 PM
"There is always the possibility someone is going to misplace one or drop one and, unfortunately for us, it happened not once, but twice," says Sgt. Gilliam.

They say that like it's an hinest mistake and no big deal. If a citizen would do something like that, they'd be crucified.

New lowers are only 250 though...hmmm:evil: :D

MicroBalrog
December 12, 2003, 06:05 PM
bag that contained his AR-15 assault rifle

What's an AR-15 assault rifle?:what:

BluesBear
December 12, 2003, 06:06 PM
Officer loses a Kel-Tec .32 in the auditorium at his daughters school program? :uhoh:
Orlando Police Department's policy doesn't require off-duty cops to have a gun, but does encourage it.Do they "encourage" weapons retention? :scrutiny:
I don't think he knew that he had lost it there. It was one of the places he was looking and, unfortunately, he didn't find it when he looked for it,
If your weapon is so lightweight/small that you don't notice when it departs your person, you NEED a heavier/bigger gun! :rolleyes:

Perhaps instead of trigger locks they should start making lanyard rings mandatory.

If one of us civilians did this we'd surely be charged with reckless endangerment.

Quartus
December 12, 2003, 06:07 PM
Can you say, "career limiting move"?


Yeah, I thought you could.

Cosmoline
December 12, 2003, 06:49 PM
Umm, a civilian DID pick it up, saving said officer's behind!

Roadkill Coyote
December 12, 2003, 07:31 PM
Barring some sort of exigent circumstance, which none of these incidents appear to have, there is no excuse for leaving a gun lying around in a public, or uncontrolled private setting.

In all honesty, we should have an acronym for this sort of thing, say NL, for negligent loss. After all, its mainly caused by the same sort of complacency, isn't it? Its certainly the same sort of often repeated error.

An acronym would also emphasize that this is, like NDs, a training issue. If it were mere common sense, it would not be happening. So it has to be addressed and revisited in-service as required in training.

Training isn't just the flashy bits, its the whole package. This sort of thing is what happens when we neglect that. :scrutiny:



The most positive aspect of any of these stories is the sucess of the Eddie Eagle program, which we should be taking special note of for the next time the other side claims it doesn't work.

Dionysusigma
December 12, 2003, 07:53 PM
That article is so full of what I like to call "meaningless modifiers..." especially when they're inaccurate :rolleyes:

high-powered assault rifle
As an AK fan, I'm sure everyone knows my opinions on the power of .223... and besides, I'd like to get the name of the person that the rifle assaulted :p
The weapon is powerful and accurate, and big enough to grab your attention.
Powerful? ...see above comment. Accurate? I'll give it that. Big enough to grab your attention? Meh... like size ever mattered in how dangerous something is. Plus, it didn't exactly catch the officer's attention, now did it?
OPD is installing new gunlocks inside their units. That means officer won't have to carry the black bags in their trunks much longer.
I've studied Mass Communications with a focus on Print Media (which now apparently includes the Internet). This last bit is a fine example of how shoddy this article really is. "Gunlocks" is two words. Not "officer;" it's "officers." Not "won't have to carry the black bags" it should be "will no longer need to carry black bags." And finally, it should be one sentence, with "That means" replaced with "meaning."

The story and all its facts may be true, but it's crap like this that strains credibility. :mad: :banghead: :fire: :barf:

Travis McGee
December 12, 2003, 08:31 PM
Mad Man:

I will tell you two of the top five stupid Matt tricks. /4/ Crashing and totalling a 1971 Chevy Nova under insanely stupid circumstances in high school. /5/ Crashing one boat into another boat very expensively, under extremely stupid circumstances.

I will not mention the others, they are still too painful to fess up to. In some cases the records have even been expunged. In some ways it's a miracle I'm alive, free and married at age 46.

That's why I would give this cop a break, if I had found the lost rifle. I've done worse, and folks gave me a lot of breaks along the way.

Cops even. Especially cops. God bless the cops that gave me a break.

Matt

http://matthewbracken.web.aplus.net/snakelogo.jpg

admar2
December 12, 2003, 09:14 PM
he went off duty without accounting for his rifle?

Standing Wolf
December 12, 2003, 09:32 PM
Commoners don't need guns. Only the police need guns.

Baba Louie
December 12, 2003, 09:56 PM
Alls well that ends well.
Interesting read. Loaded with straight news facts.
Looks like a case of another evil black assault rifle taken off the streets of America and safely placed into the hands of local law enforcement authorities.
Wonder what it'd bring in one of them there gun buybacks? :D Maybe a $50 gift certificate or a free movie.
Poor schmo will never hear the end of that one I'm sure.
Thank goodness for good samaratins.

Adios

WonderNine
December 13, 2003, 05:46 AM
high-powered assault rifle

:barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:

WonderNine
December 13, 2003, 05:47 AM
Once again, in case you didn't catch that the first time.

high-powered assault rifle

:barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:

Nightfall
December 13, 2003, 06:37 AM
"I don't want to see any guns lying on the side of the road where a civilian can pick them up," comments gun dealer Larry Anderson.

Yeah, it's too bad the civilian who did pick it up went crazy from the assault rifle mind control rays.

TheOtherOne
December 13, 2003, 07:44 AM
Like civillians don't have any business with firearms. I'm not so sure I would have turned it in.Beyond our own personal feelings and conscience about what do with lost items, is there anything that says a gun has to be treated different than anything else you might find. Finders keepers?

Navy joe
December 13, 2003, 07:48 AM
"I don't want to see any guns lying on the side of the road where a civilian can pick them up," comments gun dealer Larry Anderson.

You mean like the civilian that was changing his tire and shoulda put it back in his trunk? One gun dealer I'd never shop at.

I'd give it back in person, right after I took it to the range. :evil:

280PLUS
December 13, 2003, 07:50 AM
i guess the time i had to go all the way back to boston to retrieve my extension ladder that was still leaning against the building wasn't so bad after all...

i'm glad it wasn't my HIGH POWERED ASSAULT RIFLE though,,,i 'd have to admit...

heck,,,i forget / lose tools quite often (thats why i buy cheap ones) just none of my tools are guns is all that has saved me...

:D

ajacobs
December 13, 2003, 08:05 AM
As an AK fan, I'm sure everyone knows my opinions on the power of .223... and besides, I'd like to get the name of the person that the rifle assaulted


It doesn't have to have assulted anybody, like it or not that is a real classification by the atfe now. Granted the author didn't know it and hopefully it will go away in September.

WilderBill
December 13, 2003, 10:26 AM
Yeah, I might have tried to return it.
More likely I would have realized that it was lost by someone that wasn't responsable enough to have any business being around firearms.
In that case I would have just felt compelled to "take it off the streets" to make us all safer.
One thing for sure, if said officer had paid for it out of his own pocket, it would have been important enough to him for him to pay at least some atttention. :)

geegee
December 13, 2003, 11:12 AM
I have to say that if it was me that found it, I may have to alert the local TV news station to let them know that a responsible gun owning civilian was returning a rifle to it's rightful owner. And by the way, here's who the owner is, if by chance you happen to be there with a camera. ;) geegee

Ky Larry
December 13, 2003, 02:23 PM
Back in 1978, I was in the Air Force, stationed at Pope AFB in N.C. I came out of the flightline snack bar about 3 a.m. one morning ad got in my car.
An Army jeep parked next to me and 2 M.P.'s got out. The passenger leaned his M16 against the side of the jeep while he streched and woke up. They both went in the snack bar and left that M16. All I had to do was roll down the window and pick it up. The base gate was only a few hundred yards away. I must say I seriously thought about it . Instead, I took the rifle in the snack bar and gave it back to the M.P.'s. I'm glad I did.

Master Blaster
December 15, 2003, 01:56 PM
MAybe we should have a new forum, called " Why Guns are for police officers only"

We can permanantly post stories like this there as a reminder to be safe, It could include the story of the philadelphia veteran of 9 years who passed her loaded glock around to a classroom full of Kindergardeners.
They returned it to her and she then pulled the trigger and fired a round into the floor hitting two of the children with shrapnel from the riccochetting round.:rolleyes:

ballistic gelatin
December 15, 2003, 02:15 PM
Master Blaster, tell me that didn't really happen.

geegee, that's an interesting way to make friends with the local LEOs. But I like it! :D

ny32182
December 15, 2003, 05:04 PM
Yeah, the officer definitely should have put that pea-shooter back in his trunk.

I think there should be NO double standard in cases like this... the LEO should face the same consequence as any other civilian that happened to pull a similar unbelieveably stupid move.

Drjones
December 15, 2003, 06:51 PM
Beyond our own personal feelings and conscience about what do with lost items, is there anything that says a gun has to be treated different than anything else you might find. Finders keepers?

Sure its different.

This is govt property, and since I am a taxpayer, its part mine.






:D :D :D

Drjones
December 15, 2003, 06:55 PM
Master Blaster:

You serious??? Is that a true story??? :uhoh:

:what:


Yep, more evidence that only cops should have guns...

:banghead:

Med 10
December 15, 2003, 07:02 PM
I thought the police were civilians.:rolleyes:

Drjones
December 15, 2003, 07:08 PM
Med:

Not according to them.

:banghead:

hansolo
December 15, 2003, 07:35 PM
RE: "LEO injures school kids by firing round into the floor."........Now, I love kids -- heck, I WAS one -- but, the only Show and Tell that even came close to THIS one when I was a tike and a fellow classmate brought in some roadkill(true)in a gunnysack.

I hope the injured kids are O.K.

Quartus
December 15, 2003, 08:14 PM
Master Blaster, tell me that didn't really happen.


It happened. We had quite a discussion about it over on TFL.


Complete with all the usual "You haven't been a cop so shut up!" stuff. :rolleyes:

BluesBear
December 16, 2003, 03:47 AM
Med 10said
I thought the police were civilians Drjones said
Not according to them. Hey guys, we've already covered this. (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?s=&threadid=47716)

Steel
December 16, 2003, 08:54 AM
What's an AR-15 assault rifle?

An AR-15 that is guilty of assault. Lock it up!

armoredman
December 16, 2003, 09:13 AM
I like the idea of turning it in for a gun buyback....
;)

Master Blaster
December 16, 2003, 09:41 AM
Officer's gun goes off during show-and-tell
By Barbara Boyer and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr.
Inquirer Staff Writers

Shortly after a Philadelphia policewoman passed around a loaded handgun among students during show-and-tell at a Germantown charter school, the weapon accidentally discharged yesterday afternoon, grazing a 10-year-old boy in the face.

The student, fourth grader James Reeves, received five stitches at Temple University Children's Hospital and returned home last night in good condition, while police and school officials continued their investigation into the incident at Imani Education Circle Charter School in Germantown.

The officer, Vanessa Carter-Moragne, 39, a five-year veteran assigned to the Ninth Police District in Center City, was removed from street duty and is now the subject of an Internal Affairs investigation, police said.

Acting Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson called the officer's actions "unheard of and inexcusable."

"We're grateful that the injuries were not more serious. . . . It's fortunate that no one got killed today," Johnson said. "I cannot give you a logical explanation for Officer Vanessa Carter-Moragne's poor judgment."

Philadelphia Police Capt. Edward Chiodetti said that about 3 p.m., the officer went to the school to pick up her son and was interacting with the students in the boy's classroom. Chiodetti said the children first wanted to see her badge, which she displayed, and then asked to see her weapon, a 9 mm Glock semiautomatic.

Johnson said the officer removed the clip from the weapon and then passed the gun among the children.

Carter-Moragne "allowed the children to handle it," Johnson said. "When she attempted to place the magazine back into the Glock, her gun accidentally discharged."

Even if a clip, which contains the bullets, is removed, a round can remain in the chamber unless it is taken out separately.

"You never know. You can pull the clip out and there's one in the chamber," Johnson said.

A girl who was among the 23 children in the classroom at the time of the incident, 9-year-old Aatiqah Johnson, said: "Everybody was passing it around."

The weapon eventually was returned to the officer.

Aatiqah said there was a bang, and then she saw blood.

"She accidentally pulled the trigger," Aatiqah said as she was leaving school holding hands with her mother, Melita Johnson.

Authorities said the officer most likely pulled the trigger as she attempted to insert the clip back into the grip.

Johnson said the bullet hit the floor and a fragment ricocheted and grazed James Reeves' right cheek.

Other students said they were told to return to their rooms after the gun went off as police descended on the campus on the 5600 block of Greene Street.

Johnson said officers are trained to never take their weapons to a school or use a gun during a demonstration. Instead, Johnson said, the department advises to use pictures or videos.

Imani principal Francine Fulton said that the school encouraged parents to participate in such activities and that the school was aware of the demonstration. Fulton declined to discuss the matter further.

Johnson said the demonstration was not coordinated through the Police Department. Officials said arrangements had been made for counselors to speak with children at the school today.

Throughout the afternoon yesterday, concerned parents arrived at the school to pick up their children. Many of the parents had heard of the incident from news reports or from friends and already knew that their own children were fine.

Tim Williams, whose son Armani is in kindergarten, said he wanted to know more about what happened.

"I was relieved to find out that it was an off-duty officer and not another student," Williams said. Still, he was concerned about a gun being brought into a classroom. The whole situation, he said, "was too close for comfort."

Another parent who rushed to the school, Rhoshanna Morgan, picked up her first grader, Nadirah, 6.

Morgan said that she learned of the discharge from relatives who work at the school and that she hoped future show-and-tell programs would be safer.

"I just hope all the children would be safe," Morgan said.

The incident came five days after an off-duty school district police officer who was working as a part-time school-bus driver came under investigation when students from Imani and another charter school told their parents he threatened them with a gun.

Police said that officer, who at the time was driving a school bus, stopped on the route after school to calm unruly children. The officer, whose name was not released, hollered at the kids to sit down and be quiet and made reference to his gun. He was not charged, but the matter remained under investigation

ballistic gelatin
December 16, 2003, 10:52 AM
"You never know. You can pull the clip out and there's one in the chamber," Johnson said.
Yeah, guns are so unpredictable.

Here's a real story...with cops, guns and classrooms.

I was taking a Public Speaking class at the local community college. One night, the City Police Chief was giving his speach (he was a student) and made reference to how people would never forget the time Chief so and so pulled out his pistol and fired it into the air. While he's saying this, he actually pulled out his revolver and fired it into the ceiling! BOOM!! Fortunately, he fired a blank.

As he spoke and raised the snubby .38, I couldn't help but think "that doesn't look too smart". Then as my ears rang and smoke filled the room, I couldn't decide whether I should fall to the floor, run for the door or wipe my drawrs. Once my heart started beating again, I realized it was a stunt. He got an A+

Stinkyshoe
December 16, 2003, 12:43 PM
"What's an AR-15 assault rifle?"

According to my college law book, "assault" occurs when a defendant does some act that makes the plantiff fear imminent battery. So basically, you can assault someone without really doing anything(except causing fear). The battery is the actual physical act. I think that since these assault bans are written by anti-gun lawyers and politicians, they take advantage of the word "assault" There is a common understood version of "assault", which to me means to punch, kick, trip, rape, beat, club, or knife someone. They label a particular make of gun an assault weapon, while really all that means is looking at the gun causes them to spontaneously pee down their own leg. The black nonreflective finish along with the pistol grip logically must make the "fear of imminent battery" more imminent. It is not a matter of the gun being used to carry out hideous evil acts of violence, but that it causes fear in people.

Now don't get me wrong, I think the Ar15 is one heck of a good weapon, but it does not assault my conscience. I find that a lot of the programming on cable tv is more assaulting and dangerous than an inanimate piece of metal. I can't stand to watch modern pg13 films because they are so full of violence. The horror films(Bone Collector, Ghost Ship) I find to be offensive and assaulting. I wonder who dreams up some of this crap sometimes. I think it goes back to ones own mental out look on life. I think that anything can be a weapon. Oriental farmers learned to use there farming implements to be weapons. A sharpened #2 pencil would likely do damage to someone, given an agressors/defenders will to use it in such a way. What about a roll of quarters inside of a handkerchief? Thats called a billy club. My point is that the material viewed on television today brainwashes the viewer. It can program an individual to feel invincible(movies like XXX, HULK, Gone in 60 seconds), or change the standards for what is appropriate and tasteful language. When someones mental/spiritual outlook turns to a selfish and self serving way, well then a gun or anything could become an "assault weapon". Keep in mind that it is not the guns that are changing(physically and functionally), but the way in which they are viewed. 200 years ago, the standard military gun was a single shot rifle. Now it is a rifle that can cycle 600rpm. Was the single shot rifle considered an assault weapon in those days? Who knows? Under the premise that the mind is the weapon and the gun,knife,stick,flashlight is the tool, then maybe movies and "entertainment" that promote acts of violence need to be regulated by the Bureau of Movies, Entertainment, and Offensive Music.

The purpose of labelling it an assault weapon is to program the sheeple. Then they can call anything owns "those guns" a terrorist. Pretty soon, grandpas old Rem870 will be a weapon, as well as those "evil bolt action rifles". So much for "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security for a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." I can't wait til I have to stop by "Rent-a-Gun" on opening day of deer season so a can get my gun and one bullet, so I can exercise my right to be enslaved.

Quartus
December 16, 2003, 02:09 PM
all that means is looking at the gun causes them to spontaneously pee down their own leg


Alright! Where's the "slapping the floor rolling around laughing" icon when I need it?


:D :D :D




Laughter aside, that was an excellent post, Stinkyshoe.


(Wierd handle, though.) ;)

ajacobs
December 16, 2003, 03:23 PM
As much as we hate it we have to live with those weapons being legally called assult weapons, atleast until September. And then they will still be them in some states. OF course reporters will continue to call them that even after the ban sunset out of stupidity.

seeker_two
December 16, 2003, 06:46 PM
Of course, I would return the nice officer's rifle....

...but it's a crying shame that I found it after all the ammo and LEO-only standard-capacity magazines had mysteriously vanished. :(


(BTW, anybody have a Dremmel tool & a rebluing kit that I could borrow? :evil: )

Blain
December 16, 2003, 06:51 PM
I wish I coud someday come across such a "find". Would be like a mini birthday.

greyhound
December 17, 2003, 07:16 AM
Orlando Police Department's policy doesn't require off-duty cops to have a gun, but does encourage it.

Wonder if they also "encourage" non-LEOs to get trained and CCW?

Even in a shall-issue state I bet thats going too far...

Drjones
December 17, 2003, 01:03 PM
Master Blaster:

Thank you for posting that article.

It is positively revolting and frightening to know that there are LEOs out there without even a rudimentary understanding of the basic rules of firearms safety.

I can't believe that officer is allowed to drive!!!

Some of the quotes in that article were priceless...


"When she attempted to place the magazine back into the Glock, her gun accidentally discharged."


No it didn't. The nitwit officer obviously had her finger on the trigger. It was a NEGLIGENT discharge.

Even if a clip, which contains the bullets, is removed, a round can remain in the chamber unless it is taken out separately. I simply cannot believe that the officer was so painfully unaware of this fact.

"You never know. You can pull the clip out and there's one in the chamber," Johnson said.

YES, you DO know.

1) All guns are always loaded.

2) Verify the condition of the chamber yourself EVERY TIME you handle the weapon.


"She accidentally pulled the trigger," Aatiqah said as she was leaving school holding hands with her mother, Melita Johnson.

Authorities said the officer most likely pulled the trigger as she attempted to insert the clip back into the grip.


What a wonderful technique that is...keeping your finger on the trigger while loading the firearm....

Some days there just aren't enough of these: :banghead: :cuss:

I hope that officer VERY promptly lost her badge and driver's license and requires supervision to walk the streets to ensure she doesn't "accidentally" harm anyone else. :cuss:

Balog
December 17, 2003, 02:28 PM
Uhhh, Drjones, this thread is about cops leaving their guns around. The thread about the cop who shot the kid in class is different.

Drjones
December 17, 2003, 02:47 PM
Uhhh, Drjones, this thread is about cops leaving their guns around. The thread about the cop who shot the kid in class is different.

Yeah, I know.

A few posts above mine, Master posted the article about the cop shooting the kid, and I was replying to that.

:)

Balog
December 17, 2003, 02:55 PM
OIC. If you're interested, there is a thread about that here.

keyhole
December 17, 2003, 04:34 PM
Well we have had 2 incidents of guys at the range leaving their guns behind. Luckily the guns were given to someone, who contacted one of the execs, and we located the owner. Needless to say, they were were happy about getting the guns back.

In the officers defense, when you handle something all the time, you might become complacent about it, sad to say though.

Happens, but nowadays, it really makes the news. Probably happens more, but some people do not make a big deal out of it.

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