Is this ok?


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jon86
September 6, 2010, 11:38 PM
Can I use white lithium grease in a can to lubricate a glock?:confused:

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dom1104
September 6, 2010, 11:51 PM
people have been known to use WLG on glocks, but personally I would use a weapon lubricant designed or at least tested for firearms.

Or even synthetic motor oil.

jon86
September 7, 2010, 12:05 AM
Well right now I just use Hoppe's lubricating oil, which lubricates well, but I have to re-lub about every month to keep'em wet. I prefer it if they're just a little wet. I was thinking that grease would stay in place longer.

dawico
September 7, 2010, 12:29 AM
The spray grease is very thin, and probably won't stay any longer than your oil. Try some regular grease, or gun specific grease. Glocks don't need to stay wet anyway, but to each their own.

DasFriek
September 7, 2010, 01:18 AM
Ive used white Lithium grease as a low cost lube thats easy to clean up. Ive found no issues over the last year ive used it.
I just found some gun specific White grease with Teflon at a local high end rimfire store so ill be using that a while. Ive found it kind of hard to find gun grease that i would trust.

One maker that makes some but is rather expensive is Wilsons grease, I think Brownells should have that. I like their Ultima Oil which has a pretty high viscosity so it stays in place well and wont evaporate much.

Ive been known to use Mobil 1 Synthetic motor oil in the highest viscosity i could find which works well also.

CLP is just a cleaner to me and great for wiping exteriors since it drys fast.

Gord
September 7, 2010, 01:45 AM
As far as I can tell most of the weapon-specific lubricants are simply a way to sell a product to a niche market for five times what it would usually go for in a general-purpose application.

I've been using WLG from Autozone on my CZ-52 exclusively for the past eight months or so, because I got tired of having to re-oil it every time I went out. Haven't had any problems so far.

Taroman
September 7, 2010, 02:16 AM
I have used Lubriplate (WLG) as well as regular chassis grease on all sorts of semi-autos (Glock, 1911, M1 Garand, M&P, Buckmark) and all have worked just fine.

IMHO "gun grease" is just marketing hype.

REAPER4206969
September 7, 2010, 02:31 AM
Glock only recommends firearm grade oil.

Full Metal Jacket
September 7, 2010, 03:30 AM
i like to squirt grease into the striker channel until it's packed full! :eek:

REAPER4206969
September 7, 2010, 03:33 AM
i like to squirt grease into the striker channel until it's packed full!
So do many LEO's...

Full Metal Jacket
September 7, 2010, 03:36 AM
So do many LEO's...


lol, really? do they then realize what the cause is when their glock won't fire?

REAPER4206969
September 7, 2010, 04:07 AM
lol, really? do they then realize what the cause is when their glock won't fire?

Charleston, North Charleston police to stick with Glock 21 for service pistol
Officials say they've had few problems with gun, despite misfirings reported in other areas

BY GLENN SMITH
The Post and Courier

The Charleston area's two largest police departments say their officers will continue to carry a popular brand of .45-caliber pistol, despite reports of the guns misfiring in other parts of the country.

Police in Los Angeles and Portland, Ore., have barred officers from carrying the Glock Model 21 pistol amid concerns about the weapon's safety. But the pistol remains the standard duty weapon for hundreds of police officers in Charleston and North Charleston.

Police officials in the two Lowcountry cities said they have used these pistols for years without problems and see no reason to make a change.

"We haven't had a bit of problem with it," said interim Charleston police Chief Ned Hethington. "It's a great weapon."

Glock Inc.'s pistols have become the weapon of choice for many Lowcountry law enforcement agencies, most of which use the company's .40-caliber pistols. None of the departments contacted Monday reported problems with Glock guns in their arsenals.

Glock's pistols, made of polymer plastic and steel components, have proven popular with police across the nation because the guns combine power with a lightweight, durable design. More than 7,500 law enforcement agencies, or about 65 percent of the market, use Glocks, according to the company's Web site.

Los Angeles police, however, ordered officers to stop using the Model 21 last week after reports that the .45-caliber weapons misfired dozens of times during training and firearm-qualification sessions, the Los Angeles Times reported. By October, the department had received more than 40 reports of "light strikes," which occur when a firing pin hits a loaded cartridge with insufficient force to discharge a bullet, the newspaper reported.

Last year, Portland's police chief ordered an immediate recall of Model 21 pistols after two separate incidents in which the guns exploded in the hands of officers. Two officers received minor injuries in the incidents, which occurred on the firing range, said Sgt. Brian Schmautz, a spokesman for the department.

Portland police surveyed law enforcement agencies across the country and learned of others that had experienced problems with .45-caliber Glocks, Schmautz said. Portland police stayed with Glock but switched to the company's 9 mm pistols, he said.

Some observers have questioned whether the incidents point to a defect in the guns, while others have suggested that low-quality ammunition or poor maintenance could be to blame.

Representatives from the Austrian arms company, which has U.S. offices in Smyrna, Ga., did not return a call Monday seeking comment on the matter.

North Charleston police started using Glock Model 21 pistols in 1997, and all of the department's nearly 200 uniformed officers carry the weapon, said Spencer Pryor, spokesman for the department. Misfires have not been an issue, he said.

Charleston police use two types of .45-caliber Glocks, the Model 21 and the smaller Model 30. The department has used these pistols since 1993 and now has about 400 of the guns in its arsenal, Hethington said.

"I can't say we haven't had a light strike in there some place, but we really haven't had a problem with it," said Cpl. Craig Farr, range master and a firearms instructor for the department. "It's been a reliable weapon for us."

Contact Glenn Smith at 937-5556 or gsmith@postandcourier.com...

Full Metal Jacket
September 7, 2010, 04:15 AM
^^yeah, i remember that. they probably squeezed a whole tube of lithium grease into the striker channel. i cannot believe their armorers would allow lubing the striker channel, then not realize that's the cause. what imbeciles lmao

The Lone Haranguer
September 7, 2010, 08:18 PM
It can't hurt anything, but grease is not really necessary on a Glock because there is little actual slide/frame contact, only through four small steel inserts. (On guns with full engagement between the slide and frame rails it is a different story.) It would have the advantage of a little more "staying power" (i.e., less runoff or evaporation) if you let the gun sit for a long time between firings or cleanings. All you would need is a tiny dab on each frame rail insert and the center rail in the bottom of the slide. If by "can" you mean an aerosol can, it is not necessary to spray it on, either. You can just dab it on with a cotton swab or something. Personally, I prefer a heavy oil like BreakFree CLP (in the liquid squeeze bottle).

Zerodefect
September 7, 2010, 08:29 PM
I agree that thin oils like CLP evap too quickly. But you should be popping the slide off monthly (at least) to check for lint and debris in the gun anyway if it's a CCW.

It only takes 30 seconds. 10 min to detail strip the slide and clean the striker channel.

So sure, as long as you follow the above, WLG is a fine Glock lube. Spray it in a small cub and wipe it on with tiny paintbrush. Don't spray your gun.

I mix STP/ATF for medium thick oils, I'll add Lucas "Red and Tacky" grease to thicken it up for thick oil needs. 1-STP/1-ATF/2-15w40 for thin.

I've had great luck with just straight 40wt oil as well.

That has actually worked very, very well, for me. Deosn't dry out, if it deos the surface left behind is slick.

danez71
September 8, 2010, 12:34 AM
Full Metal Jacket Quote:
i like to squirt grease into the striker channel until it's packed full!

REAPER4206969 Quote:
So do many LEO's...

Full Metal Jcket Quote:
lol, really? do they then realize what the cause is when their glock won't fire?

REAPER4206969 Quote:
Charleston, North Charleston police to stick with Glock 21 for service pistol
Officials say they've had few problems with gun, despite misfirings reported in other areas

BY GLENN SMITH
The Post and Courier

The Charleston area's two largest police departments say their officers will continue to carry a popular brand of .45-caliber pistol, despite reports of the guns misfiring in other parts of the country.

Police in Los Angeles and Portland, Ore., have barred officers from carrying the Glock Model 21 pistol amid concerns about the weapon's safety. But the pistol remains the standard duty weapon for hundreds of police officers in Charleston and North Charleston.

Police officials in the two Lowcountry cities said they have used these pistols for years without problems and see no reason to make a change.

"We haven't had a bit of problem with it," said interim Charleston police Chief Ned Hethington. "It's a great weapon."

Glock Inc.'s pistols have become the weapon of choice for many Lowcountry law enforcement agencies, most of which use the company's .40-caliber pistols. None of the departments contacted Monday reported problems with Glock guns in their arsenals.

Glock's pistols, made of polymer plastic and steel components, have proven popular with police across the nation because the guns combine power with a lightweight, durable design. More than 7,500 law enforcement agencies, or about 65 percent of the market, use Glocks, according to the company's Web site.

Los Angeles police, however, ordered officers to stop using the Model 21 last week after reports that the .45-caliber weapons misfired dozens of times during training and firearm-qualification sessions, the Los Angeles Times reported. By October, the department had received more than 40 reports of "light strikes," which occur when a firing pin hits a loaded cartridge with insufficient force to discharge a bullet, the newspaper reported.

Last year, Portland's police chief ordered an immediate recall of Model 21 pistols after two separate incidents in which the guns exploded in the hands of officers. Two officers received minor injuries in the incidents, which occurred on the firing range, said Sgt. Brian Schmautz, a spokesman for the department.

Portland police surveyed law enforcement agencies across the country and learned of others that had experienced problems with .45-caliber Glocks, Schmautz said. Portland police stayed with Glock but switched to the company's 9 mm pistols, he said.

Some observers have questioned whether the incidents point to a defect in the guns, while others have suggested that low-quality ammunition or poor maintenance could be to blame.

Representatives from the Austrian arms company, which has U.S. offices in Smyrna, Ga., did not return a call Monday seeking comment on the matter.

North Charleston police started using Glock Model 21 pistols in 1997, and all of the department's nearly 200 uniformed officers carry the weapon, said Spencer Pryor, spokesman for the department. Misfires have not been an issue, he said.

Charleston police use two types of .45-caliber Glocks, the Model 21 and the smaller Model 30. The department has used these pistols since 1993 and now has about 400 of the guns in its arsenal, Hethington said.

"I can't say we haven't had a light strike in there some place, but we really haven't had a problem with it," said Cpl. Craig Farr, range master and a firearms instructor for the department. "It's been a reliable weapon for us."

Contact Glenn Smith at 937-5556 or gsmith@postandcourier.com


REAPER, The article you posted does not substantiate that:
1) "many LEOS" put grease in the striker channel
and
2) that doing so caused the light strikes as documented in the article you posted.

In fact, the article you posted never says what the light strikes were attributed to. And, the article gives no indication as to if its a human issue or an equipment issue.


Could you please provide the tie in to correlate the two?

Full Metal Jacket
September 8, 2010, 01:37 AM
:eek:

REAPER4206969
September 8, 2010, 02:44 AM
Could you please provide the tie in to correlate the two?
A)You must be fun at parties.

and

B)Lubrication, along with powder fouling and brass shavings in the firing pin channel are the #1 cause of weapon related failures to fire and light primmer strikes in Glock's (or any other striker pistol.)

There are other similar stories (that I can't find now) of officers having the same issue. Due, primarily from idiots locking the slide back and hosing the weapon down with WD-40 or similar.

danez71
September 8, 2010, 10:32 AM
A)You must be fun at parties.

and

B)Lubrication, along with powder fouling and brass shavings in the firing pin channel are the #1 cause of weapon related failures to fire and light primmer strikes in Glock's (or any other striker pistol.)

There are other similar stories (that I can't find now) of officers having the same issue. Due, primarily from idiots locking the slide back and hosing the weapon down with WD-40 or similar.

a) Thanks.

b) I realize that as I'd guess quiet a few others do as well. Its not a secret.

The issue is that the text in the story you posted doesnt substantiate what you posted.

However, you posted it in a manner that was intended to substantiate what you said (which it did not).

I'm sure you werent just intending to infur that LEO are incompetent so I figure that you have something factual and meaingful to actually tie together those two scenarios.

Do you have factual/meaningful info to tie those two together or not?

Full Metal Jacket
September 8, 2010, 11:24 AM
The issue is that the text in the story you posted doesnt substantiate what you posted.

sure it did. the LAPD is what he was referencing, which supports the theory that they didn't keep the striker channel clear.

ElToro
September 8, 2010, 12:17 PM
I use wlg the squeze tube kind not spray
on my m1a's and pistols ( no glocks) and oil where each is appropriate. Please remember there is a difference between oil and grease

jon86
September 8, 2010, 12:50 PM
Thanks for all the responses. After reading the responses, I guess I need to pick up white lithium in a squeezy tube. O and when I said I like'em a little wet, I was referring to only the rails on the glock.

danez71
September 8, 2010, 09:59 PM
sure it did. the LAPD is what he was referencing, which supports the theory that they didn't keep the striker channel clear.

uhhh... No it didnt. Not one single bit.

The article referenced that LAPD (and another dept) had problems.

It gave absolutely NO indication of what the problem was attributed to. From the article, its as much of a potential gun defect as anything else.

Basically, a theory, was given with nothing to substantiate it.

A theory with out supporting evidence is nothing more than a guess.

Sam1911
September 8, 2010, 10:28 PM
I'm sure you werent just intending to infur that LEO are incompetent

First off, that word is "infer," however the word you were trying to use is "imply."

(Infer: To conclude or deduce something from evidence and reasoning instead of from explicit statements.

Imply: To strongly suggest something without coming right out and saying it.)


However, neither is relevant to the discussion brought up by the OP -- which I think has been adequately answered.

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