Titanium firing pins for Glock


PDA






fmcdave
September 11, 2010, 12:27 AM
I'm thinking that after 1000s of rounds through my Glock 23C, I'm needing a new firing pin. I have looked at the titanium firing pins offered at my local gun show, but the $125 price has made me wary.

Being a former engineer, I like the idea of titanium (really hard); but I'm wondering if it is really worth it (which is what real engineers think about).

Does anyone have any experience with this?
Dave

If you enjoyed reading about "Titanium firing pins for Glock" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Snarlingiron
September 11, 2010, 12:33 AM
My experience is this:

Glock 19 ~16,000 rounds, original firing pin. In fact it has never had anything replaced at all
Glock 26 ~5,000 rounds, original firing pin. It has never had a part replaced.
Glock 29 ~5,000 rounds, original firing pin. I replaced the recoil spring because I bought it used and the rod looked a bit chewed up, so I replaced it.

Save your money.

Runningman
September 11, 2010, 12:35 AM
Tried a titanium firing pin in a 10/22 years ago. Could not tell a difference in accuracy over stock. Reliability suffered so pulled it out and put the stock one back in.

beeenbag
September 11, 2010, 12:35 AM
my opinion... if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

REAPER4206969
September 11, 2010, 12:39 AM
Not for serious use. They are prone to breakage and cause FTFire.

The Lone Haranguer
September 11, 2010, 01:12 AM
$125?!? :what: That could buy a really nice holster (or even a complete carry rig), ~300 rounds of ammo, or a whole lot of things more useful than a titanium firing pin.

skipsan
September 11, 2010, 01:16 AM
Titanium firing pins have been adopted by several 1911 manufacturers because in combination with heavier firing pin return springs, pistols so-equipped are able to pass the California drop test. I believe that Springfield was the first major manufacturer to adopt Ti, and others, but not all have followed suit. The FBI uses the Ti firing pin in their SA 1911 (Pro Model) pistols, so I think it would be incorrect to say that a properly designed and manufactured Ti firing pin somehow represents an inferior design.

All that said, Springfield sells their titanium firing pins as spare parts for
$12 for the smaller diameter pin, and $16 for the larger diameter (0.090") pin used on the FBI 1911s. The 1911 Ti pin is probably a little less expensive to manufacture given that it has a round cross section, but there's no way, in my opinion, that anything close to $125 could be justfied for a Glock fp. I also don't think the lower weight and inertia that a Ti pin would offer, would make a twit's worth of difference in a Glock. The 1911 is an entirely different animal.

Full Metal Jacket
September 11, 2010, 02:23 AM
Not for serious use. They are prone to breakage and cause FTFire.

this. don't waste your money.

even if they do indeed decrease lock time, you can't tell any difference.

Onmilo
September 11, 2010, 10:22 AM
Just remember that titanium burns.

Pierce a primer with a Ti pin and you will likely find it welded to the firing pin tunnel afterward.

Manco
September 11, 2010, 10:50 AM
I'm thinking that after 1000s of rounds through my Glock 23C, I'm needing a new firing pin.

How many thousands? You're far more likely to need to preemptively replace various springs than the firing pin after a certain number of shots, especially in a Glock (which have strong stock firing pins).

Being a former engineer, I like the idea of titanium (really hard); but I'm wondering if it is really worth it (which is what real engineers think about).

Did your work involve materials? Titanium may have great strength for its weight, but not necessarily for its volume. While titanium has many advantages when used as a structural material, particularly in aircraft and spacecraft, steel is generally better suited for applications such as firing pins, for which volume is limited and forces are highly concentrated (that's why titanium and aluminum alloys are generally used in aircraft structures, while steel is used in the landing gear, for example). Titanium allows for light firing pins, but not strong ones in comparison to steel. In a Glock, I would definitely stick with steel firing pins from the factory.

ET
September 11, 2010, 11:34 AM
my opinion... if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Couldn't have said it any better!

The Lone Haranguer
September 11, 2010, 03:12 PM
I would think a striker type (powered only by the spring) firing pin would need some weight to it in order to ensure a positive, deep primer strike. :confused: The mechanism and force involved is different from being struck by a hammer.

leadcounsel
September 11, 2010, 03:53 PM
That's 25% of the cost of a NEW Glock!!! Heck no!

I've shot thousands of rounds through my Glocks and never had to replace anything...

rcmodel
September 11, 2010, 04:02 PM
A 1,000 rounds, and you think the FP needs to be replaced?
Shirley, you jest!

Don't waste your money!!!!!
The stock Glock firing pin will very likely still be working well after you are.

Springs are the only thing that will eventually need replacement, but certainly not at 1,000 rounds, or even several times that.

My Model 23 is 15 years old and nothing has needed replacement yet except the ammo shot through it.

rc

possum
September 11, 2010, 06:15 PM
i agree if it isn't broke don't fix it. In my experience glocks run longer stock that most people that own them will. (of course a set of sights that aren't plastic are nice) of course change the recoil spring when it is needed, other than that i wouldn't worry about anything else unless there is a problem. when you reach 100k i might think about an overhaul.

Zerodefect
September 11, 2010, 07:45 PM
The gun show ti FP's are kinda lame.

But the Glockworx lightened and polished strikers work very well. They ar intended for Glocks with lower power striker springs for a lighter trigger pull. Also I swear the polished striker made for a smoother trigger take up.

The maritime spring cups don't seem to like the GW strikers.

If your using standard striker springs and stock trigger parts, then stick with the stock FP. The Glock FP is a quality part and should last nearly forever.

if you want to tune your Glock start with recoil rods (for weight), connectors, FP safety spring, trigger spring etc. You can go super light with all of those settings and IME still be safe. But playing with the striker spring is often pushing it just a little too far. The striker spring is the last thing that should be modded IMO, and be careful!

fmcdave
September 11, 2010, 10:42 PM
Thanks to all. I am extremely impressed with the responses. I'm thinking I am going to save my money...work on my reloader primer seating and other things.
Thanks to all!

PO2Hammer
September 11, 2010, 11:02 PM
Just remember that titanium burns.

Pierce a primer with a Ti pin and you will likely find it welded to the firing pin tunnel afterward.
I don't think that's anything to worry about, it would have to reach over 2,000 degrees.

If you enjoyed reading about "Titanium firing pins for Glock" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!