7x57 Hunter, need info


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ScramasaxDurango
September 15, 2010, 03:30 AM
I'm after mule deer, whitetails, hogs, Russian boar, and maybe other occasional critters depending on what's going on.

Is the 7x57 a good round for most animals? What all is it good for? What other bullets is it comparable to/similar to? I know the Boers used the 7x57 back in the day to great effect, but somebody told me that the American-made ammunition is less powerful.

Finally, how does the old 7x57mm compare with other rounds like the 8mm Mauser, .300 Winchester Mag, .30-06, 7.62x54R, .308, etc.?

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huntershooter
September 15, 2010, 04:43 AM
Loaded to it's potential (for modern bolt guns) a 7X57 is comparable to the 7mm/.308.
Jack O'Conner used one to great effect back in the day, as did "Karamojo" Bell-famous ivory hunter that allegedly used the 7X57 with 175 gr. solids to shoot a few hundred Elephants.
Great cartridge with an interesting history.
However, if you don't handload not a good way to go-try the 7mm/.308 instead.
You will not find modern/hi pressure 7X57 at Wallyworld in Billings MT. or Red River N.M.

Clipper
September 15, 2010, 08:19 AM
Gimme a break...7X57 is indeed loaded down in American ammo, mostly because there are a lot of Spanish Mausers around that would be pounded bad by the European-level stuff. However, if you have something else, or something newer, order up some Sellier & Beloit or Graff & Sons stuff and have fun. Anyway, the American made stuff has been killing big game for a long time too.

ScramasaxDurango
September 16, 2010, 02:22 AM
Okay thanks guys, I appreciate it

heeler
September 16, 2010, 08:29 AM
You might not find 7x57 ammo in Billings or Red River N.M. but every time I walk into an Academy sports store in Houston Texas they always have several boxes of the stuff.
Honestly I think you might have more issues finding 7mm-08 ammo over the 7x57.

Art Eatman
September 16, 2010, 09:00 AM
Back around the first of September, I stopped in at almost every gun store between Alpine, Texas, and Pueblo, Colorado--and three WalMarts. They all had 7mm08.

US 7mm ammo is loaded to 40,000 psi on account of the single-lug bolt guns still around. In a modern two-lug gun, loading to 50,000 psi is plenty safe.

But the old 7mm will take any animal on the OP list. Just don't try and play Ma Bell and reach way out there--until you take up handloading...

jimmyraythomason
September 16, 2010, 09:45 AM
I use Hornady Light Magnums and Prvi Partisan as well as Sellor and Belloit ammo in my 7x57s. I also use Remington Core-Lokt and Federal Classic ammo for whitetail(they don't seem to know that the ammo is underloaded). If I need more velocity or range there is my .280 Remington or 7mmRem.mag.to take up the slack.

Jim Watson
September 16, 2010, 09:49 AM
Hey, Art, which "single lug" 7mm are we talking about here?

I know it is usual to run down the various Spanish and Latin American rifles, but they still have two locking lugs like every Mauser since 1891.

Art Eatman
September 16, 2010, 05:37 PM
Lordy, Jim, I dunno. But the tort liability thing for ammo makers is that if there's one such critter out there, they worry. Same deal for .45-70, since there are still original Trapdoors in occasional use--so "basic .45-70" ammo is still way down-loaded except by the specialty folks who have all manner of warnings on the box.

I don't remember which brand or model of Latin Mauser I had for a brief while, some years back, but it was indeed a single-lug affair...

Captcurt
September 16, 2010, 06:20 PM
Lordy, Jim, I dunno. But the tort liability thing for ammo makers is that if there's one such critter out there, they worry. Same deal for .45-70, since there are still original Trapdoors in occasional use--so "basic .45-70" ammo is still way down-loaded except by the specialty folks who have all manner of warnings on the box.

I don't remember which brand or model of Latin Mauser I had for a brief while, some years back, but it was indeed a single-lug affair...
The Spanish M93 and the small ring Mexican/Chilean M95 Mausers had the single locking lugs. These were designed for up to 45,000 p.s.i.. Modern rifles and Mausers after 98 can handle full loads.

I wouldn't feel undergunned with a 7X57 when after anything up to and including elk. I would rather have my 300WSM for elk, but the 7 would work with the proper bullet and bullet placement. 140 gr will work for any whitetail, muley or pronghorn that you are apt to run into..

Grey Morel
September 16, 2010, 07:39 PM
In reality, the 'weak' factory loads will easily take everything on your list. Don't let the ERRORNET convince you otherwise.

No worries. Get out and shoot! :D

Jefferson Herb
September 17, 2010, 01:00 PM
Sometimes we have to fib and say we want to buy a box of ammo "for My Wife".
In all reality,a 175gr rn will work on anything,and less velocity is less ruined meat.[Why is the 45-70 still going?] I still have my Highschool built 7mmm mau-7x57-275Rigby in a french walnut rollover stockwith it's old 1-8 twist barrel,and it does just fine.[Maybe I should use it sometime] We all find an excuse to buy a new gun,when that old mauser worked just fine[w/2-7 weaver for 50.00]

41magsnub
September 17, 2010, 01:36 PM
I've found that the 175gr SP factory loads from Federal do not expand much if at all in deer sized critters out of my M77. I haven't lost or even had to track a one shot with it so I guess it is working.. however I'd feel better if it would mushroom some. I've obviously never recovered a bullet to totally prove or disprove this since it transits the animal completely at every angle with the same little entrance and exit wound.

One spectacularly bad shot, when a good sized muley doe turned just as I fired, showed some good penetration. The bullet transited the entire length of the animal, entering through the base of the neck and exiting out its rear end. No meat was lost, the bullet stayed nice and centered, it didn't rupture the gut sack where meat contamination was a problem.

H&Hhunter
September 17, 2010, 03:10 PM
The number of lugs ain't the issue as far as I know with the 7x57 (.275 Rigby) it's an issue of a small ring vs a large ring mauser action. The small ring mausers won't take to much high pressure stuff.

But the ol 7 mauser with a heavy for caliber bullet will kill anything on your list they do like to penetrate. As Mr Bell found out.

usmccpl
September 18, 2010, 01:52 PM
My wife's Grandpa uses a 7x57 every year for Mulies and Elk. In the time Ive know him he never failed to bring home one of each every year with a one shot kill. Cant say for sure what brand of ammo he uses but I do know its factory loads as he is against reloading.

Jim Watson
September 18, 2010, 02:11 PM
I once saw at a gun show a real .275 Rigby. A very handsome rifle indeed. The case was a nicer piece of workmanship than a lot of rifles you see now.
The truly interesting part was the accompanying letter from W.D.M. Bell inquiring whether the rifling twist for the Rigby 145 grain semi-spitzer was adequate for the 175 gr roundnose that he depended on. Pity they didn't have the reply.

I have no doubt that the '98 Mauser with thicker and better metal and a "safety lug" on the bolt is a stronger gun than the '93-'95 Spanish Mausers. But I wonder at the lug count in this thread. Every '91, '93, '94, '95, and '96 small ring Mauser I have ever seen had two front locking lugs. I will take some convincing to believe in a 7x57 with one locking lug.

Art Eatman
September 19, 2010, 11:35 AM
Jim, I had one for a brief while. (Indian-giver "buddy" of my wife's. Long BS story.) I don't recall the brand, but it was definitely a 7x57. Still have a half a box of ammo. :)

jimmyraythomason
September 19, 2010, 02:27 PM
Sometimes we have to fib and say we want to buy a box of ammo "for My Wife".
No,seriously,it really IS my wife's 7x57!!!!!:)

Leaky Waders
September 19, 2010, 03:00 PM
When I was looking for an allaround hunting rifle I ended up with the 7mm08. From what I understand, Basically a modernized 7x57. I think the 7mm08 can be placed ina true short action while the 7x57 needs a little longer action (if I recall correctly). So, if you reload, you have more room in the 7x57 for overall length due to the action length.

Basically I'd find the rifle platform that you like and see what they chamber it in - 7x57 or 7mm08.

Vlad357
September 20, 2010, 09:46 AM
My first deer rifle was an old Mauser 7x57 that I "sporterized". It killed quite a few deer just fine. I have a bunch of other rifles now, but when it comes to rifle season this year I think I am taking my "new" 91/30 Mosin, without the bayonet!

Old Granddad
October 1, 2010, 11:18 PM
Odd. I have an M93 Spanish Mauser ("sporterized"--I really HATE that word) and it sho' 'nuff has two front locking lugs. What it lacks, compared to the M98, is the third "safety" locking lug at the rear, which actually makes no contact unless the front lugs fail. Shoots just fine, too, using Remington "downloaded" factory ammo with 140 gr. Core-Lokts. A reliable old freezer filler.

jimmyraythomason
October 2, 2010, 09:55 AM
("sporterized"--I really HATE that word) "Sporterized'' and ''customized'' are both accurate descriptions of such firearms. It is the word ''Bubba'ed'' that I find not only offensive but inaccurate as well. Usually used by ''purists'' or collectors in a derogatory manner. While ''Customized'' can apply to anything,''sporterized'' applies to anything changed from a non-sporting use to a sporting use. Calling a military surplus rifle that has been modified from a military use to a sporting one (target,hunting) a "sporterized milsurp'' is not only accurate but also non-offensive as well.

schnarrgj
October 3, 2010, 10:13 PM
I have two Spanish M93's and a Chilean 95. Needless to say, they all have two lugs.

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