shotshell reloading for cf pistols


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Nicodemus38
September 24, 2010, 12:54 AM
when i look at articles on loading shotshells for center fire revolvers, the wisdom and guide is always

look at the reloading data for the cartridge you want to load shot in, select the weight of shot you want to use, scroll to that weigh tlisting in your cartridge and just use the starting load for that powder.

ie you want to throw 200 grains of shot, the manual says 5 grains for the brand x powder you have, so you simply put the powder in the primed case, shakeit so its settled down, put a powder wad directly on top of the powder, then pour your shot in and then put an over shot card in.

and thats your shot shell.

however all articles say its safe to do that, but yet they tell me that if i put the powder in the case, then a powder wad, and then put a 200 grain cast bullet seated on the over powder wad, it would blow my gun up.

can you explain the reasoning for that?

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GP100man
September 24, 2010, 01:11 AM
First off, Who said it ????

Second , think what modern smokless powder does it burns to expand & fill the case with pressure .

I think a card will make no difference except to make a more consistent burn on case position sensitive powders !!!!

I`ve shot many rounds of shotshells made with cards in 38/357& 44 !!!

http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx110/GP100man/102_0228-1.jpg

rcmodel
September 24, 2010, 02:21 PM
and then put a 200 grain cast bullet seated on the over powder wad, it would blow my gun up. I have never heard that said by anyone.

Lots of folks use over-powder wads in black-powder rifle calibers when loading smokeless powder. Also grease wads, etc.

rc

Rico567
September 24, 2010, 02:54 PM
I've used the Speer shot capsules, which I notice are also available for .45 Colt. The only data, given in one of my old Speer manuals, is using Unique. The things actually work pretty well....

Nicodemus38
September 24, 2010, 11:34 PM
ive been looking for along time at that as a way to get around the powder position dilemma with 45 colt. so when i found a few articles on loading shotshells i got the idea to simply put the powder in, throw in a powder card and then seat a bullet on top of that to minimize double charges, etc.

however in one reloading magazine this year they did an article on loading double round balls in pistol cases and they warned about it not being safe to load a regular solid bullet that close to the powder. as in other articles ive seen online, it was suggested that the solid slug loaded that close would create some sort of overpressure similar to loading a bp cartridge with an air gap in it.

so i have to ask for some kind of clarification. although some roundball gallery loads for 45 colt are loaded extremely deep in the case in comparison to a regular conical in the same weight class.

rcmodel
September 25, 2010, 12:42 PM
and they warned about it not being safe to load a regular solid bullet that close to the powder.That is entirely a factor of the type & amount of powder you used in the load.

Many safe handgun loads result in a charge with the base of the bullet compressing the powder.
This is especially true with Magnum revolver calibers using slow burning powder, as well as small capacity auto pistol calibers using medium speed powder.

On the otherhand, two round balls simply cannot weigh as much as a bullet of the same caliber, so stuffing a bullet down on a powder charge intended for two balls would surely result in an over-pressure load.

rc

Nicodemus38
September 25, 2010, 10:27 PM
so say i get a 38 special and want to load a 148 grain double ended wadcutter like a shotgun slug, powder-wad-bullet just like that, is that going to blow a gun up?

get the idea?

Randy1911
September 26, 2010, 06:08 AM
I have always used the Speer capsules with great sucess. Just load the capsule with shot and use the data in the speer manual. They work great. They are available in 38/357, 44 mag/spl. and 45 Colt. I have killed many a snake with them.

rcmodel
September 26, 2010, 12:20 PM
want to load a 148 grain double ended wadcutter like a shotgun slug, powder-wad-bullet just like that, is that going to blow a gun up?Probably not, but there is absolutely no reason to use a wad with a .38 Spl wadcutter bullet in the first place.

148 grain wad & 2.7 grains of Bullseye powder have won enough match hardware over the last 75 years to fill the Super-Dome.

Without card wads being used, or necessary for match winning accuracy.

rc

oneounceload
September 26, 2010, 06:19 PM
The CCI capsules have the loading data on the box - they work well for a distance of 5-7 FEET, but they reload easy enough

R.Clem
September 26, 2010, 09:50 PM
I have been loading shot shells for my .357's and .44 mags for a lot of years, they started out to be rat and mice killers, then graduated to snake killers as well.
For the .357, I use regular cases loaded with 3.0 grains of Unique and a wad made from open cell styrofoam, (they look like an earplug with both ends square) and a 1/4 oz or so of shot. Load the same as you would a slug load with the exception of the wad going over the powder and using loose shot instead of a slug. The over shot card used to be a gas check, when they were cheaper than dirt, now it is a piece of Lexon punched out with a .375 hollow punch, that is 3/8", and you will need a stem to fit into your crimp die to push the shot/over shot card down to get it crimped in place. These will kill a sparrow at 20 feet with out a problem, so be aware of what is behind your target.
The .44's are a different story, my cases are made from either .303 British or .30-40 Krag cases trimmed to the length of the cylinder, (they are tapered until you fire them the first time), some cases may have to have the rims machined thinner to fit into the revolver. Next, your favorite non magnum primer, 9 grains of Unique, the same wad I mentioned earlier, then a full 1/2 oz or more of shot, (the more happens after firing, then it is closer to 3/4 oz). Now the fun stuff, I use a .308 Winchester sizing die to crimp the mouth over the punched (.4375, 7/16") Lexon shot cover, and you need to make up a punch to fit the die that will allow for compression as well as not interfere with the crimp (a 1/4" NF allen head bolt works) which takes place at the shoulder of the die. These will kill out past 30', use the same caution as you would with a slug.
I'll try to answer questions if anyone is interested.
The down side to shooting unprotected shot in a handgun is "leading", you better plan on buying a Hoppe's lead remover and using it. DO NOT UNDER AN CIRCUMSTANCES FIRE A SLUG AFTER YOU HAVE FIRED A SHOT LOAD. It will overpressure your gun, maybe not to the point of blowing it up, but the primer will be so flat you will wonder what happened. I know from past experience, believe it.

Ray

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