Lyman Tumbling Media


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viking499
September 26, 2010, 03:28 PM
What is the difference in the Lyman tumbling media? What color or name is best for what particular use?

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rcmodel
September 26, 2010, 03:43 PM
The green is walnut for removing gunk & corrosion fairly quickly.

The Red is red rouge treated softer corn-cob for final finish.

The Brown is untreated corn-cob and you add your own polishing compound to it.

I bought the green a couple of years ago, and I really don't like it much.
It is too course and gets in flash-holes at about a 90% rate.

rc

GW Staar
September 26, 2010, 05:10 PM
Nothing to add to RC's post except that there are cheaper and better options for media. I use Corn Cob bought in bulk from Graingers. the 20-40 grind is small enough to never stop up flash holes. I split an order with a friend, and cost was $12.50 a piece. This is 40 lbs worth...so 20 lbs a piece. Hard to beat that price, especially if you have a Graingers close enough to drive to. If you order it "will call" there is no shipping. (I use Dillon's polish, or just Blue Magic at Auto Zone for compound.) Left for 12 hours I have mirror brass. I use Lyman's 2500 tumbler.

Hondo 60
September 26, 2010, 05:57 PM
http://www.drillspot.com/products/521055/econoline_526040g-40_40_lbs_blast_media

This is for Graingers media as mentioned by GW Staar. no shipping charge.

Gryffydd
September 26, 2010, 06:35 PM
I bought the green a couple of years ago, and I really don't like it much.
It is too course and gets in flash-holes at about a 90% rate.
Yup. It's like those things have flash-hole homing systems. It also doesn't do a terribly good job.
http://www.drillspot.com/products/52...bs_blast_media

This is for Graingers media as mentioned by GW Staar. no shipping charge.
I was actually just googling for cheap tumbling media and came across a thread on the 1911 forums for that same deal and ordered some. $22 for 40# with free shipping is a pretty good deal. Quite a bit cheaper than buying it from Grainger even.

Muttt
September 26, 2010, 08:34 PM
I really like the red stuff in the plastic jugs. It makes the brass nice and shiny and it feels slick when you handle it.

ave8er
September 26, 2010, 09:02 PM
ok stupid question number 1.... brand new to reloading (so new all I have is brass) would it be better to tumble your brass before you knock the primers out so the media you are using to clean the brass would not get into the primer pockets? Don't flame me.... I am just asking and I know very little...

DANNY-L
September 26, 2010, 09:48 PM
I tumble my brass before resizing for that reason and I dont like putting dirty cases in my dies.

ranger335v
September 26, 2010, 09:56 PM
I use the finest grit blasting corn cob I could find to clean my cases, no polish. I just can't get excited about plasticky looking glittery brass.

I decap with a universal depriming die, tumble, lube, size, in that order. Any bits stuck in the flash holes gets punched out during sizing but the fine grit stuff I use rarely sticks anyway.

I don't think there's enough difference ineffect between cob and nut to make a difference but some folks use a 50:50 mix of the two. Guess they want to make sure they get it right?

tac_driver
September 26, 2010, 10:39 PM
lizard litter (fine crushed walnut) from petsmart I tumble 20 minutes before i size cases then punch out the primers and tumble 20 minutes again to clean the primer pockets. Never have a problem with clogged primer pockets. also use used dryer sheets cut into 1" strips to keep the media lasting longer. I change it about every 6 months.

Gryffydd
September 26, 2010, 11:43 PM
I change it about every 6 months
The important bit is missing. How much do you shoot in a month?

I just can't get excited about plasticky looking glittery brass.
Maybe I'm alone here, but I've never seen glittery plastic before.

GW Staar
September 27, 2010, 12:05 AM
http://www.drillspot.com/products/521055/econoline_526040g-40_40_lbs_blast_media

This is for Graingers media as mentioned by GW Staar. no shipping charge.

Drillspot isn't Graingers, but they obviously sell the same product (Econoline) and for a few bucks cheaper, even!

The other nice thing is you obviously don't need a Grainger Store nearby to be free shipping....that's a plus too.

Thanks for the link!

Point is do you want 6# for $14.80 (Lyman plain corncob) or 40# for $22? ($2.46/lb. vs. $.55/lb) and it works better, if you choose to remove primers first.

Gryffydd
September 27, 2010, 12:42 AM
Drillspot isn't Graingers, but they obviously sell the same product (Econoline) and for a few bucks cheaper, even!

One user on 1911forum.com said his Drillspot order was drop shipped by Grainger.

Iron Sight
September 27, 2010, 11:24 AM
Walnut media and Flitz for me

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=816895

I didnt like the red lyman, it got all over everything.

Hondo 60
September 27, 2010, 01:17 PM
While drill spot & Grainger may not be the same, when I ordered, via drillspot.com, the invoice did say Grainger on it.

tac_driver
September 27, 2010, 02:43 PM
Between 800 t0 1000 rounds a month.

ranger335v
September 27, 2010, 03:05 PM
"Maybe I'm alone here, but I've never seen glittery plastic before."

Yeah, you have. A bunch of it. Just glittery plastic, imitation stuff tho.

Lots of automotive trim "chrome" is just plated plastic, lots of kids toys and electonic stuff too, etc. I don't need that look on my ammo.

Tilos
September 27, 2010, 03:18 PM
For me:
Shiny brass is easier to see when picking range mushrooms:D
If it ain't shiny...it ain't mine:)

noylj
September 27, 2010, 05:39 PM
Every one has to decide just how clean they need their brass to be.
I used walnut and found that it produced a LOT of dust (great for making a walnut stain) and the dust packed into the brass—meaning I had to pick it all out by hand.
I use 20/40 corn cob and the brass comes out shinier than I need. Since I decap first, there is an occasional fleck of media (sort of a sliver/straw stalk) that is easily knocked out, blown out, or left in for the decapping pin to knock it out.
The primer pockets come out cleaner, though I don't really care about that.
I am completely content and just wonder about the time and money some people spend getting shiny brass.

Maj Dad
September 27, 2010, 06:07 PM
I like the 20/40 versus the 14/20 - doesn't get stuck in the flash holes. I add polish (either Dillon or Midway) to some if I want that glittery plasticky look :rolleyes: but mostly I leave it as is. Walnut is a little better for cleaning up dirty stuff and I tend to use it for first tumble, then polish if the mood strikes me. I have bought two 40 lb bags from Drillspot and both were drop shipped from Grainger: marked as sold to Drillspot, delivery address was mine. $22 for 40 lbs, free shipping and got here in 2 days (yep - 2 days) from order to delivery. Hard to beat... :cool:

Tilos
September 27, 2010, 07:43 PM
noyli said;
"I am completely content and just wonder about the time and money some people spend getting shiny brass."

I don't think "some people" spend any more time or money than you do.
Maybe just more time in the tumbler which costs near nothing, using the same "turn it on and walk away" methods as you:D
I do know adding Nu Finish car wax, while tumbling, greatly reduces the effort needed to resize pistol brass for me.
And who here doesn't have some liquid car wax, drying up, in the garage somewhere?
Give it a try...you don't have to tell anyone:uhoh:

I do think wearing white cotton gloves while loading to avoid brass tarnishing would qualify as too much time and money though:what:
Does this thread qualify as the weekly tumbling thread?
...I hope so:rolleyes:
YMMV

turbo
September 27, 2010, 07:57 PM
I do a little mixing and adding with the three mediums, only because i didn't know which would work best. These are some great ideas you guys are putting out.:)

GW Staar
September 28, 2010, 12:33 PM
I am completely content and just wonder about the time and money some people spend getting shiny brass.

Had to smile at that one. Not that I think you're funny. Just that I don't spend much money or time at it...except for the price of the Lyman Turbo 2500 that I bought on sale at Midway 2 years ago. Before that for 36 years or so, I made ugly reloads...and I never was completely content.;)

Finally, I am completely content in buying a 3 year supply of corncob from Graingers, for $22 to $25.. And I'm also completely content to start a batch tumbling before I get in the shower in the morning, knowing that it's making shiny brass for me all day while I'm at work....and I'm also perfectly content in reloading that shiny clean brass in the evening. Oh, and I like it when people at the range say, "those are reloads???" :)

BTW, I stopped tumbler crawling, by buying the non-slip rubber shelf liner at Walmart. Works really well...used to have to put the tumbler on the floor...now I don't have to give it a thought.

ranger335v
September 28, 2010, 08:36 PM
"Oh, and I like it when people at the range say, "those are reloads???""

Not that it matters but I suspect that's 95% of why some people want 'plasticy' looking brass. ;)

TeamPrecisionIT
September 28, 2010, 08:57 PM
I just tumble them because it makes it easier to spot issues with the cases. A little crack/split could go unnoticed if you have brass that is filled with firing debris. So I tumble them for an hour or two to get them clean. Not really a lot of work or money to do it. Maybe one less box of primers or 1lb of powder being traded in the name of safety every six months. Is that really a big deal?

Damian

Gryffydd
September 28, 2010, 09:15 PM
Wow, the order I put in with Drillspot on Sunday showed up today (Tuesday).

viking499
September 28, 2010, 09:21 PM
I placed an order today. Will be here by the end of the week.

Seedtick
September 28, 2010, 10:05 PM
Wow, the order I put in with Drillspot on Sunday showed up today (Tuesday).

+1
Me too.

Now if Harbor Freight would just run this walnut (http://www.harborfreight.com/25-lbs-fine-grade-walnut-shell-blast-media-92155.html) on sale I'll be set.
They had the coarse grind on sale for $15 a couple of weeks ago.

ST

:)

ole farmerbuck
September 28, 2010, 10:28 PM
I found that by putting some Meguiars Swirl Remover in even the coarse media, it will make the baddest of the bad looking brass look great in a couple of hours. Best stuff i've ever used.

GW Staar
September 29, 2010, 01:07 AM
I do a little mixing and adding with the three mediums, only because i didn't know which would work best. These are some great ideas you guys are putting out.:)

There's really no point in mixing walnut with corncobb. Here's why. Walnut is courser. Courser cleans better and cuts faster, which is good for really tarnished brass. Not unlike course sandpaper, the brass finish is ok, but not particularly glossy. The scratches made are too rough for that.

Corncobb, is like very smooth sandpaper. Like the sandpaper it'll clean the tarnish off pretty good, but it takes longer. Since its smoother, a smooth shiny finish is the result....unless you add walnut. With walnut added the finish won't be any smoother or shinier than Walnut by itself can make, because the walnut is harder and scratches deeper.

Corncobb, being softer, scratches shallower, as does really fine sanpaper, but it won't cut fast, unless you add some polishing compound to it, like Dillon polish, Flitz, or Blue Magic. By the same token, the finer the polishing compound the shinier the finish....Meguirs Swirl Remover is about a fine as polish gets. It will cut slower but polishes brighter.

A decent plan would be to tumble a few hours with walnut if you have really tarnished brass, then polish it up with the corncobb spiked with polishing compound. If the brass isn't so bad skip the walnut and just clean and polish with spiked corn cobb. Keep in mind that so far we have only talked about initial cleaning and polishing. Then you size (and deprime if you haven't already done that with a universal depriming die).

Following that size/deprime operation, just plain unspiked corncobb is best to remove lube from your resized brass. 30 to 45 minutes does it for me, and with 20/40 grit corncobb, no flash holes get clogged.


....Just glittery plastic, imitation stuff tho.

Lots of automotive trim "chrome" is just plated plastic, lots of kids toys and electonic stuff too, etc. I don't need that look on my ammo.

Ranger can make all the tarnished reloads he wants, but I much prefer a professional looking product. And what are we "imitating"....nothing! Polished brass, sir, is the real thing! Do I do it 95% to impress at the range? No, that is just the result as I try to impress me. If my ammo looks better...I feel better. If I feel better I shoot better. It's too bad, we can't indulge ourselves, without always having somebody...attempt to rain on the parade.

Hondo 60
September 29, 2010, 11:51 AM
I use the 20/40 corn cob & get a lot of dust on the cover of my tumbler. So it stays out in the garage w/ the door open while tumbling.

Then I use my shop vac to vacuum off the cover before dumping it into the separator.
If the brass is really sooty I use a bit of Cabela's polish in the mix.

I usually run it 3-4 hrs, but sometimes I forget & runs a lot longer. My brass doesn't look "plasticky" it just looks like new factory stuff (especially when I forget it overnight). :D

I've tried the walnut & found it didn't really clean any better than corn cob & I'm used to the shinier look, so I ended up re-tumbling with corn cob anyway.
I'm sure for some combinations of powders & bullets the walnut works better, but it just didn't seem to help me any.

ole farmerbuck
September 29, 2010, 09:32 PM
Meguirs Swirl Remover is about a fine as polish gets. It will cut slower but polishes brighter.



That is right but I'm not skimpy with it and believe me, it works great.

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