Intimidating Takedowns


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Yo Mama
September 28, 2010, 12:17 PM
What gun that you own scares you to fully strip?

For me, Keltec pf9, and Taurus pt145. My 1911s are easy now.

I figure the only way to take these fully down requires a bit more confidence than I have in me.

How about you?

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Robert
September 28, 2010, 12:25 PM
None. All of mine are easy to tear down and put back together, at least for me.

essayons21
September 28, 2010, 12:26 PM
Ma Duece

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q177/collingscb/IMG_0694.jpg
Field stripped, which isn't too bad. Complete takedown is a PITA

oh wait, that I own...

Probably my S&W 686. Once the side plate comes off it looks like the inside of a clock.

Or really any gun with a really nice finish.

shotgunjoel
September 28, 2010, 12:28 PM
essayons21, that cleaning rod is hilarious. How many pieces is that!?

DasFriek
September 28, 2010, 12:28 PM
Ruger MKIII 22/45 was a nightmare when i first got it.
My 1911 took 8 hours to put put back together my first tear down, Now i can do it in less than 2 minutes.
All of them become easy with practice.

burley
September 28, 2010, 12:29 PM
I have yet to bust down a CZ decocker. It shouldn't be that bad though. I did my P 22 and that was an experience. You don't get the relation and how small all those parts are untill they're spread on a table and you start to doubt yourself.

essayons21
September 28, 2010, 12:39 PM
essayons21, that cleaning rod is hilarious. How many pieces is that!?

Never really counted, but at least enough for a 45" barrel.

FWIW, I personally hate taking down Mk19s more, if only for the damage to my knuckles that occurs when reinstalling the bolt. I still have scars from "Mk19 thumb"

Guy de Loimbard
September 28, 2010, 12:48 PM
I don't like Ruger Mk III's. You shouldn't have to have a rubber mallet to take a gun apart.

cleardiddion
September 28, 2010, 12:52 PM
Winchester 1894
Ruger 10/22 trigger group. This one was a PITA. First time I took it apart all the pieces and springs started shooting off in all directions.
Remington 522r.

FLAvalanche
September 28, 2010, 01:28 PM
I still have scars from "Mk19 thumb"

Makes two of us. And let's not forget all those damn washers inside the sear....

Look at the bright side. Not to many people on the earth know what an ogive plunger is.

Broken11b
September 28, 2010, 01:33 PM
Ahhh... hate the MK 19 disassembly, makes the M2 look like a dream.

Of the stuff I own, the Mosin-Nagant has the toughest bolt take down, everything else is smooth.

LiquidTension
September 28, 2010, 01:39 PM
I had to take the action of a Marlin 60 to a gunsmith once. I delivered the parts in a bag. Never again.

armoredman
September 28, 2010, 01:46 PM
I saw the title, and thought "lady wrestlers"...but I digress. Ruger 22 pistols always were as ain to me. Ma Duece never bothered me back in the day, just trying not to get impaled by the main spring. Bolt was easy. M-60, I hated that thing, too many parts you could install upside down and backwards...can't remember now what they were, last time I touched either one was 21 years ago. :)

mustang_steve
September 28, 2010, 05:32 PM
Yep, a Marlin 60 can be a bit fun to work on....my first time working on a rifle was doing the trigger job on mine. Took me 10 mins to get it apart, 3 hours to figure out what I was doing, an hour to do the work, an hour to get it all back together.

Somewhere in there was about 20 bucks worth of cuss words (at a nickle a word).

JohnD13
September 28, 2010, 06:11 PM
A Broomhandle Mauser. It was a gift, no manual with it, but that didn't stop me! Taking it down was interesting, putting it back together was half the night. I got a manual right after. They are great old pistols, just for people that like jigsaw puzzles.

Shadow 7D
September 28, 2010, 06:31 PM
The 240 and m249 are 'fun' too. Personally to pieces, the MKIII and a CZ83

The 83 has a nasty habit, the sear spring leg goes to the hammer block, and if you don't get it in the little groove, you get all those nasty side effects of a loose sear... Yeah, there is a reason they have the tech number and the fact that factory reassembly is $70 stickied over on surplusrilfe

Vyacheslav
September 28, 2010, 06:32 PM
i had an SKS, takedown was simple but getting that trigger group back in was hell

Derek Zeanah
September 28, 2010, 06:36 PM
I never minded the M60 - used to be the fastest in my platoon with it.

I agree on the Ma Deuce though. Never got it together correctly on the first try.

jakk280rem
September 28, 2010, 06:57 PM
i'll second, or third, or whatever the ruger mk series. i took a mkii in on trade. it was crispy inside. wall to wall bullet lube, unburnt powder, bullet plating, old lube, and dead bugs. all the way apart, cleaned, and back together was a four hour task.

JohnBiltz
September 28, 2010, 07:10 PM
Its not so much about taking it apart as putting it back together with me.

TeamPrecisionIT
September 28, 2010, 07:21 PM
The Luger P08 Artillery Model and P22 are the biggest pain's I have. My other are all real simple or I wouldn't own them. Part of my requirement is being able to detail strip it myself with less than three tools - light hammer, punch and maybe a screwdriver if necessary for detail stripping.

Damian

essayons21
September 28, 2010, 07:23 PM
I've found my Luger to be a challenge at first as well. Is the takedown/assembly procedure for the Artillery model different from the standard model?

Rogue6
September 28, 2010, 07:53 PM
My Luger's the one for me, too. Although I have to admit I haven't yet tried to disassemble my new-to-me 98k. There's some weird hole in the butt that you're supposed to use to take the bolt - I have no idea how that works.

Shadow 7D
September 28, 2010, 09:39 PM
Actually, I would like to change my above, the MK3 for take down, and the CZ for reassembly.

Rusty Shackleford
September 28, 2010, 09:45 PM
Just thought this would be the opportune time for a quick story...

One time, when I was about 12 years old, my neighbor and I were cleaning our paintball guns. I had detail stripped mine before and had a really hard time putting it all back together. But the one thing I remembered from the manual was that the bolt had to be dropped beforehand to make sure the springs weren't under tension. While I watched him take his gun apart, I told him to drop the bolt at least five times before he lifted the cover off. Each time I mentioned this, he cussed at me and told me he knew what he was doing(he was about 16 years old at the time).

...When the cover opened an inch, about 15 tiny springs went flying in every direction all over his extremely messy room. He paused for a second, realized what just happened and then yelled the F word at the top of his lungs.

We never did find all those springs.

win71
September 28, 2010, 10:02 PM
Don't ever, I repeat, don't ever completely tear down any Parker shotgun.

FIVETWOSEVEN
September 28, 2010, 10:16 PM
Of the stuff I own, the Mosin-Nagant has the toughest bolt take down, everything else is smooth.

I learned to Completely take apart my Mosin without any instructions including the bolt. I don't see how its hard at all.

Vyacheslav
September 28, 2010, 11:12 PM
the hard part about a mosin bolt is getting that firing pin screwed back in, just press it up against a block of wood and you should be fine

T2K
September 29, 2010, 12:26 AM
AMT (Ruger clone) 10/22 - all the little stuff going on inside the bolt and trigger group sucks.

In general, this is one of the main reasons I like to own military surplus stuff: they are designed for ease of cleaning, reassembly, etc.

Having said that, I've got a Springfield Armory 1911 and it's a Swiss clock to clean compared to, say, a Sig P226 or Walther P-38 / P-1. No gun should need an Allen wrench to take apart. All military guns should be able to be stripped with hands.

essayons21
September 29, 2010, 12:41 AM
Allen wrench for a 1911?

Replace that 2 piece guide rod with a standard recoil spring guide or even a 1 piece FLGR.

IlikeSA
September 29, 2010, 02:31 AM
My Dad had a Remington 742 Woodmaster which I broke down pretty good one time. It took 2 other people to help me get the recoil spring back into place in the fore end. That was the last time I ever cleaned that rifle that well.

heron
September 29, 2010, 09:52 AM
My Hi-Point 995TS. Those things were not made to be disassembled neatly. The worst part is that, to get it completely apart, you have to remove the front sight block (the whole thing -- off the barrel) and need to re-sight the gun after stripping it.

And that's not even detail stripping it -- I won't even try that.

I'll never try detail stripping my Ruger GP100, either . . .

RimfireChris
September 29, 2010, 10:49 AM
The hardest thing I ever stripped was the first time with my Luger. That said, I've been wanting a Ruger MK II/III but have been put off by the horror stories on threads like this one.

bigfatdave
September 29, 2010, 01:42 PM
I've been wanting a Ruger MK II/III but have been put off by the horror stories on threads like this one. just get it, all the horror stories are from first-time attempts and a failure to follow Rule Zero: "Don't Panic"

Kruzr
September 29, 2010, 01:50 PM
In the years I worked at a range, the number one gun that new owners would show up with in pieces in a box were the Ruger MkII's.

Just about every time the owners did not follow the instructions in the manual. Holding the muzzle up or down or using something to push the hammer forward when closing the MSH was almost always the issue.

Shadow 7D
September 29, 2010, 06:37 PM
I mean the MK3 arn't that bad, just, you need the manual, and to follow it step by step to get it back to gather, and some stuff can come apart one way, but MUST be put back together a certain other way, and thats the kicker, if you don't have the manual in front of you.

GRIZ22
September 29, 2010, 08:09 PM
I can't get over the fascination so many people have in taking their firerams completely apart on a regular basis. If the gun is manitained properly there is no need to do this. No matter how fouled a gun has been (dropped in soupy mud, sand, etc) I have always been able to clean it without taking it apart. The only reason you need to take a gun completely apart is if its broken.

speedreed
September 29, 2010, 08:23 PM
One time I thought that I was going to go insane trying to put an M1 Carbine extractor back in the bolt.

Sport45
September 29, 2010, 09:12 PM
I can't get over the fascination so many people have in taking their firerams completely apart on a regular basis. If the gun is manitained properly there is no need to do this. No matter how fouled a gun has been (dropped in soupy mud, sand, etc) I have always been able to clean it without taking it apart. The only reason you need to take a gun completely apart is if its broken.

I agree whole-heartedly. I saw the error in my ways when I took a Ruger KP94DC slide apart. Never again.

I don't have any guns that I routinely detail strip for cleaning or anything else.

Rembrandt
September 29, 2010, 09:22 PM
I agree about the Lugers......

Maia007
September 30, 2010, 09:54 PM
The Remington 51 auto pistol is quite the challenge.

oldgold
September 30, 2010, 10:36 PM
The Remington 51 auto pistol is quite the challenge. +1

Gunshop owner/gunsmith took mine apart and couldn't get it back together. Took me about two hours to figure it out.

My worst was a '92 Winchester lever action. Had it for two days and together four times before it worked right.

Did a trigger job on an N.E.F. handi-rifle. Took all day.

Bought a Hig Standard SPort King with a broken trigger return spring. Worked on it for three month offf and on until I dreamed about how to put it in. Took five minutes.

Ain't guns fun?

FROGO207
September 30, 2010, 10:44 PM
I own an even dozen Ruger MK II's and after the first time with each one and getting the lever in the grip that holds the barrel in place to move smoothly and tilting the thing the correct way it is a breeze. On a couple of them I used a fine stone to hone the passage for that lever and that made all the difference. BTW all of them but one are SS models. I like the fact that they are not as able to rust if used outside in damp weather.

Defense Minister
September 30, 2010, 11:09 PM
Ruger MkII. Takedown is easy, reassemly is a PITA. I have to refer to the manual every time, and it still takes a couple of tries.

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