.357 lever


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lebowski
September 30, 2010, 08:30 PM
I recently purchased a S&W 686p and I wanted to get a .357 lever action to go with it. I'd like to shoot .38spl out of it too.

What does everyone recommend? Winchester '92? Marlin? Henry?

I was thinking about this Winchester 20" '92

http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/58731

Thoughts?

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W.E.G.
September 30, 2010, 08:32 PM
If iron sights are your thing, that should do quite nicely.

bikerdoc
September 30, 2010, 08:40 PM
Make mine Marlin.

easy
September 30, 2010, 08:45 PM
Marlin. Better gun.

PT1911
September 30, 2010, 08:51 PM
for a 357.... I would go 92... Lighter, shorter, and... prettier...

Marlin if you want to scope it.

Jeff H
September 30, 2010, 09:11 PM
Rossi's can be had for less than 1/2 the price of the Win.
http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/56500

These are well respected in the Cowboy action circles and mine has been perfectly reliable.

76shuvlinoff
September 30, 2010, 09:13 PM
As far as shorter, lighter and prettier goes, 1977 Marlin 1894c here and it would take some doing to talk me out of it.

CraigC
September 30, 2010, 09:15 PM
Marlin. Better gun.
Hardly! The Winchester is a "better" gun, lighter in weight, stronger and a more refined design. The Marlin is simply more affordable. The late model 1892's, as well as every other offering made by Miroku, are better-built leverguns than anything produced domestically in at least the last half century.

Kymasabe
September 30, 2010, 09:17 PM
You'd be hard pressed to find a better gun than the Marlin.
Good friend of mine has been hog hunting with his for years. Reliable and accurate.

Snakum
September 30, 2010, 09:32 PM
I called my dealer just today to price a Rossi 92 in .357 for plinking and maybe some cowboy shooting. $400 plus NC taxes ain't bad. The general consensus is that the Rossi is perfectly serviceable and reliable, and pretty accurate for what it is.

But if I had the money, I'd be getting a Marlin instead. I have looked closely at the Marlins and the Winchesters and read everything I could find on them. And the general consensus is that the Marlin is beefier and more robust.

lebowski
September 30, 2010, 10:04 PM
This gun will be iron sights only.

Pretty and good fit and finish is just as if not more important as shootability, for this purchase (in most cases my priorities are the other way around)

Do the '92 and the Marlin both shoot .38 special?

Jeff H
September 30, 2010, 10:13 PM
Do the '92 and the Marlin both shoot .38 special?

The 1892's do and do it well. Its like shooting a 22 when you use 38 spec. 357 step it up a couple of notches

c919
September 30, 2010, 10:58 PM
I'd go with a Win. 94 Trapper personally. If not that, it'd be a Marlin.

Those would be my top choices, but Henry and Rossi both make great one's as well.

zxcvbob
September 30, 2010, 11:12 PM
Do the '92 and the Marlin both shoot .38 special? My Marlin 1894C handles .38 Specials and even .357 Magnum wadcutters (they are shorter than typical .38 Specials) just fine. It will not feed .38 Special wadcutters.

You'll need to pick one load and adjust your sights though; going back and forth between .38's and .357's changes the POI quite a bit.

CraigC
September 30, 2010, 11:20 PM
And the general consensus is that the Marlin is beefier and more robust.
The Marlin may be beefier, because it is slightly larger and heavier, but the 1892 is simply a stronger design due to its large vertical locking lugs. This is well-proven and well-known. In the bigger chamberings, the Marlin is safe only to about 40,000psi, while the 1892 is the only action smaller than the 1886 that is strong enough for the .454Casull cartridge.

1858
October 1, 2010, 02:07 AM
The Marlin may be beefier, because it is slightly larger and heavier, but the 1892 is simply a stronger design due to its large vertical locking lugs. This is well-proven and well-known.

If the Marlin is strong enough, which it is, how is this even relevant?! The 1894 comes in .45 Colt and .44 Magnum chamberings as well, so the action strength isn't an issue at all.

lebowski, check out the 1894CSS. It's the stainless version and it's a great rifle. I bought one earlier this year. Add a Wild West trigger and some decent sights such as those offered by Skinner and you'll be one happy camper.

:)

CraigC
October 1, 2010, 03:16 AM
...how is this even relevant?
It may or may not be relevant. I simply supply the facts and the OP can make his decision based on them.

In this particular chambering, it is not really an issue. Maybe you should actually read what I responded to. Snakum posted, "...the general consensus is that the Marlin is beefier and more robust", which implies that the Marlin is the stronger of the two. Which is completely untrue. This is not a difference of opinion, we cannot agree to disagree, it is undeniable fact. I really could care less which is chosen because both are wonderful rifles. I own multiple examples of each. But if a feller is gonna make a decision based in part on what's posted here, the information should at least be correct. Particularly since in the future folks will be searching and find this thread, possibly thinking of another chambering in which the strength would an issue and be completely misled by what was posted. Because the 1892 is 50% stronger than the Marlin and THAT matters if you're hotrodding a .45Colt.

PAPACHUCK
October 1, 2010, 06:17 AM
When I was looking for a 357 lever gun, I looked hard at the Marlin. It would be my first choice, if it were available in a 16" barrel, and was a couple hundred $ less.

So I picked this one, and it's a winner. Light, handy, affordable, reliable, and just plain fun. My 9yr old granddaughter loves shooting it with .38's, it is just like shooting a .22 rifle. With full power .357's, it's still not bad.

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h11/PAPACHUCK/IMG_1419-1.jpg

GIT-U-1 !

Abel
October 1, 2010, 07:32 AM
Hardly! The Winchester is a "better" gun, lighter in weight, stronger and a more refined design.

Its not better, its just a little different. You try taking a winny apart in the field and then tell me with a straight face that its better.

RevDerb
October 1, 2010, 07:46 AM
I have a Marlin 1894 chambered in .357 and it is the most accurate of my lever guns. Or at least I shoot it most accurately of the three. Owned a Winchester 94 in .30-30 once and there was no problem with it either.

sansone
October 1, 2010, 09:31 AM
marlin 1894c was one of the best rifles on my list of guns I should have kept :D .. really shined when I reloaded some slower burning rifle powder for it. somebody gave me a dumptruck full of money for it.. mistake selling it :scrutiny:

CraigC
October 1, 2010, 11:58 AM
Its not better, its just a little different. You try taking a winny apart in the field and then tell me with a straight face that its better.
It is better. It's better in every way. Fit and finish are FAR superior to any Marlin of recent production. Which tend to be a little rough. It's a more compact and refined design. It's lighter and more comfortable to carry. The Miroku guns are simply higher in qualty, which is good because they cost quite a bit more.

Again, there is no reason to get defensive. I'm not crapping on Marlin. I own several and they are wonderful. My 1894S is one of the most accurate rifles I own and great hog medicine. They're a great value but just not up to the quality standards of the Miroku guns, period. They are beautifully made rifles.

Oh and let me count the number of times I've needed to disassemble ANY rifle in the field.......zero.

Let me also count the number of times I needed to disassemble a Winchester and had any difficulty whatsoever.........zero.

LeverGunJunkie
October 1, 2010, 12:48 PM
I've been a Winny guy since I could hold a gun, but the Marlin is the best overall value in this case. I love mine with XS sights. It has become my go to levergun for any woods walking I do. There is absolutely no reason to pay a grand for a 357MAG lever gun, as long as the Marlin 1894C is around.

CraigC
October 1, 2010, 12:56 PM
There is absolutely no reason to pay a grand for a 357MAG lever gun...
That's a matter of preference and depends entirely on what appeals to you and what's important to you. Marlins are great rifles and a good value but there are those of us who like to enjoy the finer things in life and are willing to pay for it. The $900 you'd spend on that Winchester does get you more. Whether or not you appreciate what it has to offer or are willing to pay for it is another matter entirely and strictly personal.

LubeckTech
October 1, 2010, 01:15 PM
I have a Rossi in .44mag which is a good gun but has a "gritty" feeling action. If I had it to do over I would go with a marlin as the ones I have shot have been smoother and Marlins are drilled and tapped for a scope. From my experience the Marlins have a better fit and finish BUT a stainless Rossi can be had for around $450 and with a little work can be made into an outstanding gun. If you are mechanically inclined (or have a friend who is)you can slick up a Rossi pretty without much trouble. There are several good resources on how to do this on the net as the Rossis are pretty common in the cowboy action world. Before I would pay $900 for a Winchester I would buy a Rossi and have it slicked up, trigger job and a short action kit installed - you should be able to have all of that done by a good gunsmith for less than a Winchester and probably have a better gun.

merlinfire
October 1, 2010, 01:16 PM
Craig, you don't work for Winchester do you?

In all seriousness, I always hear good things about both guns. One, however, is more affordable.

LeverGunJunkie
October 1, 2010, 01:20 PM
That's a matter of preference and depends entirely on what appeals to you and what's important to you. Marlins are great rifles and a good value but there are those of us who like to enjoy the finer things in life and are willing to pay for it. The $900 you'd spend on that Winchester does get you more. Whether or not you appreciate what it has to offer or are willing to pay for it is another matter entirely and strictly personal.

Yeah. Sure man. Try the decaf tomorrow. I guess I just don't have an appreciation for the finer things. :confused:

zxcvbob
October 1, 2010, 01:25 PM
I was actually looking for a Winchester when I bought my Marlin a few years ago. I was just a couple of months too late before I started looking; that was right about the time Winchester shut down and there were none in the distribution lines already -- if there were, at the time I could have bought a Winchester for the same price as the Marlin.

Another one that really caught my eye was the Puma '92 chambered in .454 Casull. Don't know if they still make that one.

ChristopherG
October 1, 2010, 01:51 PM
My Marlin 1894c has thousands and thousands of rounds of .38 and .357 down the pipe. It gained a couple hundred more yesterday and I had a great time doing it. It is still accurate, beautiful and incomparably handy.

If I fell on hard times it is the last long gun I would ever let go. I don't have experience with the other models discussed except handling them in gunshops--but I know the owners of Marlin .357 carbines tend to feel about them the way I do.

CraigC
October 1, 2010, 01:54 PM
Craig, you don't work for Winchester do you?
No, I just look at this stuff objectively because I own several examples of each. I appreciate them for what they are and see the value in both. Yes, the Winchesters cost more but you also get more. Is it the best choice for YOU? That's something you have to decide for yourself.


...that was right about the time Winchester shut down and there were none in the distribution lines already...
The Winchester in question is current production and unrelated to the shutdown of the domestic plants producing model 94's. Production of USRAC special runs by Miroku of Japan never skipped a beat.


Yeah. Sure man. Try the decaf tomorrow.
Did you not imply that the Winchester is just a bloated price for a famous name??? You said there was no reason to pay $900 for a Winchester when Marlins are available for less. I was simply pointing out WHY someone would pay $900 for the Winchester.


Why do people have an undying need to believe that their choice is "better" (in terms of quality) than all the rest??? Apparently some folks have issues accepting the fact that the existence of something of higher quality does not make their choice junk. Quite the contrary. I own replica sixguns of Uberti and USFA manufacture. The simple fact that USFA's are of higher quality and exhibit better fit and finish does not make my Uberti's junk. Nor does it diminish my opinion of them in any way.

1858
October 1, 2010, 04:41 PM
In this particular chambering, it is not really an issue.

It's not an issue in ANY chambering!! The Marlin and Winchester both have strong enough actions and it wouldn't be hard to verify which is the stronger of the two ... but who cares ... it simply isn't important!! So to the OP, make your choice based on what IS important such as cost, fit, finish, function, factory support, accessories, etc.

:)

Abel
October 1, 2010, 05:49 PM
It is better. It's better in every way. Fit and finish are FAR superior to any Marlin of recent production.

I understand that FN now makes some nice leverguns with the Winchester name on them, but they aren't "FAR superior" to a Marlin made in Connecticut.

Maybe the last run of Connecticut Marlins and the newest run in the new facility in New York aren't the best thing Marlin has ever produced. But don't judge an entire model by two or three runs. The Japan-made Winnies are a notch above anything made since 1963. All those runs between then and now were hit or miss and you & me both know it.

:)

quietman
October 1, 2010, 07:23 PM
My opinion, Marlin. But it's a personal preference, just like everyone elses answer.

as an 1894C owner, I can say anyone that's ever shot it has enjoyed the heck out of it. The only jam it's had came from an individual not cycling the lever fully. Pointed that out and of he went having more fun.

Why? Accurate, durable, fun, easier to take down than a Winny or Rossi. (One screw and out comes the lever and the bolt). Typically easier for most people to work on than a Winny.

Despite what CraigC says, Winnys and Marlins are on a par when it comes to durability.

As far as a "more refined" design. . . it all depends. If you consider simplicity more refined, it would be the Marlin. If you consider slimmer lines more refined, it would be the Winny and it's knock offs.

Winny is NOT lighter than a Marlin.
These numbers come from specifications listed for each rifle at Bud's gun shop.
Winchester 92 is listed at 6.5 lbs
Marlin 1894 Cowboy with a 20" barrel is 6.5 lbs (this is the Marlin comparable to the Win 92 the OP listed)
Rossi with a 20" barrel is 6.1 lbs
Marlin 1894C with 18" barrel is 6.0 lbs
Henry checks in at a whopping 8.7 lbs

But then, ligher may or may not be a benefit. The bigger /stronger you are the easier it is to stabilize a heavier gun. There is a crossover point where a heavier gun is better for an individual or a lighter gun is better. That is determined by you. Balance also can change how guns handle relative to each other. You won't notice an extra half pound if the heavier gun is better balanced than the lighter one.

As for Marlin's and what they feed. Keep cartridge length within the range listed and they typically feed 38's and 357's equally well. Which is why they won't feed 38 special wadcutters, too short.

Also, do you want a top eject or side eject?
Top: Winny, Rossi, Uberti
Side: Marlin, Henry
CraigC
Why do people have an undying need to believe that their choice is "better" (in terms of quality) than all the rest??? I don't know, tell my why you do the same thing you are chastising other people for, and maybe that will answer your own question.:rolleyes:

Final answer to the OP is:
They are all fun to shoot. Go to a gun store and see how they feel for you. Then get the one you'll enjoy the most. Try them with different barrel lengths if you can. In fact, see if you can take a look at a Henry too. Then make your decision.

Other info
http://www.chuckhawks.com/compared_big-boy_1894C_1873.htm

Red Cent
October 1, 2010, 10:03 PM
http://www.taylorsfirearms.com/products/cf1873Winchester.tpl

Badlander
October 1, 2010, 10:20 PM
Might want to check out this thread before buying A Winchester.
http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=546824

CraigC
October 2, 2010, 01:09 AM
It's not an issue in ANY chambering!!
Ugh!!! There is a strength difference between the Colt SAA and the large frame Ruger Blackhawk. In .45Colt this difference is quite meaningful to some folks. For the Colt is only safe to around 21,000psi but the Ruger is safe to 32,000psi. Following me so far? Likewise, there is a strength difference between the Marlin 1894 and the Winchester 1892. In .45Colt this difference is quite meaningful to some folks because the Marlin is only safe to around 40,000psi but the 1892 is strong enough to endure 50,000psi loads, which are in the custom five-shot Ruger class. Morever, several years ago every manufacturer was trying to adapt their levergun to the .454Casull cartridge. I know this because it was reported on the old Sixgunner.com site by Bob Baker. Every available action was tried, the Marlin 1894 and 336 (1895), the Winchester 94 (standard and Big Bore) as well as the 1886 and 1892. The 1892 proved to be the only action smaller than the 1886 with any promise. The Marlins and Winchester 94's all shook themselves loose in short order. The 1886 is plenty of meat but obviously way too large for the cartridge. So the result is that the only commercial rifle available in .454Casull is the 1892. While no proprietary information has been released, experts on the matter have found no significant design changes. So, after all that, what the hell is the problem with making the simple statement of fact that the Winchester 1892 is stronger than the Marlin 1894???

Does this matter in .357? Not really. However, my statement of irrefutable FACT is that the 1892 is indeed stronger than the Marlin and that that fact MAY be important to some folks. I also made the statement to refute what another poster said about the Marlin being "beefier and more robust", which is incorrect. I give you the facts, you make your decision.


I understand that FN now makes some nice leverguns with the Winchester name on them, but they aren't "FAR superior" to a Marlin made in Connecticut.
FN is not producing levers with the Winchester name. Every single cotton-picking 1892 that has been produced under the Winchester banner since domestic production was halted years ago has been manufactured by Miroku. Myself and anybody who is anybody who has any experience with these guns understands that Miroku builds a better quality levergun than Winchester or Marlin have produced domestically in the last century.


I don't know, tell my why you do the same thing you are chastising other people for, and maybe that will answer your own question.
I own an example of every rifle I've mentioned in this thread. How exactly am I doing what I "chastise" others for??? For the record, I'm not chastising anybody. I'm simply trying to make some general statements about the guns in question from personal experience. Objectively speaking, the late model 1892 is simply a better made gun than a Marlin. Period. Like I also said before, I'm not crapping on Marlin, even though you guys act as if I did. Like I also said before they're fine rifles and I OWN THREE OF THEM!!!!!!! They're good guns and a good value. My Browning 53 and Winchester 1892 are just better. Which is godo because they cost more. Just like a Cadillac costs more than a Chevy. Repeat, Marlin is not junk, Japchesters are just better. Stop trying so hard to be offended.


Despite what CraigC says, Winnys and Marlins are on a par when it comes to durability.
You're right, those engineers that tested these guns to their limits just imagined the results. :banghead:

CraigC
October 2, 2010, 01:11 AM
Might want to check out this thread before buying A Winchester.
How is a thread about the 1894 relevant to a discussion on the 1892?

1858
October 2, 2010, 01:25 AM
Ugh!!! There is a strength difference between the Colt SAA and the large frame Ruger Blackhawk. In .45Colt this difference is quite meaningful to some folks. For the Colt is only safe to around 21,000psi but the Ruger is safe to 32,000psi. Following me so far? Likewise, there is a strength difference between the Marlin 1894 and the Winchester 1892. In .45Colt this difference is quite meaningful to some folks because the Marlin is only safe to around 40,000psi but the 1892 is strong enough to endure 50,000psi loads, which are in the custom five-shot Ruger class.

I have two USFA Rodeos, two Ruger Blackhawks, a Ruger Redhawk, a Ruger Super Redhawk and a Marlin '94 all chambered for the .45 Colt and I can tell you for a fact that there isn't a .45 Colt load out there that the Blackhawk/Redhawk/Super Redhawk can handle but the Marlin can't ... following me so far?!

:)

CraigC
October 2, 2010, 01:47 AM
I can tell you for a fact that there isn't a .45 Colt load out there that the Blackhawk/Redhawk/Super Redhawk can handle but the Marlin can't ... following me so far?!
Your Rodeo is safe to 21,000psi, the Marlin is safe for those.

Your Blackhawk is safe to 32,000psi, the Marlin is safe for those.

Your Redhawk is safe to 50,000psi, your Marlin is NOT safe for those. The 1892 is.

Unless it's a custom job, your Super Redhawk is a .454 and safe to 55,000psi (in .45Colt brass) and your Marlin is certainly NOT safe for those.

1858
October 2, 2010, 01:52 AM
CraigC, give me a real-world example of a .45 Colt load that would generate 50ksi or 55ksi. I'm talking bullet, powder, primer, case.

:)

zxcvbob
October 2, 2010, 02:08 AM
give me a real-world example of a .45 Colt load that would generate 50ksi or 55ksi. I'm talking bullet, powder, primer, case.PM sent.

KodeFore
October 2, 2010, 08:22 AM
Any major brand gun will proably work OK, your best bet is to go handle anything you are interested in & then buy the the one that feels the best to you. My gp100 was gettting lonely so i picked up a marlin 1894 in 357 from a big 5 sale and really like it. Eventually I picked up a marlin 39 mounty from a local gun show (1964 vintage in minty shape) and alongside the 1894 it looks like they are a matched set. Thats what I like. If the winchester appeals to you by all means go for it it!

CraigC
October 2, 2010, 10:48 AM
CraigC, give me a real-world example of a .45 Colt load that would generate 50ksi or 55ksi. I'm talking bullet, powder, primer, case.
All custom five-shot load data is 50-55,000psi. John Taffin and Brian Pearce have published load data in the 45-50,000psi range for the Redhawk.

http://singleactions.com/files/FiveShot45Colts.pdf

quietman
October 2, 2010, 11:22 AM
Maybe if you actually knew what durability meant, you'd understand my comment
so here you go:

du·ra·ble (dhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/oobreve.gifrhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/prime.gifhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/schwa.gif-bhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/schwa.gifl, dyhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/oobreve.gifrhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/prime.gif-)adj.
1. Capable of withstanding wear and tear or decay over time.
2. Able to perform or compete over a long period

So the point is shooting STANDARD loads in either rifle both will will last for a long time.

The engineers didn't test durability, they tested max strength, A durability test would be placing the rifles in a mechanism that would continuously load, cycle and fire the guns to point of failure using regular commercial 357 loads.

However, you seem to be enamored with the design limits for some reason and assume that automatically makes you right (what you accuse everyone else of doing). Sorry, but there's more to a rifle than pressure limits

Let's get down to it. In 357 who gives a rats arse about what the pressure limits of the action are when the max SAMI specs are 35,000 and the action is rated over that- whether it's a Marlin or Winchester? In 357 it doesn't matter. And dragging in the 454 casual doesn't change the fact that for a 357 you aren't going to be trying to push those limits. Neither is dragging the 45LC into the mix going to change the fact that the OP is asking about a 357. So who cares if a 45 load hits 50,000?

So as far as the original posters question about a 357 levergun, your arguments about a stronger action are basically meaningless. What matters is what I put in my previous post. Balance, maintenance, and long term durability. Balance is very subjective and can only be answered by each individual. Maintenance is a matter of complexity of the mechanism, and durability is looking at how many are still working after thousands of rounds through them.

So you can continue harping about chamber pressure and action strength all you want. But for a rifle in 357 it isn't going to make any difference because you aren't going to approach that limit in the first place.

Fremmer
October 2, 2010, 11:30 AM
I think if I were buying a .357 rifle, I'd look at both the Marlin and Winchester. If the Marlin is significantly less money, I'd probably go with it. Marlin has been making rifles for a long time, they shoot well, and it'll be plenty tough enough for a .357 mag. But buy whichever one trips your trigger (and that you can afford). For real-world (non-internet) shootin', the Marlin will shoot just fine.

lebowski
October 2, 2010, 11:31 AM
That's a matter of preference and depends entirely on what appeals to you and what's important to you. Marlins are great rifles and a good value but there are those of us who like to enjoy the finer things in life and are willing to pay for it. The $900 you'd spend on that Winchester does get you more. Whether or not you appreciate what it has to offer or are willing to pay for it is another matter entirely and strictly personal.
What exactly is the "more" that the Win offers for the price?

CraigC
October 2, 2010, 11:40 AM
quietman,
If one rifle can withstand more pressure without undue wear than another, then it is more durable. Period. Thanks for the English class.

I'm not harping about chamber pressures!!! I tried to make the simple statement that the 92 is a stronger design and everything that has followed has been in defense of that simple (and true!) statement. Because you Marlin owners, for some reason, get awfully defensive when folks imply that there 'may' be something "better" on the market. I have stated multiple times that in .357 IT DOES NOT MATTER. I really don't give a rat's ass which one the OP chooses but he should make his choice with facts in hand, not personal opinion conveyed as fact. The two statements which I take issue with is that the Marlin is "better" (which is a subjective term I take to relate to quality) and that it is also stronger. Neither of which is true. Both of which probably made by people with zero experience with the Winchester in question. Or anything like it.

Do you understand that all this nonsense has been because you guys have basically called me a liar???


What exactly is the "more" that the Win offers for the price?
The fit and finish on the Winchester will be much, much better than on any late model Marlin. Marlin's are great rifles but the exterior, and this is something you can ascertain in any gunshop, is usually a little rough. You'll see machine marks and much of the exterior surface will be bead blasted. The Winchester will have a fine polish on every surface, like the olde days. Much more attention is paid to these guns and the prices reflect that. Wood to metal fit is always better as well. The checkering is typically better and the actions are smoother. Again, and I can't stress this enough, it's not that the Marlins are bad, the Winchesters are just better. The other thing I'd like to reiterate for the frothy among us, is that this does not extend to any domestically produced Winchester since 1963 (except the 94/22). But it does extend to every other Winchester and Browning produced by Miroku.

zxcvbob
October 2, 2010, 11:45 AM
So which is better, a Ruger or a S&W?

Snakum
October 2, 2010, 11:47 AM
While the Marlin and Winchester people insult each other to death I ordered a stainless 20" round Rossi 92 in .357 mag this morning. :D

Now I just need a Norinco pump gun and a Ruger Vaquero and I can stink up the local cow poke matches.

CraigC
October 2, 2010, 11:53 AM
While the Marlin and Winchester people insult each other to death...
This is the crux of the issue. While I have made every attempt to be perfectly clear that I AM NOT dumping on Marlin, you guys read it that way anyway. Like I've said a hundred times, I OWN AND ENJOY BOTH!!!! They each have a lot going for them. They each have their strong points. I have a Marlin at the front door and a Winchester at the back door. With half a dozen in between.

REPEAT::: I am NOT RECOMMENDING ONE OVER THE OTHER!!!!!!

For you Marlin guys, I did not spit on your dog. You've gone out of your way to get offended and I've gone out of my way to avoid it. So if you've taken anything I've said about Marlins as a personal insult, it's your own fault. Only a fool takes offense where none was intended.


So which is better, a Ruger or a S&W?
More like Uberti or USFA.

Janos Dracwlya
October 2, 2010, 12:41 PM
I have a stainless Rossi Model 92 that I bought in 1998 or 1999 for Cowboy Action Shooting. It was very lightly used when I bought it, and the action was still a bit gritty. It was not a problem, however. I started CAS in 2000, and, about a year after that, I was at a match where I ended up sharing with another shooter whose Winchester 92 had broken it's carrier. After shooting it for a couple of stages, he asked me who had slicked the action for me; I had to tell him that no one had - it was just from using it in target practice and matches (and not that many of those - I only shot about half a dozen a year).

Now, to the gun's one problem. It doesn't like wadcutters, nor does it like most semi-wadcutters, except for Zero brand (smaller shoulder on them), though if you work the lever very forcefully, SWC's will work. Everything else, though, it shoots just fine, .38 or .357 magnum. For a long time it was my go-to rifle for home defense.

If I ever sell my CAS guns - since I'm no longer active in the sport - the Rossi will be the one I keep.

david58
October 2, 2010, 12:47 PM
Maybe its not that Win and Marlin rally want to insult each other to death, but maybe the simple desire to be right?

Seems that any of the rifles mentioned will do the job adequately, with minor differences in appearance or maybe some difference in range performance. All that would be up to the shopper (OP) to decide whilst he has his hands on the guns.

Admittedly an Marlin guy, I'll also admit it's because I grew up from a wee little one shooting Marlin 39's, and might have shot 10 rounds from a Winchester, ever. Simply personal preference, and shy of very high pressure rounds, I think that's where it comes down for the most part on this thread, too.

oldfool
October 2, 2010, 12:58 PM
well, I own both the LSI/Rossi Puma 92 and the Marlin 1894C and love 'em both
ain't nothing wrong with Henry either, all good
OP needs to pick 'em up, throw to shoulder, and work the actions for himself, because they all feel a bit different, and that's the only real tie breaker that matters

obliged to say though that Craig C is on target
amongst the really really serious hard core lever gun afficionados, the Browning/Miroku '92 in 357 is, no kidding, legendary
(color me envious, legendary = not cheap)

PS
and Browning/Miroku really did make a late run of the "Winchester" labeled 9422M Legacy in 22WMR ;)
my son-in-law has one, only because he got to it before I did
likewise 'to die for' as you might well expect

oldfool
October 2, 2010, 01:14 PM
just curious.. the Winchester name showing some signs of life again
who makes their current lever actions - FN/Browning/Miroku, or somebody just licensed to use the name ?

prices look like FN/Browning/Miroku
Morgan Utah sound like Browning

DirtyHarry31
October 2, 2010, 03:00 PM
I wanted a rifle to go with my my all around guns to keep for my truck, hiking or camping. My combo for all these is a Rossi Stainless 357 with a 20" barrel, my S&W 686 4" barrel, and my backup a S&W 360 M&P in 357 mag. 357 mag is the way to go. Ammo is cheap (38 specials), easy to handle, get to shoot alot more to be ready if SHTF. Your wife or kids could shoot without the recoil. Rossi are inexpensive but is very reliable. There is a guy named Steve who can provide all you need for your Rossi on the internet under Steve's Gunz. Bottom line is pick what you like but you do not need to spend the money on an expensive level action to get great results. Lots of people love the Rossi/Puma '92. As for the "357" for hunting, here's a link to some stats:
http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=47&t=298138
The reason you have the gun is to shoot it, why spend all that money on an expensive one when you could have one for 1/2 - 2/3 the cost. Get the all stainless one, it's well worth it and real easy to take care of. Just my .02 .

Maverick223
October 2, 2010, 05:03 PM
For a pistol caliber lever gun I like the Marlin better, though the IMI Timberwolf deserves a look if you are willing to consider pumps.

:)

1858
October 2, 2010, 10:01 PM
Your Redhawk is safe to 50,000psi, your Marlin is NOT safe for those. The 1892 is.

You make a good point. My Super Redhawk is chambered for the .45 Colt and .454 Casull so it stands to reason that it's good to the SAAMI .454 Casull spec of 50,000 CUP which clearly my '94 isn't.

:)

lebowski
October 3, 2010, 09:03 PM
I'm pretty sure none of my local gun stores have the '92 in stock, so looking at them both in person likely isn't an option.

Is the general consensus that the '92 has a better fit & finish?

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