Do you have a friend that you will never take to a gun range?


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TexasGunbie
October 1, 2010, 01:10 PM
I took a friend to the gun range maybe a year ago and he was a horrible shot. He's a very good friend and shown interest in guns, and he's been thinking about getting one.

Anyways, he came over yesterday and I show him a few guns. I knew I was going to show him my guns so I had emptied them few hours prior to his arrival. Well he opened the case, picked up the gun, and pointed it straight at me as he was looking down the sight. So I told him not to ever point a gun at anyone, and he said well it's empty anyways... I ask him how he would know, and so he went on to check the gun... while still pointing the gun at me the whole time.

Now we are in our mid 20s, but clearly I don't think my buddy shows the maturity to handle a firearm. And now I am probably not going to take him to the gun range anymore.

Now I am quite inexperience myself, and was not taught proper gun handling. I taught myself how to safely handle a gun by reading online materials. What can I do to educate my friend on gun safety?

As the topic goes... are there friends you will never take to the gun range because of something that happened while handling a gun????

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Dnaltrop
October 1, 2010, 01:15 PM
2, and they both did the same thing.

"here , let me show you this gun!"

Pulls slide, shows empty chamber.... drops slide... Removes magazine, Then meets the cry of "watch out, you just chambered it" with " No I didn't!", and pulls the trigger with the gun pointed near my gut to prove me wrong. (Boom!)

I'm still here, Unperforated, and it's taken me years to get comfortable enough to shoot around anyone. I just this year joined a private range because the 100+ mile drive to go shooting was annoying the wife.

Unistat
October 1, 2010, 01:17 PM
Well how was he supposed to know the 4 rules if no one ever told him? Do your part and educate him. If he won't listen, then you have something to complain about.

I know it is awkward, but hey, I had to teach the 4 rules to my dad who is an Army vet. It had been years since he really handled a gun and he wanted to get his carry permit. I took him to the range, but I made sure we both had the same understanding of gun handling.

It's not a disrespect thing, but a "I want to make sure we are all on the same page thing."

dovedescending
October 1, 2010, 01:20 PM
Hmm... off the top of my head, no. The people I hang with and count as friends are either not interested in guns, or the ones who got ME into shooting in the first place :)

I can think of a few folks who might THINK they are my friends, though...

41magsnub
October 1, 2010, 01:22 PM
A buddy of mine I took hunting once and only once. He dropped his rifle while walking behind me, as it fell a stick entered the trigger guard and when it hit the ground it fired. The bullet hit about 4" in front of my foot. He had a round chambered and the safety off. I've never done anything involving firearms with him since.

buck460XVR
October 1, 2010, 01:26 PM
Now I am quite inexperience myself, and was not taught proper gun handling. I taught myself how to safely handle a gun by reading online materials. What can I do to educate my friend on gun safety?




IMHO, you and your friend both need to take a class in hunter and/or firearm safety. Most local DNR, NWTF, and other sportsmen/shooting clubs offer free or inexpensive safety classes. There are also private and commercial type safety/training classes. I applaud you for learning what you can from the internet, but there is nothing like hands on training from a qualified teacher. I help with a local hunter safety program. It amazes me the amount of adults that bring their kids in for hunter safety that know less than their kids about firearms and firearm safety. Assuming a gun is unloaded is the #1 mistake I see being made.

Ragnar Danneskjold
October 1, 2010, 01:27 PM
2, and they both did the same thing.

"here , let me show you this gun!"

Pulls slide, shows empty chamber.... drops slide... Removes magazine, Then meets the cry of "watch out, you just chambered it" with " No I didn't!", and pulls the trigger with the gun pointed near my gut to prove me wrong. (Boom!)

I'm still here, Unperforated, and it's taken me years to get comfortable enough to shoot around anyone. I just this year joined a private range because the 100+ mile drive to go shooting was annoying the wife.

I would never talk to those two people again for the rest of my life.

TexasGunbie
October 1, 2010, 01:29 PM
Well how was he supposed to know the 4 rules if no one ever told him? Do your part and educate him. If he won't listen, then you have something to complain about.


You're right, and that's why I am reconsidering the whole thing. But I really thought people have the sense to not point a gun at someone without checking to see if it's loaded. I know all over the news we hear about ex military accidentally shot family member because they were joking with the firearm, but I didn't think... well I just don't... I... I just thought it was common sense to not point a firearm at someone.

Hatterasguy
October 1, 2010, 01:32 PM
Yeah one guy because all he wants to do is shoot my stuff and ammo. Bullets and guns are not free, and its not my job to supply him with thousands of dollars worth of guns and ammo for his entertainment, although he seems to think otherwise.

Sam1911
October 1, 2010, 01:33 PM
Fortunately, none that I won't take because of a gun mistake.

I know plenty of folks I have no desire ever to share a gun range with.

Those friends with whom I do shoot 99% of the time are some of the most safety conscious and professional shooters I've ever met.

Now, some of the newer folks to my shooting circle have made a few mistakes (we all have once or twice) but in the way we run our practices, range sessions, and competitons we strive to create layers of safety precautions and protocols to attempt to limit just how bad an safety infraction could realistically be. The competition-oriented framework we normally use helps with that a lot.

I don't often interact with guns and other gun folks outside of those sorts of venues. The few friends with whom I do occasionally handle firearms in an informal setting are the absolute cream of my otherwise quite responsible group.

When I do handle firearms with/around others, I consider myself responsible for my safety, my associates' safety, and our level of responsibility -- regardless of who's hands are physically on a gun at any moment. Years of safety officer practice makes me very watchful, and as ready as I can be to head off trouble before it starts. I watch where I stand in relation to the muzzle of any gun being handled, and usually have my hands in a position to block "sweeps."

I guess I should probably get out more, but I've yet to run into anyone who'd actually try that "it isn't loaded" baloney with me. Hope it stays that way.

CoRoMo
October 1, 2010, 01:35 PM
...I don't think my buddy shows the maturity to handle a firearm.
You are absolutely correct.
...are there friends you will never take to the gun range...
Friend(s)? Hmmm.

Well, I can say this: I have family members that I don't care to shoot or hunt with. I will avoid it when possible, and I will shudder with anxiety when not.
...as ready as I can be to head off trouble before it starts. I watch where I stand in relation to the muzzle of any gun being handled, and usually have my hands in a position to block "sweeps."
This is some good info. Everyone should agree that, if you are 'showing' a gun to someone and they sweep you with that gun, you bear a bit of the blame too. Be prepared for a mistake.

longhair75
October 1, 2010, 01:48 PM
I don't have many friends that shoot. I have friends and family members that, while they are not really anti-gun, they are really not interested. There are a few family members that are anti, but they leave me pretty much alone.

MrOldLude
October 1, 2010, 02:03 PM
Bad stories and incidents are opportunities. I've shot with a few people who didn't have proper respect for a firearm. I took the opportunity to show and explain proper technique to them.

Writing off people because they're stupid does nothing but pass the buck onto to someone else. It's just poor logic, and you're contributing to the problem.

Sam1911
October 1, 2010, 02:16 PM
The kinds of awareness, preparation, and "setting" I was describing should work to help you minimize how bad these "bad incidents" really are. There's "muzzle" calls and the occasional physicial reminder to keep a gun pointed downrange. Those ceratinly are teachable moments from near-violations.

If it gets to the point of you staring down the barrel of a (possibly) loaded gun, you've let things get WAY too far out of hand.

Writing off people because they're stupid does nothing but pass the buck onto to someone else.To a point. Someone who cannot or will not learn how to act with a gun -- right QUICK -- is not going to remain my problem for long. I'm a patient and gentle teacher. But I won't allow myself to be endangered.

Life's too short to let someone else's continued failures of responsibility or comprehension risk making it even shorter.

Russ Jackson
October 1, 2010, 02:17 PM
Quote: I knew I was going to show him my guns so I had emptied them few hours prior to his arrival.

Why did you have to empty the guns prior to hia arrival? Do you make a habit of leaving guns loaded? .

Plus someone would never handle a gun around me without telling them the rules. Impossible for someone to remove a gun from my case without me clearing it and handing it to them. If I went to a gun store and the cleark handed me an unchecked gun I would tell his boss. This is basic guns 101. You should have checked it prior to him touching it. I think you are to blame also. Sounds like Amature Hour...Russ

yeti
October 1, 2010, 02:25 PM
Do you make a habit of leaving guns loaded?

I can't speak for the OP, but I know I sure do keep them loaded. Why do you ask?

TexasGunbie
October 1, 2010, 02:26 PM
Writing off people because they're stupid does nothing but pass the buck onto to someone else. It's just poor logic, and you're contributing to the problem.

You're right.

In the end it comes down to my personality, I am outspoken on the internet but in real life quite the gentle giant. I hate to tell my friend that he is endangering people's live and if he wants to be a gun owner he should learn that it's no joking matter to handle one. So I did try to make him aware by pointing out to him that he shouldn't point the gun at me, but he replied that it's empty, though never checked in the first place. Subsequently I tried to lead him to a solution by asking "how you know it's empty?"... and I really thought that by asking a rhetoric question he would know the flaw in his handling. Still he keeps the gun at me.

Up to this point, I don't know how to educate him anymore. I do however realize that some people need more direct education than others.

I have shot in IDPA and go to gun range pretty regularly, but I always humbly admit that I sometimes accidentally break the rules. There are times when I lock the slide back and clear the gun, but when I lay it down on the table, I had it pointed to the guy next to me. I guess gun safety is an active learning and active practicing trait valuable in all situations.

TexasGunbie
October 1, 2010, 02:28 PM
Life's too short to let someone else's continued failures of responsibility or comprehension risk making it even shorter.

Sam... this is going into my box of good quotes.

Why did you have to empty the guns prior to hia arrival? Do you make a habit of leaving guns loaded? .

I keep only 1 gun loaded for home defense. But if I know I will show a friend a gun because he's interested in guns, I will always make sure to check and empty my guns prior.

Russ Jackson: This is basic guns 101. You should have checked it prior to him touching it. I think you are to blame also. Sounds like Amature Hour...Russ

Please go back and read original post before you write something that can be offensive...

MrOldLude
October 1, 2010, 02:30 PM
To a point. Someone who cannot or will not learn how to act with a gun -- right QUICK -- is not going to remain my problem for long. I'm a patient and gentle teacher. But I won't allow myself to be endangered.

Life's too short to let someone else's continued failures of responsibility or comprehension risk making it even shorter.
Again my point. Much of what I'm seeing here is people too willing to walk away.

Also, people incapable of learning are mentally handicapped. So they're probably more of a danger to themselves in general. Not just a gun-range.

"someone else's continued failures of responsibility or comprehension risk making it even shorter."

Passing the buck, shying away from responsibility. If this hypothetical person is as much of a danger as you seem to believe, then hopefully the person they eventually injure or kill isn't your friend or family. My life us one of opportunities. If I go through it statically, then I've failed.

Strahley
October 1, 2010, 02:33 PM
Nope, lucky for me I don't have idiots as friends, and they all know how to handle a firearm correctly. If I think they might not be able to, I go over all of the rules before I let them touch one

Russ Jackson
October 1, 2010, 02:39 PM
yeti,
While I leave certain guns loaded. I would never leave a loaded gun in a case where someone could just grab one. A display case is for displaying unloaded guns. Hiding a protection gun or guns is a whole different matter. He implied that the guns were in the open. By saying: Well he opened the case, picked up the gun making me think they were easily accessible. If I had a friend coming over to look at some guns they would be action open and set up to access. Not in a case. I would have control of my guns and he would access as I permitted. Especially if I had any reservations. As to loaded guns. Nobody would know there locations aside from me. Personally I think leaving loaded guns in a case is not proper....Russ

If I was wrong in my assumptions I am sorry. My intention was not to be offensive. It sounded like he normally had guns in a case that were easily accessible. As it sounded like he walked right up and grabbed one. Leading me to believe that next time he stopped by he might make himself at home and grab one which might be loaded.

TexasGunbie
October 1, 2010, 02:44 PM
Again my point. Much of what I'm seeing here is people too willing to walk away.

I don't have experience teaching gun safety but I tutor all levels of university math. From my teaching experience, some student give up too easily because they don't see the importance of it.
It's one thing to try your best and be a good example to your friends, but if they don't see the importance of it, they will not learn.

TexasGunbie
October 1, 2010, 02:54 PM
If I was wrong in my assumptions I am sure the OP will correct me. My intention was not to be offensive. It sounded like he normally had guns in a case that were easily accessible. As it sounded like he walked right up and grabbed one. Leading me to believe that next time he stopped by he might make himself at home and grab one which might be loaded.

Don't worry about it. I wasn't too concise in my original post anyways. So anyways... guns are in my safe, the only gun that's loaded is in my closet. But a friend was coming over, so I checked and made sure they were all empty, and brought them out of the safe to show him. I didn't have the slides lock back though the magazine is removed.

Russ Jackson
October 1, 2010, 03:02 PM
Then tell the guy you are going to take him to the range and teach him how to shoot and handle weapons. If you do not feel capable then a good firearm saftey class would be in order for the two of you. However I agree that some people should not handle guns ever. I have a brother that is that way....Russ

Vonderek
October 1, 2010, 03:02 PM
So I told him not to ever point a gun at anyone, and he said well it's empty anyways... I ask him how he would know, and so he went on to check the gun... while still pointing the gun at me the whole time.

This tells me that your friend is the type of person who takes umbrage at being corrected. No amount of patience or instruction will cure him of this...it is a character flaw. While none of us to some extent like having flaws exposed, most of us will accept the correction, alter behavior and learn from the experience. Mixing the type of person who will not accept correction with the potentially deadly business of shooting firearms is a recipe for disaster. I would never shoot with this person nor let him handle my firearms again. If he is a good friend I am sure you have other shared interests that you can take part in.

jeffmack
October 1, 2010, 03:02 PM
I had a roommate in college who was a complete meathead. I found out our university had a shooting club in the basement of our gymnasium, so I took him to the range.

We shot for 30 minutes to an hour. It was his first time, but he still shot like he was an imperial stormtrooper. We were shooting Anshultz .22 target rifles at big paper targets at about 25 yards. The other newbies did fine.

When I was sitting next to him watching him aim and realized that something had riccochetted off one of concrete ceiling supports 2/3's of the way downrange, I decided it was time to call it a day.

He's a doctor now. If I needed medical treatment for anything, even something as basic as having a rabid dog put down, I wouldn't go to him.

Manco
October 1, 2010, 03:10 PM
Yes, there are certain people I know who I strongly suspect would to try to scare me for fun by deliberately pointing a gun at me in jest, and things of that nature. :rolleyes: They may lack a certain type of maturity and/or have such an irreverent attitude that I seriously doubt they would respect firearms, and understand how utterly, completely serious I am--and everybody should be--about firearm safety. I will not tolerate any deliberate violations of the basic rules of safety whatsoever.

stchman
October 1, 2010, 03:10 PM
There are many idiots in this world. I know a few myself.

oldbanjo
October 1, 2010, 03:31 PM
Some people have no common sense and no matter how much they train they will still have no common sense. Some of these people are Cops and have shot holes in their car on more than one occasion. It's not safe to shot or hunt with these people, no matter how much training they have.

Sam1911
October 1, 2010, 03:44 PM
Again my point. Much of what I'm seeing here is people too willing to walk away. Then perhaps you're reading too much into a few of the comments ... like mine. As I said, I am very patient. I try to work WITH someone inexperienced to keep their little goofs from being serious mistakes. But if someone shows me -- or TELLS me -- that they're not interested in fixing a mistake and correcting the attitude that allows it to happen, then I am not under an obligation to remain with them in a fruitless hope that they will come around.

Further, I don't have the legal authority or the physical ability to force them to alter their behaviors. As I can't change someone who doesn't want to change, I can't possibly feel obligated to remain in a dangerous situation.

Also, people incapable of learning are mentally handicapped. So they're probably more of a danger to themselves in general. Not just a gun-range. Yes. You are correct. They probably are. I cannot be morally obligated to remain in their potential field of discharge, can I?

And what of those who are unwilling? If suggestions, pleas, and entreaties fall on deaf ears -- if the person simply says (through words or deeds), "I don't feel the dangers are real and I'm not going to treat this weapon with respect, no matter what you say," how can I in good conscience stay within range of their irresponsible behavior? I've got a family that needs me. My first duty is to them. Not to someone who willfully disregards instructions.

Passing the buck, shying away from responsibility.Pretty strong words considering you don't know me and have never observed my manner and protocols when working with new shooters.

Every person must have a threshold beyond which they will not risk life and limb for the sake of teaching the unwilling. Perhaps I won't work with someone who muzzle sweeps me more than once. Perhaps your threshold only is reached at the point of an ambulance ride. I assume that your "patience" would run out before you bleed, but who knows? The line exists somewhere for all of us. That isn't "passing the buck."

If this hypothetical person is as much of a danger as you seem to believe, then hopefully the person they eventually injure or kill isn't your friend or family. My life us one of opportunities. If I go through it statically, then I've failed. Yes. That is a horrible possibility. Hopefully a great many things don't happen to us or our loved ones. We'll try to mitigate them all as best as we can. At some point the risk to ourselves in the moment from someone either unable or unwilling to be responsible with a weapon is greater than the distantly potential risk that person might pose to someone else at some other time.

You can teach a lesson with all your skill and all your heart -- but that doesn't mean the student must learn and apply the lesson. If you've done the best you safely can, that is all you can do.

Sam1911
October 1, 2010, 03:53 PM
One more thought:

Deciding that we've passed my threshold for suffering the incompetent or unwilling can in itself be a part of the teaching process.

If I am instructing, there is a pretty good chance that I'm working on my range, and/or with my guns, and/or my ammo. That means that at any point in the exercises I can say, "No. That's wrong and dangerous. I am sorry, but I am not going to continue." And I can put my guns and ammo back in the case and escort the "student" from the range. That may make them embarrassed, even angry. But it also sends a pretty universal message that I'm deadly serious. In fact, it is just about the last resort I possibly have to get that message across, and it carries with it the positive virtue of taking me out of harm's way immediately.

Will the lesson get through? Impossible to say. But I have given the last full measure of instruction I can (short of corporal punishment :D). Now, if they want to "play" with guns and maybe endanger others, they're going to have to provide the guns, the ammo, and someplace to "play." The burden is as far off me as it could be, and who knows, maybe something I said on the way to the gate might just stick with them.

avs11054
October 1, 2010, 03:54 PM
I've got a friend who I won't ever take to the range again. The sad thing is that we've gone before and had a great time. But recently, he lost his job and became disabled.
He's recently threatened suicide twice. Even though he's getting help, I just could never trust myself to put a gun in his hand again.

Dnaltrop
October 1, 2010, 04:27 PM
I only give up once they attempt to Accident me to death.

Hell I got my Wife shooting! (Nobel prize please)

longhair75
October 1, 2010, 04:32 PM
I have mentioned it here before, but my brother, a former Marine, shot me in the leg once while trying to clear a jam on a rental pistol at his range.

I teased him about it for the rest of his life.....

Bonesinium
October 1, 2010, 04:35 PM
I have 3 roommates. One works in Law Enforcement, owns numerous guns, and I shoot with all the time. One like myself, is military, grew up around guns, and also owns a few firearms. The other has no experience with firearms at all.

I went to the range with my roommate in law enforcement and the roommate the doesn't shoot. I made a point to explain gun safety to him prior to going to the range. We were bringing a number of guns, (.308, .223, .45, .40, and .22lr). We bought him a box of .22's specifically because neither of us wanted him shooting anything else. Well...

1. I saw him swinging the gun around like Rambo pointing it straight in the air. I told him to keep it pointing down range. He said "it is", when clearly it was not.
2. He, without asking, grabbed the .40 to shoot, even when he had never fired a handgun before, and did so when we weren't looking.
3. Left a loaded .22, round chambered, pointing at us, on a table that he was told was specifically for unloaded firearms that we weren't shooting at the time, and tried to blame it on someone else.

I will never let him come to the range with me nevertheless handle firearms around me again.

Kodo
October 1, 2010, 04:47 PM
Hello, everyone! Long time lurker, first time posting.

I have only one friend I won't take shooting. She has a long history of breaking rules designed for safety; she's a terrible driver, aggressive and unrepentant. She's been in court for it twice, and I believe is currently on probation. She takes offense when people correct her actions, even if she's endangering someone else's life. I refuse to even get in a car with her, and there's no way I'd ever let her handle my firearms, or even be around her when she's handling them.

Onward Allusion
October 1, 2010, 04:55 PM
Yes, but unfortunately I did take him.

He was a complete newbie when I took him the first time. He followed all the rules and even managed to hit the target. He didn't own a gun at the time.

The 2nd time we went, he had just purchased a XDm in 9mm. I thought he was doing ok until he asked me if I wanted to shoot his pistol...with it pointing it at me and his finger on the trigger! :eek: I got so mad that I just about took it out of his hand and pistol whipped him with it! His response was...WHAT?! It's unloaded!!!

JohnBiltz
October 1, 2010, 04:56 PM
You can teach rules and techniques, you can't teach responsibility after childhood.

Sam1911
October 1, 2010, 06:45 PM
1. I saw him swinging the gun around like Rambo pointing it straight in the air...
2. He, without asking, grabbed the .40 to shoot, ...
3. Left a loaded .22, round chambered, pointing at us, ...

It sounds like this situation is past and too far gone for salvage at this point, bit it is incredibly illustrative of what I meant by providing a setting in which minor errors cannot become large-scale safety violations.

It is very rare when we shoot that there are multiple firearms just out on benches, uncased and in reach of a group. It also happens to be fairly rare for us that more than one shooter is "hot" on the line at once (our competition style arrangement usually dictates this).

Further, no new shooter would EVER have access to even one weapon without a coach or mentor right there at their elbow, walking them through the steps, providing direction, encouragement, and a very physical safety presence. (That means ready to put hands on the gun and STOP something from happening, RIGHT NOW, if need be.)

While we might assume someone without experience wouldn't grab a firearm off a bench, if that message isn't clear from the start -- in fact if the opportunity even exists -- why would they not? If someone isn't at their elbow saying, "Nice shot. Now, drop the magazine, lock back the slide, show me it's a clear weapon ... good... now place it on the bench, muzzle downrange," why would we ever assume they'd figure that out or remember to do it on their own?

I don't mean to be an unnecessarily harsh critic, but it sounds like you kind of set up your pal for failure. You didn't provide the layers of safety that the sport/hobby really requires in the beginning stages. Yeah, he was irresponsible and dangerous. But it doesn't sound like you were providing any attention to him at all -- and certainly weren't sending the messages (by words, actions, and body language) that this is a life-and-death serious matter.

If you set them up to have to work REALLY hard to screw up that badly -- THEN you can righteously blame them if they do. Otherwise, check yourself... A bench full of guns and ammo, two "experienced" shooters off concentrating on their own stuff, and a new guy left to figure things out for himself is a recipe for involuntary manslaughter!

mustang_steve
October 1, 2010, 06:55 PM
Yes, took him last year on his birthday....he kept leaving it on the bench loaded, and other bad behaviors.

He's a good friend of mine, but for safety's sake, he's not going back to the range with me until he gets a more disciplined mind, one that will be able to get past showboating and more on safety. One doesn't need excessive risk to have fun.

Old krow
October 1, 2010, 07:06 PM
To answer your question, yes... once.

Well how was he supposed to know the 4 rules if no one ever told him? Do your part and educate him. If he won't listen, then you have something to complain about.

I agree. Some of it should be common sense, but I also go over this regardless of whether or not they need it. If they will not listen you could be potentially putting yourself or others (who had no choice in you bring your guest to the range) in danger.

Further, no new shooter would EVER have access to even one weapon without a coach or mentor right there at their elbow, walking them through the steps, providing direction, encouragement, and a very physical safety presence. (That means ready to put hands on the gun and STOP something from happening, RIGHT NOW, if need be.)


I agree with that as well. At the range in which I am a member, we are responsible for our guests. I believe that it is the way it should be. It is my opinion that we as gun owners, shooters, and supporters of RKBA that we should take an active role in the safe operations of firearms, teaching safe operations, and our overall image.

On the flip side, I have a couple friends that have been shooting for a while. We go to the range quite a bit. We know the rules and we follow them. None of us are above safety. If I did something questionable I know that they would say something to me. I would not be offended. In my opinion, if someone has a blatant disregard for those rules, our safety, and the safety of the others on the range and it has been clearly explained to them, I will not take them nor go with them. We should consider other's safety as well. If some guy is taking his kids out to teach them to shoot he should not have to worry about someone that I took being a danger to those on the range.

Dookie
October 2, 2010, 12:44 AM
The first thing I do when a friend or acquaintance mentions they want to go shooting or buy a gun is that they should take a hunters safety course. The responsibility is to great to take a chance, I even tell them I will accompany them. A touch up of the rules never hurt anyone.

Plus if they fail the testing that is meant for a 12 year old that just means they are not responsible, or smart enough to own or shoot a gun. I tell them that first :)

dec41971
October 2, 2010, 05:06 AM
I have a few very anti friends who wouldn't go or touch one if I paid them to. Then there is this one flaky guy. Oh I offered to take him, he was very excited, but he is so flaky, I changed my mind about it. Smart engineer, but he scares the bejesus out of me with his irresponsibility surround all types of safety. He has the luck of the devil too all his stupid antics have never really resulted in him injuring anyone himself included, but as with all luck, it eventually runs out and your number comes up. I'd hate that to happen at a range, so my better judgment prevailed. :uhoh:

Sgt_R
October 2, 2010, 06:17 AM
I was shooting on my father in-law's property, and the neighbor came out to see what the commotion was about. One thing lead to another, and I offered to let the guy shoot a couple of our guns. Things went fairly well for a while, until he turned around and swept all three of us (father in-law, fiance, and myself) with a loaded 9mm, finger on the trigger.

Needless to say, I will never hand that man a loaded firearm again.

R

antiquus
October 2, 2010, 08:45 AM
Most people at public ranges make me nervous. Some of them will cause me to pick up my stuff and demand another lane far away.

OTOH, I have 8 year old kinfolk in WV (way up the hollers) that already know and handle guns safely and I never have to look twice.

TexasGunbie
October 2, 2010, 06:07 PM
Most people at public ranges make me nervous. Some of them will cause me to pick up my stuff and demand another lane far away.

Definitely, when I am at the range, I am always afraid of those that had recently purchased a gun and decided to take their girlfriend along, so both of them don't know what they are doing at all... then the guy is too proud to humbly admit he doesn't know jack at all... and since the guy didn't know what he's suppose to do, and the girl is relying on the guy to show him, usually you hear the guy say, "babe, just point and shoot."

anyways, I am very careful around those people.

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