Obligation to Disclose That You Carry When at Someone's House


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EnderWiggin
October 5, 2010, 04:40 PM
How do you guys feel about this? I have some family members that are terrified of guns for no good reason. Therefore, I have some questions:


Is it rude of me to go into their house while concealed carrying?
Should I let them know if I am?
If someone was concealed carrying while in your house would you want to know?


Now I know that I started this in reference to my family but I would like to know your opinions on the above mentioned questions in other houses as well such as friends, strangers, etc. Do you feel that it's none of their business no matter who they are? Do you feel that you should respect their fear of guns and not bring one into their house? These are the types of answers I am looking for.

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Mp7
October 5, 2010, 04:50 PM
I think it´s always good to honour the rules
of the host. Guns, smoking, drinking, pot ... whatever it may be.

As long as u have good friends, who bring good friends ....
it would not be my biz if someone carries a gun
or a knife ... its his choice.

With complete strangers, who want to show courtesy
by informing me ... they´d be welcome for the fact
that they let me choose ...

It´s a matter of streetwise IMO.

Just One Shot
October 5, 2010, 04:55 PM
For me it's,
No.
No.
&
No.

If it's concealed then it shouldn't be an issue.

If they have expressed the fact that they don't allow guns in thier house it's a simple matter for me not to visit them.

LHRGunslinger
October 5, 2010, 05:03 PM
My house, My rules. I feel it'd be good manners to ask. Lets say I was terrified of..., lets say plush bunnies, and you brought a plush bunny over without asking me I would be rather upset. Just clear whatever you're bringin over with them.

230therapy
October 5, 2010, 05:05 PM
Nope. My safety is none of their business.

dovedescending
October 5, 2010, 05:08 PM
I've stopped telling people. It's concealed for a reason. I don't want ANYBODY to know about it unless I need to use it. In which case, they'll be happy I have it.

:D I told my wife, when in doubt, just assume I've got a gun on, and don't mention it.

mstrat
October 5, 2010, 05:08 PM
I can only speak hypothetically, since I live in one of the only places in the country that bans all forms of carry.... but

If they say or otherwise communicate (e.g. signs) that guns aren't allowed in their house, I would definitely respect their wishes and wouldn't carry there (or alternatively, not visit at all).

But unless I've been forbidden from carrying, I would. It's concealed so they would never know anyway (unless it was ever needed, in which case they'd likely be thankful).

LubeckTech
October 5, 2010, 05:08 PM
Home or where ever if it is not posted it should not be an issue.
I frequently see people make comment about carrying in places that are posted "the most they can do is make you leave" - in some states that is trespassing and you can be arrested for it. The moral is know the laws of your state.

EnderWiggin
October 5, 2010, 05:10 PM
If they have expressed the fact that they don't allow guns in thier house it's a simple matter for me not to visit them.

This statement leads me to another question:
What if they never say they don't allow guns because they don't even know you own a gun?

Basically, my issue is that I do not want to disclose that I own a gun MUCH LESS let them know that I carry (my family would probably flip out). But it may be worse if they were to find out by accident while I am in their house (my gun prints or I lie down and part of it shows or they hug me and feel it, etc).

That also leads to another question which is:
Is it safer to let them know in case something happens (i.e. they decide they want to play a prank on you that entails pulling your pants down or anything stupid like that that may cause someone to come in contact with your firearm and possibly dislodge it from it's holster). This "prank" may not be the best example but it's enough to emphasize what I mean.

EDIT: Also, not visiting them is out of the question since they are family.

psyopspec
October 5, 2010, 05:18 PM
Everyone has a right to self-defense. A concealed handgun is often the most practical tool that can be carried in this vain. Therefore, no problem if it's my house. I won't ask, and I don't expect that information to be volunteered anymore than I'd expect someone to give me the details of their love life.

If I'm in someone else's house, I'll assume they also respect the right to self-defense unless informed otherwise. In that case (signs, or if it comes up in conversation) I'd remove myself and any carry weapons from the premises, and respect their wishes by not returning. I'm all for being principled, but if being part of the family means gathering at anti-gun Aunt Mae's once a year for Thanksgiving dinner, I'd leave the gun before going and deal with it for a couple hours.

What if they never say they don't allow guns because they don't even know you own a gun?

There's a time and a place to discuss your carry habits with people who aren't your gun buddies. The time is never. I'll let you figure out the place.

Basically, my issue is that I do not want to disclose that I own a gun MUCH LESS let them know that I carry (my family would probably flip out). But it may be worse if they were to find out by accident while I am in their house (my gun prints or I lie down and part of it shows or they hug me and feel it, etc).

Change your mode of carry to suit the occasion, or avoid the behaviors you're describing. Or if you're that bothered by the prospect, leave it in the car.

That also leads to another question which is:
Is it safer to let them know in case something happens (i.e. they decide they want to play a prank on you that entails pulling your pants down or anything stupid like that that may cause someone to come in contact with your firearm and possibly dislodge it from it's holster). This "prank" may not be the best example but it's enough to emphasize what I mean.

EDIT: Also, not visiting them is out of the question since they are family.

I've never had a family member pull my pants down, so I couldn't say.

elcaminoariba
October 5, 2010, 05:21 PM
* Is it rude of me to go into their house while concealed carrying?
* Should I let them know if I am?
* If someone was concealed carrying while in your house would you want to know?


1. No. They let you in. By definition they are declaring themselves to be hospitable. Part of being hospitable is accepting people the way they are or you wouldn't have let them in. People nowadays try to have everything both ways. They want to pretend to be hospitable (when it's convenient), and then micromanage things.

2. No. Do you tell people the color of your underwear when you walk into a home? Frankly it's none of their business. They let you in, they declared themselves to be hospitable, and part of being hospitable is giving people the benefit of the doubt when it comes to whatever is under their clothes. If you can't trust a person, DON'T LET THEM IN.

3. Of course I'd want to know, but then, the people I let in my house, I ALREADY know them well enough to answer this.

230therapy
October 5, 2010, 05:28 PM
EDIT: Also, not visiting them is out of the question since they are family.

Which brings up the "family" problem.

Don't be afraid to talk about it. Either they want your presence or not. They will compromise if they want you to attend.

I just refuse to bend. I lay out my rules for handling (none: it stays in the holster) and a gun in a holster is as safe as a car in a garage. If they make some comment about arguments causing violence, I just point to the knife rack and ask them how many people they've stabbed (I use that prop frequently and have these discussions in the kitchen). They get the idea that real life is different than what the TV would have them believe.

When this was pushed one time, I did not attend. It showed them that I was consistent in philosophy and behavior. Changing for convenience shows a lack of conviction. They know my established rules and if they schedule an event in a tyrannical state, they are knowingly excluding me. I have no problem with missing "Girls' Shopping Day in Leftist Central".

In general, I have found they would rather keep the peace and not talk about it (out of sight, out of mind) rather than have a confrontation. Concealed carry definitely works better in this case (though certain activists I know have made their families so numb they don't notice OC). However, in one instance, I did offer a compromise by moving the location of the event. It was turned down, permission "granted" and nothing else was said. That's about as good as it gets with commie libtard family members who are out to screw me of my property and rights (other than avoiding certain topics of conversation).

Just One Shot
October 5, 2010, 05:31 PM
This statement leads me to another question:
What if they never say they don't allow guns because they don't even know you own a gun?
If it's not stated then it wouldn't be something that would concern me.

Basically, my issue is that I do not want to disclose that I own a gun MUCH LESS let them know that I carry (my family would probably flip out). But it may be worse if they were to find out by accident while I am in their house (my gun prints or I lie down and part of it shows or they hug me and feel it, etc).
You can come up with a million hypothetical situations but remember, it's called concealed for a reason. If you are doing it right they should never find out. I wouldn't worry about crossing that bridge until I got to it.

That also leads to another question which is:
Is it safer to let them know in case something happens (i.e. they decide they want to play a prank on you that entails pulling your pants down or anything stupid like that that may cause someone to come in contact with your firearm and possibly dislodge it from it's holster). This "prank" may not be the best example but it's enough to emphasize what I mean.
The thing is, my immediate family all know I carry. They've known I've had guns since I was 14 years old.

I don't have to worry about these kind of pranks with my friends and family. They're not juvenile enough to try something with the old man.

If I were visiting distant relatives and they found out during a hug or what not I would just ignore their questions until they got the hint. If they persisted in grilling me I would just pull out my CC permit and show it to them.

If they still had a problem I would lock it in my car safe while I was on that visit but it would more than likely be the last time they saw me at thier house family or not.

When questioned about why I'm not visiting anymore I would simply explain that they are welcome to come and visit me at my house but I won't be back because I felt less than welcome the last time I was at thier home.

wvshooter
October 5, 2010, 05:37 PM
Do they require everyone who enters their home to pass through a metal detector? Or is there a possibility they may ask you to remove your clothes while you are in their home? Or is there a possibility they may frisk you while you are there? Are they going to pat you down?

On a more serious note are they the kind of people that would ask you if you are carrying a weapon while you are in their home? If the answer is yes you have no business being there IMO. Your duty to your own safety is way more important than your duty to visit anyone.

How did they find out you carry a gun anyway? The first rule of concealed carry has always been keep it to yourself. That old saying, "Always carry, never tell" really works. I've been in friends homes many times and never had a problem because I never told anybody I carry a loaded gun.

OMG! A loaded gun!!! Run for the hills!

elcaminoariba
October 5, 2010, 05:38 PM
Which brings up the "family" problem.
The rules of hospitality I mentioned apply to family (meaning if they let you in then they declared themselves to have hospitality towards you). Sometimes some family members must be avoided. If they "can't" be avoided but should be avoided, then they are the type of giant pain in the a__ who creates problems, who won't mind their own business, and who are not worth telling if you are carrying. If this type is so hostile that they ASK every time you're in their house, then you answer honestly and they will either back off or do you a favor by asking you to leave.

JoeShmoe
October 5, 2010, 05:45 PM
When a confrontation can be avoided, it is wise to avoid it. If you had a difference of opinion with your family regarding politics, or religion, would you bring it up? You would probably keep your views to yourself, as you should with the fact that you are carrying concealed.

It is not rude to carry concealed, anywhere that you can legally do so, and there is no need to tell anyone about it.

Shadow 7D
October 5, 2010, 05:52 PM
Depends where you live, some places like Alaska, it is mandatory that you expressly obtain permission of an adult resident or owner of the residence before entering failing to do so is weapons misconduct in the 5th...

So it may be mandatory, as for where it's not, really don't see a reason to if it's going to cause a problem, but if you are staying as an invited guest (more than a short in/out) then yes you probably want to let them know that you are LEGALLY armed, and reassure them that it won't cause any problems, so there is no surprises.

Gottahaveone
October 5, 2010, 06:38 PM
I have no choice. SC law expressly requires that I inform the homeowner before entering their house with a concealed weapon. It has severely limited my visitation to the homes of "casual" acquaintances. If it's not someone who is a good enough friend to already know that I am liable to be carrying, I generally don't go see them.

Adds a whole new twist to being invited in by someone new after a particularly good date, too. I tend to handle that by telling them "I'd love to come in, but state law requires that I tell you something first." You can see the wheels turning as they start to think I'm about to blurt out that I'm a registered sex offender or something. When I tell them that I am armed, the relief of it being "only" that generally makes it easy to move past it.

I would REALLY prefer that this decision be left to my judgment as to when to disclose, but unfortunately that's not the case.

230therapy
October 5, 2010, 06:41 PM
Somehow, I have a feeling there is much civil disobedience regarding South Carolina's very stupid law.

FriedRice
October 5, 2010, 07:26 PM
Enderwiggin, I feel ya. I'm new to this, and all enthusiastic, and I told some people that I didn't know were anti-s. It was bad. I'll leave it at that. Then there were some people I HAD to tell because of safety issues I won't go into. It was very hard for them. They were both anti-s. I stopped talking about it with one and once he figured out I hadn't lost my mind and decided to run around capping people for fun, he chilled out. Now he doesn't seem to care much and we don't talk about it.

The other one was harder. I had to try and get her on board because we are BOTH at risk if she didn't know. Her early experiences with guns were awful. She believed in non-violence. She thought guns were bad. And she was a smart person. She just hadn't explored what these stances were about. Many said "give up and shut up about it, just carry," however I kept at it more gently. She's moved from anti- to non and is kicking butt in a Krav Maga class now. She 100% supports my carrying choice and she's got my back with the Krav Maga. She hadn't done the emotional work to overcome being a victim. When people are victimized enough, sometimes they stop fighting back. Now she's fighting back against every person that ever assaulted her, raped her, cheated on her, it's all coming out! And I just sit over here and smile. Some anti-s are that way because of complicated reasons. I don't know what you should do. This is just what I've done.

The friends that couldn't get past it, I don't hang out with anymore. I rarely visit people at their houses. I prefer my own turf. Out in public, it's concealed to everyone. Some of my family know, the gunners. However, all my family is out of state so it's a non-issue.

SharpsDressedMan
October 5, 2010, 07:43 PM
Don't ask, don't tell. I woud limit my friends to those that know I carry and respect my freedom to do so. If I have (soon to be "had") a friend that told me not to come armed into their house, I would honor that request, and leave...for good. My life is too short to go where I am not wanted, and where I no longer have respect for someone else's rules.

SharpsDressedMan
October 5, 2010, 07:49 PM
By having to inform potential love interests early on about being armed (when they are about to "invite you in") must really cut to the chase. On the other hand, it might very quickly eliminate wasted time on a burning anti that is never going to get over it. Setting the ground rules early on is usually NOT a bad idea.

M2 Carbine
October 5, 2010, 08:05 PM
My house, my rules.
If you don't like my rules stay out.


I feel the same when going to someone elses place.


When friends visit me, if they don't have a gun I'll loan them one.:)

wow6599
October 5, 2010, 08:28 PM
No.......unless they ask me.

JoeSlomo
October 5, 2010, 08:43 PM
Depends where you live, some places like Alaska, it is mandatory that you expressly obtain permission of an adult resident or owner of the residence before entering failing to do so is weapons misconduct in the 5th.

Interesting.

That would make me far less social than I already am.

:D

My approach is to always act in accordance with the law. My state makes no such notification required, hence, I make no such notification upon entering a private residence.

SlamFire1
October 5, 2010, 09:26 PM
Just check your guns before you enter the house unless your bud and his wife are also gun nuts.

Yes, the neighbors and all the people outside could turn into zombies, or your friends could turn into zombies, and you would have to shoot your way out, but I doubt it.

Leave the grenades, rocket launchers, death rays all in the car.

Old krow
October 5, 2010, 09:40 PM
Before I say anything I should explain this so that it is not taken out of context. I don't have any friends that are "anti" nor is my family, so it's a bit of a mute point.

1. My mom and sister have no problems with it and I do not say anything anything anymore, it's just assumed. I think that my mom is a little happier when I am. My friends, same thing. Everyone else... explain to me again why was over there?

2. If my mom did have a problem with it, I would honor it. I can't chose my family. The rest I can chose.

Frankly it's none of their business.

3. It is if you're in my house. My house, my rules. "In God we trust, all others we monitor, jam, or deceive." The people that I associate with operate under a blanket agreement that we carry. I will not ask them, I know them, I shoot with them, and I assume that they are. However, I know them, the trust and safety issues have been addressed otherwise they wouldn't be in this group to start with.

If I didn't know someone, then yes, they have to tell me. I do not automatically trust them. It's more of a situational awareness thing than a "micro management" thing. Their safety is secondary to my own or that of my family. I don't assume that someone is safe with a firearm just because they have one. The military and the range has cured me of that. But, this is for people whom I do not know that I did invite into my house... the odds are very very remote. If I was carrying, I was doing it to be safe, why on earth would I go into a house with no guns in the first place?

No. Do you tell people the color of your underwear when you walk into a home?

The next time underwear accidentally (negligent) discharges and kills someone it might be an issue. :D

All in all, I would avoid this altogether. That's just me, and it is an OPINION, except for the my house my rules part.

oldbanjo
October 5, 2010, 10:11 PM
By SC rules you have too. I didn't say I did.

VinnAY
October 5, 2010, 11:18 PM
I think its a matter of respect or the lack thereof that causes someone to disrespect another's home whether they're gun friendly or not. If you don't have express permission to carry in their home, you shouldn't do it no matter what. IF that makes you drop friends or family I guess that that's your personal decision. But I see it as very disrespectful to not ask permission.
I don't carry around my niece and nephew (3 and 7yrs old), here or at their home. I'm down on the ground rough housing them or one or both on my lap watching TV, it's just not appropriate. I leave my roscoe in the car. Their town is a crap town in my opinion and I really won't go there without my piece and I quite clearly say that to most anyone that'll listen, butt it stays in the car at their house.

bigalexe
October 5, 2010, 11:36 PM
Guys I don't even think this warrants a thread but:

Exhibit 1: Castle Laws, based on the idea that one is the ruler of their residence. We like them.

Exhibit 2: Common Courtesy, you are a guest in someones home and should recognize their rules.

Exhibit 3: If you enter my home and are armed I wonder what you are up to, I am not a scary person and do not believe one should need to be armed and feel threatened by me so you must be planning to harm me. I can secure my own home (or choose not to), and in my home I expect you to respect my policies.

Side-Note: If you inform me you are armed and CC then I would not object to you entering my home, if you enter my home and fail to disclose CC then you will see the wrong end of my shotgun barrel.

Rusty Shackleford
October 5, 2010, 11:53 PM
Let's see here. I have some extremely progressive family members. Most of them I get along with very well, and one of them is a close uncle of mine. When I invite them over, I understand they may very well make some political comments that I find insane. They are also likely to bring hippie type products with them that I do not agree with(like pot). They also do activities that I find downright strange and sometimes offensive(sexually suggestive yoga).

Yet I invite them over and enjoy their company anyway. I knew about these things when I invited them over and accept that it will be something I live with while they are visitors.

They know about my conservative fiscal views and that I think the US Government has gone insane. They know I support a strict constitutional view and yet they enjoy my company when I visit them. They are nothing but hospitable and I assume they would be the same way if they knew I was a gunny.

I just choose to keep it from them so we don't have to get into a political discussion about it with me being vastly outnumbered.

Robert
October 5, 2010, 11:53 PM
I am respectful of my host, his home, and his wishes when I am in his home. My right to carry does not trump his right to run his home as he sees fit. I have some non gun friendly friends that know I carry. As long as it stays concealed, as it should be, there is no issue.

I try to use this situation as education and teaching situations. My wife has some friends that are just plain gun ignorant so I try to take the scary out of it for them.

I, after informing the home owner that I am carrying, have never been asked to lock it in the car or leave. Mutual respect goes a long, long way.

ArmedBear
October 5, 2010, 11:58 PM
Some people I know would assume that I am carrying, so there's no need to tell them. I assume they're carrying, too, though with an AR in the corner and a pistol on the dining room table, maybe they see no reason to have a gun holstered, too.

Others might assume I'm carrying, or not, or they might not even think of it, but as long as they don't bring it up, I don't, either. I also don't ask for their permission to carry a pocket knife, a garage door opener or credit cards.

Let's stop treating guns like some magical things. They're not.

I don't carry if I'm going to be drinking more than a glass of wine with dinner or something. I don't plan to plink in somebody's living room. If they see the gun, it'll be in such a situation as they'll be glad I have it. Otherwise, they won't see it any more than they'll see the medical insurance card in my wallet.

Zundfolge
October 6, 2010, 12:35 AM
I don't believe that anything under my clothing is anyone else's business. If I was one that preferred not to wear underwear would a home owner have a right to demand I go home and put some briefs on first? Do I need to run my underwear choices by every homeowner I visit? What if I had a tattoo on my backside and I was entering the home of someone that believed they were a sin? Do I need to get a list of all prohibited/approved items one could possibly carry in their pocket or under their clothes? For that matter should I ask every homeowner I visit what prohibited/approved ideas I'm allowed to carry into their home in my head?

And don't give me this bushwa about how firearms are somehow different...that's anti BS.

If someone told me expressly that they didn't want any guns in their house then I'd just not go there (even if they're family ... I have family I no longer talk to because of their stupid political beliefs) but I'm certainly not asking for anyone's permission or putting them in the position where they have to give/deny permission (note that I don't live in South Carolina or Alaska).


The next time underwear accidentally (negligent) discharges and kills someone it might be an issue. :DModern firearms simply DO NOT GO OFF unless you're fiddling with them ... which means they're no longer concealed under your clothes.

So a negligent discharge would be the equivalent of taking your tightey whiteys off and rubbing your tread-marks on the good china.

Side-Note: If you inform me you are armed and CC then I would not object to you entering my home, if you enter my home and fail to disclose CC then you will see the wrong end of my shotgun barrel. At which point YOU go to jail for assault with a deadly weapon ... and if we're related that's a domestic violence conviction and you no longer have a shotgun (or any gun) EVER AGAIN FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE.

Mountainman38
October 6, 2010, 01:05 AM
I carry a gun for a reason, and that's protection. If I'm going somewhere that I think I need to carry it (such as a trip across the state), and I'm going to a friends house where they don't like guns (my wife has such a friend, who expressly said I wasn't to bring a gun in her house), I'm not going to go unprotected just to cater to their misguided sense of entitlement. Sure, I could leave it in the car while we're sleeping in the house, but this doesn't seem reasonable to me. What if the car got broken into and the gun stolen? What if the house got broken into, and I didn't have a way to protect my family?

Same goes for restaurants that forbid patrons to carry on the premises, even though it's not a state law. If you put up a metal detector, I won't come eat there. If not, don't ask, don't tell.

John Locke
October 6, 2010, 01:18 AM
I usually don't tell people that I am carrying concealed. This avoids the whole problem, since it never becomes an issue, and it also means that we never get a chance to discuss whether they mind me carrying or even whether they're afraid of guns or not.

If I know they don't want people carrying in their house, I'd have a hard choice whether to carry regardless or whether to just not go. However, for the above reasons, I've never had the chance to find out :-)

Me, I don't care if people are carrying at my place, so I don't want to know - it's their right to carry and I wouldn't presume to tell them otherwise.

John Locke
October 6, 2010, 01:24 AM
My house, My rules. I feel it'd be good manners to ask. Lets say I was terrified of..., lets say plush bunnies, and you brought a plush bunny over without asking me I would be rather upset. Just clear whatever you're bringin over with them.
You'd be upset if you ever saw it. You'd be none the wiser if you didn't know it was under their clothes, in their pants, etc.

Old krow
October 6, 2010, 01:45 AM
Modern firearms simply DO NOT GO OFF unless you're fiddling with them ... which means they're no longer concealed under your clothes.


Exactly! I'm not afraid of guns at all. People on the other hand...

Exhibit 1: Castle Laws, based on the idea that one is the ruler of their residence. We like them.

Exactly...again. If I knew you already then you didn't have to ask, I assumed that you were carrying. Point being, it's my choice to make.

John Locke
October 6, 2010, 01:47 AM
If I didn't know someone, then yes, they have to tell me. I do not automatically trust them. It's more of a situational awareness thing than a "micro management" thing. Their safety is secondary to my own or that of my family. I don't assume that someone is safe with a firearm just because they have one. The military and the range has cured me of that.

But why? If they're carrying and you don't find out about it, how is your safety jeopardized? It's no different than being outside with those same people. As long as they don't pull the gun out or handle it in an unsafe way, there is no problem, and if they do, then you can ask them to leave (and if they just pull it out without warning, and they're not friends of yours, I assume you're drawing as well).

John Locke
October 6, 2010, 01:51 AM
I think its a matter of respect or the lack thereof that causes someone to disrespect another's home whether they're gun friendly or not. If you don't have express permission to carry in their home, you shouldn't do it no matter what. IF that makes you drop friends or family I guess that that's your personal decision. But I see it as very disrespectful to not ask permission.
I don't carry around my niece and nephew (3 and 7yrs old), here or at their home. I'm down on the ground rough housing them or one or both on my lap watching TV, it's just not appropriate. I leave my roscoe in the car. Their town is a crap town in my opinion and I really won't go there without my piece and I quite clearly say that to most anyone that'll listen, butt it stays in the car at their house.
Wait, how is it not appropriate to be armed just because you're handling children? The gun is concealed, the kids never get to it - what's the big deal? It's not like it's going to go off by itself and hurt a child, and you know you're not going to do so too.

In my opinion, what guests to my house carry in their pockets is none of my business, as long as it's not illegal and that it stays there. If any of these two things is not true, then it becomes my business, at which point I have the decision whether to ask them to leave or not.

John Locke
October 6, 2010, 01:53 AM
Guys I don't even think this warrants a thread but:

Exhibit 1: Castle Laws, based on the idea that one is the ruler of their residence. We like them.

Exhibit 2: Common Courtesy, you are a guest in someones home and should recognize their rules.

Exhibit 3: If you enter my home and are armed I wonder what you are up to, I am not a scary person and do not believe one should need to be armed and feel threatened by me so you must be planning to harm me. I can secure my own home (or choose not to), and in my home I expect you to respect my policies.

Side-Note: If you inform me you are armed and CC then I would not object to you entering my home, if you enter my home and fail to disclose CC then you will see the wrong end of my shotgun barrel.
Exhibit 3: If you enter my home and are armed I wonder what you are up to, I am not a scary person and do not believe one should need to be armed and feel threatened by me so you must be planning to harm me. I can secure my own home (or choose not to), and in my home I expect you to respect my policies.


That's wrong, though. I'm not carrying to my friends' houses because I think my friends will attack me. I carry because I want to be protected on my way there and back, and also in case an armed home invasion happens while I'm there.

General Geoff
October 6, 2010, 02:11 AM
Their safety is secondary to my own or that of my family. I don't assume that someone is safe with a firearm just because they have one.
I assume someone is safe with a firearm they own until they prove otherwise, just as I assume someone who owns a car is relatively safe with it. If I didn't, I would have died of stress long ago just from driving to work and back every day.


Side-Note: If you inform me you are armed and CC then I would not object to you entering my home, if you enter my home and fail to disclose CC then you will see the wrong end of my shotgun barrel.
On the rare occasion that I carry concealed (I usually open carry), I consider it nobody else's business that I'm armed, any more than it is their business what color underwear I have on. Do you prefer that guests in your home inform you ahead of time that they're wearing polka dot undies? And if you find out later that they are, and they didn't inform you, you would aim a deadly weapon at them?


Bottom line is that I could care less if someone I invited into my home is armed or not; being armed does not make a person more likely to be a threat.

psyopspec
October 6, 2010, 04:44 AM
I've been thinking about this some more since I first posted, and I've come to the conclusion that guests in my home may assume that their individual rights are intact unless told otherwise. Since I've lived on my own, I can recall only one occasion on which I asked a guest to leave, and it involved racial comments with an intention of inciting a physical fight. Make a mockery of my home in front of me and my guests, you get asked to tone it down or leave.

As for guns, I assume everyone is armed. If they are not, so be it. If they are, then my expectations are fulfilled. Either way they're getting treated as the latter.

JohnBiltz
October 6, 2010, 05:01 AM
I think there are people I would rather not have armed in my house and people I don't care if they are armed. In either event it is still my house, my rules, my castle. If I ask you not to carry, ditch the gun or leave or my shotgun will be soon be pointing at you and the cops will arrive. I have an aunt who insists upon dragging her horrid little dog with her everywhere she goes, it isn't coming in either. If you don't want me to carry tell me and I'll leave and will not be back. If I can't for some reason say because I did not drive or something I'll take it off. Its your right to do so and I will respect it. Its your house, your rules and your castle. I won't be back but it doesn't change anything.

General Geoff
October 6, 2010, 05:11 AM
If I ask you not to carry, ditch the gun or leave or my shotgun will be soon be pointing at you and the cops will arrive. I have an aunt who insists upon dragging her horrid little dog with her everywhere she goes, it isn't coming in either. If you don't want me to carry tell me and I'll leave and will not be back. If I can't for some reason say because I did not drive or something I'll take it off. Its your right to do so and I will respect it. Its your house, your rules and your castle. I won't be back but it doesn't change anything.
I don't contest your right as owner of the property to ask anyone to leave for any reason; I question the logic behind wanting certain people to be unarmed in your home. Anyone I wouldn't trust with a gun, I wouldn't really want in my house at all.

cassandrasdaddy
October 6, 2010, 05:21 AM
without or against their approval/knowledge, how many of you would get all butt hurt if they noticed and ordered you out? and didn't say please?

CZguy
October 6, 2010, 06:17 AM
I don't contest your right as owner of the property to ask anyone to leave for any reason; I question the logic behind wanting certain people to be unarmed in your home. Anyone I wouldn't trust with a gun, I wouldn't really want in my house at all.

That sounds perfectly logical to me.

pockets
October 6, 2010, 07:46 AM
Wow, there sure is a lot of preoccupation with underwear here.

If people should respect 'my home my rules', it should be reciprocal when it's 'their home their rules'. Whether or not I agree with their rules.

Travis McGee
October 6, 2010, 08:22 AM
I don't show them my underwear, my wallet or its contents or my concealed weapons.

oldbanjo
October 6, 2010, 08:29 AM
I would never have a problem with someone having a gun CC on them in my house, CWP doesn't matter to me, what does matter is the gun must stay on you and not be shown to anyone. I don't trust too many people handling guns, stupid things happen.

ArmedBear
October 6, 2010, 09:39 AM
how many of you would get all butt hurt if they noticed and ordered you out?

That's their right.

I just don't ask permission for a laundry list of things before I enter a house. Most of the time, they're a non-issue because nobody mentions them.

There's no expectation that someone carrying concealed will inform anyone, at least here. That's not part of standard etiquette.

If you don't want me to wear shoes in your house, that's fine. But you have to tell me; I'm not going to ask if there's no reason to ask. I also won't ask whether you have any problem with atheists, or libertarians, or dog lovers. Furthermore, certain things would cause me to leave someone's house, with the clear indication that I was leaving because I thought that the resident was a jerk that I wouldn't lower myself to spending any more time with.

That stuff works both ways. But unless there is a particular etiquette about something, we don't all present anyone with a list of rules when they enter our homes, or we enter theirs. If I don't want Mormons in my house, it's my business to tell people up front; it's not their obligation to ask.

Guns are not magical things. A lot of people carry concealed, and nobody ever mentions it unless there's a good reason.

I expect people to keep any potentially-dangerous items safe from the prying hands of children, and I expect to do the same. But that's got little or nothing to do with firearms, specifically.

You know, I think the question itself comes from a childish perception of firearms. I had it, too, at first. But after you carry on a fairly-regular basis, and you meet other grownups who do, also, you stop getting all giddy whenever you carry. It becomes routine, and you don't think about it much. When you get to that point, it seems downright strange to think that you would have to go around telling people you have your gun whenever you pass through a doorway.

Jamyatunes
October 6, 2010, 10:31 AM
I would say with friends and family that know you are a responsible person, there is no need to inform them and make a possible issue out of it. All of my friends assume I'm carrying, as do their (sometimes liberal) wives. We all just don't talk about it.

As for the "strangers" question, I would say absolutely notify them. Or better yet, do not go into strangers' homes at all. If I allow you in under the claim that you are a traveling salesman or Jehovah's Witness, and I notice you have a gun things are going to get very uncomfortable. People have been robbed and murdered by people claiming to be salesmen, repairmen, etc; and I'm not going to appreciate you carrying in my house if I don't know you.

doc2rn
October 6, 2010, 10:43 AM
My house my rules.........Everybody better be packin seems like the way to go! Poker night is always fun!

shockwave
October 6, 2010, 11:26 AM
A couple of thoughts...

If they make some comment about arguments causing violence, I just point to the knife rack and ask them how many people they've stabbed

No, and let's please stop this silly analogy. It sounds dumb the first time you hear it, and it doesn't get better with repetition. A firearm is not a knife. It's a firearm.

I carry because I want to be protected on my way there and back, and also in case an armed home invasion happens while I'm there.

Yeah. Doncha hate that? You're sitting around, watching the football game, and an armed home invasion breaks out. Then, after you clean up all that mess, you're out having a barbecue in the backyard and - whoops-a-daisy! Another violent armed home invasion occurs. Later on, at the end of the evening, you're saying your good-byes in the foyer and, yep, as usual, armed home invasion.

There's some people I know that I really like, and they have nice dinner parties, but I've stopped visiting them because of all the pesky armed home invasions they have. The dress code can be tough, too: white tie and ski mask. Nobody sells white ski masks anymore. And you ever try to get duct tape adhesive off a metal watch band? I'm tellin' ya...

The etiquette on all this, by the way, is that the homeowner gets to make the rules. If I'm visiting somebody's house, chances are that I won't be arming myself. If I do have a gun with me, I'll probably leave it in the car. Seems discourteous to the host to walk around his house with a sidearm on, but if it was somebody like Hickok45, then we'd probably go out shooting in back of the house and that'd be a different story.

SSN Vet
October 6, 2010, 12:00 PM
Sounds like I'm the odd man out...

I won't carry a concealed weapon into someone else's home unless I know that they are o.k. with it. If I don't know for sure, I leave it at home or in the car. If I need to ask, then I obviously don't know for sure, and will default to leaving it secure in my home or vehicle.

I enjoy shooting sports. I have at times hunted or used guns to eliminate pesky vermin, I deploy firearms as a vital part of my personal security strategy. And I have strong views on the constitutional freedoms that guarantee my right to bear arms.

Yet guns are not the central, defining element of who I am.

So I don't feel the need to bring the subject of guns into every human interaction, or to seek opportunities to announce my opinions and views about gun laws, or to liberally sprinkle gun lingo into every conversation.

Fortunately, I live in a free state which has a historically strong hunting culture and also has one of the lowest crime rates in the union. I don't think I take gun rights or gun culture for granted, but rather, I simply enjoy those rights and the freedom to do or not to do. I guess it's different in other parts of the country, so I'm not going to chuck stones.

Corporal K
October 6, 2010, 12:42 PM
Yet guns are not the central, defining element of who I am.

So I don't feel the need to bring the subject of guns into every human interaction, or to seek opportunities to announce my opinions and views about gun laws, or to liberally sprinkle gun lingo into every conversation

I'm with you SSN.

skipbadger
October 6, 2010, 12:47 PM
So many posters are saying, "My house, my rules". Where is it you post these rules? How do you communicate these rules to folks that come over?

The only rule I ever heard any home owner proclaim was that they like to have everyone take off their shoes when they enter the house.

But if it isn't the law to request permission to enter someone's home with a concealed firearm, why would one ever ask? How would it come up in conversation? How would anyone ever know?

Concealed is concealed as long as its legal. I don't ask if my small folding knife is OK. I don't ask if my leatherman squirt is OK. I don't ask if my NRA membership card is OK. And to keep on this underwear theme, I DEFINITELY don't ask if it is OK if I wear my wife's panties in their house either... :what:

And for those of you who no longer talk to family members simply because you don't agree with their politics, I feel sorry for you. You are missing out on some wonderful relationships. I hope it is worth it for you. It probably isn't though.

And one more thing to a previous poster. A holstered firearm IS safer than a car in a garage! At least the 2 house fires where I knew the homeowners would lead me to believe that.

MinnMooney
October 6, 2010, 12:57 PM
from post #3 :
For me it's,
No.
No.
&
No.

If it's concealed then it shouldn't be an issue.

If they have expressed the fact that they don't allow guns in thier house it's a simple matter for me not to visit them.

I agree with all except the "not to visit them" part. If they're good friends I'd respect their wishes. I would, however, try to get them to change their mind.

NavyLCDR
October 6, 2010, 01:02 PM
Yeah. Doncha hate that? You're sitting around, watching the football game, and an armed home invasion breaks out. Then, after you clean up all that mess, you're out having a barbecue in the backyard and - whoops-a-daisy! Another violent armed home invasion occurs. Later on, at the end of the evening, you're saying your good-byes in the foyer and, yep, as usual, armed home invasion.

There's some people I know that I really like, and they have nice dinner parties, but I've stopped visiting them because of all the pesky armed home invasions they have. The dress code can be tough, too: white tie and ski mask. Nobody sells white ski masks anymore. And you ever try to get duct tape adhesive off a metal watch band? I'm tellin' ya...

I went to work one morning at 5:00am. At 5:05am one or more persons jumped my fence and entered my backyard. My three dogs ran out the doggie door and chased him/them out of my backyard. Thinkig I must have locked the dogs in the back yard, the perp(s) then proceeded to kick the front door in to my house and entered. My wife (now-ex) was sitting in the living room at the time and screamed. The dogs re-entered the house through the doggie door and chased him/them out of the house.

Your argument does not particularly carry a whole lot of weight with me.

Old krow
October 6, 2010, 01:31 PM
Your argument does not particularly carry a whole lot of weight with me.

I think that the poster was referring to people actually entering his home invited for a BBQ or what not and there being an invasion. In your case it's pretty much clear cut that they were not invited.

But if it isn't the law to request permission to enter someone's home with a concealed firearm, why would one ever ask? How would it come up in conversation? How would anyone ever know?

Simple, if I knew them I wouldn't ask them in the first place. If I didn't know them, I probably wouldn't invite them in the first place, but if I did I 'd ask, I'd expect them answer. Most of my friends have at some point in the past asked me. Now they no longer ask me.

I assume someone is safe with a firearm they own until they prove otherwise, just as I assume someone who owns a car is relatively safe with it. If I didn't, I would have died of stress long ago just from driving to work and back every day.

Anywhere but my house I would too. I try to keep assumption at a minimum here.

And for those of you who no longer talk to family members simply because you don't agree with their politics, I feel sorry for you.

I agree. I'm not likely going to abandon my 84 y/o grandmother because she doesn't like guns.

It's an interesting topic

X-Rap
October 6, 2010, 01:33 PM
I have no problem with someone bringing their gun into my home so long as its not removed from its holster for no reason and if they are staying it is secured from any kids when not carried. That is how I conduct myself at someone elses house. Sure there are times when guns are drawn and looked at being passed around by those interested but that is at the place and time decided by the host.
If there is a ND expect to get a first class ass whipping on your way out the door.

vikinggirl
October 6, 2010, 03:01 PM
Came to this thread a bit late - its already on page 3! But wanted to mention if carrying concealed and having to hug someone....
My uncle always takes a gun with him when he leaves his house and usually wears it in the front. For years at family gatherings that might require hugging, he would lean forward and hug with the arms only, keeping the rest of his body well away. As a child I always thought he had a back problem, until as a teenager my dad explained that was to keep his gun away from other people. My first thought was never 'oh he's got a gun' and I'm sure other folks don't realize as well.
If its concealed properly I think its no one's business.

MrOldLude
October 6, 2010, 03:09 PM
My gun is less important than my friends.

I'd feel like a fool is I chose my gun over them. So I'd just not tell them.

labhound
October 6, 2010, 04:33 PM
I agree with SSN Vet's post #55 100%.

CZguy
October 6, 2010, 04:57 PM
I've carried for three years now, and to me this has been a non issue. The decision to carry is a private matter, (to me) and the subject does not need to come up if I have a firearm in someone else's home, except in the very unlikely chance that I would need to use it. Then I would assume that my host would be grateful that I had had it.

MisterMike
October 6, 2010, 05:20 PM
I just don't talk about it, and I give no one any reason to think I might be carrying. Some friends know that I am a retired LEO and assume that because of my current position I may carry. They sometimes half-jokingly ask about it and I always half-jokingly give them a non-answer.

If a true friend knew and asked me not to carry in his or her home, I would certainly not do so. If a more casual acquaintance knew--truthfully, an improbable scenario--and asked me not to carry in his home, I'd respect that, but that might be expressed by a decision to excuse myself.

However, I truthfully don't get the notion of telling others that you carry a concealed weapon. I truthfully think that this generally happens when a person wants to convey to others that they are James Bond-cool. Instead, they come across as Pee-Wee Herman-dorky.

Just One Shot
October 6, 2010, 05:22 PM
I agree with all except the "not to visit them" part. If they're good friends I'd respect their wishes. I would, however, try to get them to change their mind.

I like to keep things simple.

It's like this, my good friends all know.

If they're anti's, then they'll never be my GOOD friends.
:uhoh:
:)

mgkdrgn
October 6, 2010, 07:08 PM
You might want to look into your state laws ... you may be -required- to let them know. You are in South Carolina.

But then, everybody I know is already aware that if I have pants on, I'm armed.

EnderWiggin
October 6, 2010, 07:27 PM
Thank you all for your inputs.

A lot of you are saying that it's none of their business but people that are not familiar with concealed carry would argue otherwise since they view firearms as safety hazards. I am not saying they are correct to think this way but hey, that's just how it is. So for my family, me bringing a "safety hazard" into their house may not be received well. If everyone was educated on concealed carry then yes, I would agree that the "it's none of their business" argument would make sense.

Also, others argue that it should be concealed anyways so there is no way of them finding out. Well, with an IWB holster there is always something you can do that will make your firearm print, unless you are wearing a heavy jacket. Therefore, there is always a chance that you stretch or bend a certain way that will cause the firearm to print and them to find out.

I am guessing I will have to ask them for permission. I would rather know where they stand (most likely they will say to leave the gun in my car) than to have them find out once I am already in their house and then have them wonder how many times before I had gone to their house carrying this "deadly item". It's just not good PR and it may even cause them to distrust me or feel as if I deceived them and endangered their lives.

ChCx2744
October 6, 2010, 07:43 PM
It's none of anyone's business if I'm carrying a gun. I am legally allowed to CC, therefore nobody has any legal justification whatsoever even asking me if I have a gun, except maybe LEO in certain situations. It's concealed and it's staying that way. If anyone at anyplace has any objection to that, I can say with the best of my knowledge that I won't be visiting that location again. :)

brboyer
October 6, 2010, 08:05 PM
Once we, as gun owners, stop treating firearms differently than other personal property, the better off we will be.

Average Joe
October 6, 2010, 08:11 PM
If its concealed, they won't know unless you tell them. So don't tell them.

cassandrasdaddy
October 6, 2010, 08:23 PM
ssn vet condensed it to one sentence

Corporal K
October 6, 2010, 08:51 PM
It's none of anyone's business if I'm carrying a gun.

If it's their home, indeed it is their business.

Dulvarian
October 6, 2010, 09:54 PM
Fact is, you need to know the laws. Would you like to lose your permit because you didn't, and someone called the cops?

(The rest is just opinion. Feel free to skip the rest, may or may not be relevant.:D)

I always inform. And I have never had anyone say anything at all. I only visit friends or family. And all of them know that I carry anyway, so it isn't a big deal. Also, pretty much everyone I know is either in the military, a hunter, or a shooter. Happens when you are in the military for a while. My actual biggest concern is that someone (especially a child, an overly friendly dog, a touchy feely drunk) could get their hand on it while I was distracted.

For liability issues, even if I wasn't stationed in SC right now, I would expect that you tell me as a guest, that you are bringing a gun into my house. I would also expect that you also show all the other manners of a good guest. The homeowner is pretty much always liable in civil court over anything that happens on your property. If there is a possibility that there could be a problem while you are my guest, whatever it is, you should inform me. Mostly because I am awesome at solving problems, but also because it would really suck for me if your raging ex tracked you to my house and kicked in the door and I turned him or her into a pink smear on the wall.

I also would expect that if we had plans to watch the 'big game' or whatever, and you were sick and possibly going to pass it on, I would prefer that you sit this one out. Nor do I really want to see you come over all hung over and pass out on my couch. Or track dirt all over my house, etc. It's just manners. Even in someone else's car, whom I know smokes, I will still ask before lighting one up.

But on an amusing note, I would actually get patted down by my friends if I ever told them I wasn't carrying. No one would believe it. What's really funny is that people still think that, even though some of them know my permit has lapsed. :banghead: Going to fix that once I get a free Saturday.

And I don't know why people get all freaked about anyone knowing that they have a carry permit. It's just another tool. No one ever mentions anything about any of the other things I carry that can be used as weapons, or are weapons. Guns are the hardware, it's the software that is more important. Just like the only real safety is the one between your ears, the real weapon is in the same place.

And no, AFAIK, I don't have to tell anyone that there are a hundred or so things in their house that I can kill them with, were I so inclined.

ArmedBear
October 6, 2010, 09:56 PM
Uh, cassandrasdaddy, most people for whom guns aren't the central part of who they are just don't give much thought to carrying. If they habitually carry, then they do. It wouldn't occur to them to ask.

Like I said, this reflects a childish view of firearms. If carrying makes you all giddy, nervous, or sexually aroused, by all means, don't carry in someone's house.

If carrying concealed is as habitual as carrying a key ring and a wallet, you are unlikely to think about it much, and certainly not when passing through every doorway.

Broken Anvil
October 8, 2010, 09:44 AM
I don't have any friends that are too stupid as to not carry. They expect the same good sense out of me. I've got your back and you've got mine. I carry everywhere the law allows.......and everywhere else needed.

redbullitt
October 8, 2010, 03:27 PM
To the OP, no.

I do not really see any need for it. I just do not see how it could be helpful in any way shape or form.

mcdonl
October 8, 2010, 03:56 PM
I agree with SSN vet too, but I have carried in houses where I know the folks are anti-gun. I did not do this to be rude, or to prove a point I just happened to have the gun with me. I am pretty sure many of the establishments I go to are anti-gun too, but I still carry concealed.

I have had anti-gun family ask me if I am "packing" and I just laugh and say maybe.... they laugh back and leave me be.

If they forced the issue, I would say yes and I, or no I am not and if I were I would gladly leave to secure the gun in my car and probably would change my carry habits if I knew I were going there on any other given day. Otherwise, if I happen to carry... I carry everywhere I go.

ScratchnDent
October 8, 2010, 05:07 PM
I have a "Don't ask, don't tell" policy.

NoVA Shooter
October 8, 2010, 05:09 PM
The way I see it is that there are two situations
First, there is no indication (be it verbal, sign, etc) that guns are not allowed or need to be disclosed.
In this case, I would say that for the most part, there is no reason to tell the host. Having said that, I do believe that there are exceptions which need to be addressed on a case by case basis. For example, if the household has small children (anyone who has small children knows that a concealed weapon can go from concealed to open in a blink of an eye). Or say if I was going over for a pool party where there would be a need to disarm myself (the gun has left my possession and therefore I cannot guarantee its safe and proper use).

The second situation is where the homeowner has directly conveyed their wish that no guns be brought into their house (this is more than just knowing they are anti-gun) . In this case, absolutely and without question, I would not bring a gun in, concealed or not. This can be implemented in two ways; leave the gun in my car/home, or not go to that person’s house. Pretty simple. Alluding to SSN Vet’s very pertinent comment, “…guns are not the central, defining element of who I am”, the latter solution would rarely come into play. If on the off chance (yes, I live in a safe area and associate with safe people who also live in safe areas) I do not feel comfortable going to that person’s house without protection, I will make that clear to the person and let them compromise their convictions, not me.

I am always astonished at the mentality of “If its concealed, they won't know unless you tell them” as an excuse for not abiding by someone’s rules. This attitude is something I’d expect from a child who was told they can’t have any cookies before dinner, but ate them anyways when no one was looking because “nobody saw me do it, so the rule doesn’t apply.” Would anyone here accept this behavior from their child? No, and I definitely wouldn’t accept it from an “adult”. If someone tells you “Don’t bring a gun into my house” and you do it anyways, you are rude, immature, and a coward. Again, this isn’t about why someone doesn’t want a gun in their house or if their reasons make sense or not, it is about RESPECT. Respecting the wishes of another individual who has just as much right to hate guns and control his/her household as you do to carry a gun and not go to that person’s house.

herohog
October 8, 2010, 05:26 PM
Here in Louisiana, if you have a CHP, you MUST ask the homeowners permission. I did and had no objections even from some relatives I know to be Liberal and anti-gun. I don't know if it is because they trust me or were afraid to say no. Since then it hasn't come up and it remains a non-issue with us.

Ledgehammer
October 8, 2010, 05:49 PM
Well considering the fact that their homeowners insurance will get sued in the case of an accident. I fiind it extremely selfish and rude not to mention it. If I don't know you that well and don't know your safety conscious or training. Uh uh I don't want you carrying in my house. Otoh if I do know you well enough to know you're carrying without having to ask. You're ok in my book.

Ledgehammer
October 8, 2010, 05:52 PM
Well considering the fact that their homeowners insurance will get sued in the case of an accident. I fiind it extremely selfish and rude not to mention it. If I don't know you that well and don't know your safety conscious or training. Uh uh I don't want you carrying in my house. Otoh if I do know you well enough to know you're carrying without having to ask. You're ok in my book.

Ledgehammer
October 8, 2010, 05:53 PM
Well considering the fact that their homeowners insurance will get sued in the case of an accident. I fiind it extremely selfish and rude not to mention it. If I don't know you that well and don't know your safety conscious or training. Uh uh I don't want you carrying in my house. Otoh if I do know you well enough to know you're carrying without having to ask. You're ok in my book.

Ledgehammer
October 8, 2010, 05:54 PM
Well considering the fact that their homeowners insurance will get sued in the case of an accident. I fiind it extremely selfish and rude not to mention it. If I don't know you that well and don't know your safety conscious or training. Uh uh I don't want you carrying in my house. Otoh if I do know you well enough to know you're carrying without having to ask. You're ok in my book.

swinokur
October 8, 2010, 10:38 PM
if you respect other's property rights you'll let them know. If I see a no guns sign on a store's doors, I don't ignore it. Property owners have rights and yours don't trump theirs.

My .02 anyway

mustang_steve
October 8, 2010, 10:42 PM
My family and friends all know I carry and respect it. Actually my father is looking to get his permit soon, as are some of my friends, all of them know they can come to me at anytime for some good advice.

Iam2taz
October 9, 2010, 12:31 AM
These sound like my relatives. For years they were scared of guns... Then my niece comes home from Basic Training talking about shooting.... They knew I like hunting and guns, but had no idea how much. Next Christmas I walk into the house and there is a .40 cal casing setting on the microwave. I casually mention that it looked like someone found a shell. My SIL says, "No, thats mine." She comes back a few minutes later with a very nice XD. I almost passed out! She said, new people in the white house, more crime in the area and she isn't going to be without.
Times, they do change... Give it some time.... You know the rules of their house. Leave it in the car if you are worried about printing. Other than that, it is NO ONES business.

archigos
October 9, 2010, 12:41 AM
There's absolutely no obligation to disclose. I never bring it up, and I don't hesitate to carry anywhere it is legal. Self defense is a basic human right, and those that seek to deny me my right to life are clearly not my friends.

That being said, I've had friends on many occasions, knowing how vocal I am about our 2nd Amendment rights, ask me if I'm carrying when in their homes. As a rule, I don't lie, and I'm horrible at dodging questions (I can't help but smile) so I don't even try. I just answer the question honestly. As I said - if they seek to deny me my basic human rights, they clearly are not my friends. It makes a great boolean test regarding whether or not a person values your life.

SlamFire1
October 9, 2010, 05:41 PM
If someone tells you “Don’t bring a gun into my house” and you do it anyways, you are rude, immature, and a coward. Again, this isn’t about why someone doesn’t want a gun in their house or if their reasons make sense or not, it is about RESPECT. Respecting the wishes of another individual who has just as much right to hate guns and control his/her household as you do to carry a gun and not go to that person’s house.

Very well said.

Have we all forgotten "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."?

swinokur
October 9, 2010, 05:46 PM
my thoughts exactly. It's about respect for others. As others said, if you don't like it, exercise your rights by leaving or not entering. Their property rights trump your right to carry, but only on their property.

roo_ster
October 22, 2010, 12:20 PM
No
No
No

I assume there has been no talk on the topic beforehand.

If they have previously mentioned a rule against CC in their house, by all means comply. In my case, I would then not burden them with my presence.


of those who would carry in anothers home without or against their approval/knowledge, how many of you would get all butt hurt if they noticed and ordered you out? and didn't say please?

Not overly so. I think I'd be disappointed in them as defective humans and Americans.


Once we, as gun owners, stop treating firearms differently than other personal property, the better off we will be.

Agreed, 100%. Too many folks in & out of the gun culture either anthropomorphize firearms or think they are magical in some way.

They are property, tools, not demon-possessed talismans of doom.

---------

For my own part, I'd think it much more rude and more likely to have consequences if you enter a person's home when you have a contagious disease. Cold, flu, whatever. When I have been in such a state, I do inform the home owner.

My CCW has roughly 0.0000000001% (round off to zero) chance to spontaneously fire off a round and only a slightly greater chance (round off to zero) that I would fiddle with it and so cause a ND.

OTOH, it is very easy to transmit bacteria & viruses.

Bhamrichard
October 22, 2010, 07:44 PM
I have one friend who routinely hosts "get togethers" of a bunch of us old high school friends and I stop by fairly often for one on one conversation. We've had the discussion one time, he knows if I'm walking, i'm carrying, and he's cool with my presence and my carrying in his home. In the event that we're having one of these parties, where adult beverages are generally present, it is my personal choice to leave it at home. He personally owns one revolver that was left to him by his father upon his passing. He showed it to me during this one conversation and held it like it was a brick. He has no clue regarding firearms, but understands that I do.

I trust my friends, and my friends trust me, otherwise they wouldn't be called a friend in my book.

whalerman
October 22, 2010, 08:03 PM
I'm not sure I understand the thought process behind telling people that I am armed. It serves no purpose. I don't tell people I have my brain with me either.

Bernie Lomax
October 22, 2010, 08:21 PM
Is it rude of me to go into their house while concealed carrying?

No.

Should I let them know if I am?

Only if they ask.

If someone was concealed carrying while in your house would you want to know?

Only if you were a criminal who was there to victimize me, in which case you'd never tell anyway until it was time for you to commit whatever criminal act you came there to commit.

whalerman
October 22, 2010, 10:11 PM
Sledgehammer says one could get sued if there is an accident. How so? Would that be if the gun jumps out of concealment and starts to chase the kids around the house? I still don't understand this mindset. If that is the logic, that you owe complete status disclosures to every house you enter, then it follows that if you have a health or heart condition, you should not visit friends, as that might be your night.

I view being armed as being in a prepared state or condition. I wouldn't feel the need to tell a host that I have been trained in defensive tactics or studied judo if I'm headed over to eat pizza.

Maybe I just don't understand this one.

Delmar
October 22, 2010, 10:22 PM
I have a few friends who nearly wet their pants at the thought of a black bb gun, and because of that, my pistol stays in a locked box in my vehicle out of simple respect to their wishes. That said, when they come to visit, they may or may not know I am carrying-I do not put it on display.
Their house, their rules.
My house, my rules.

mhphoto
October 22, 2010, 10:27 PM
There are only two places where I don't carry: places forbidden by law and my parents house. They don't like guns so I leave mine in the car as a courtesy. Most other times I'm in someone else's house, I maintain a don't ask, don't tell policy. If they know I'm carrying without prior knowledge I'm doing it wrong.

whalerman
October 22, 2010, 11:14 PM
Leaving a weapon in a car is not smart. If you feel you need to clear things with people whose residences you visit, fine. But develop a smarter policy than leaving guns in cars. That is not a reasonable option.

Armed Bear said a smart thing. Those who carry concealed habitually rarely give it a thought. They do not clear everything when entering doorways. I carry for work, which may explain why I can't understand some of this thinking. I don't clear my armed status any more than I clear the color of my boxers. And Delmar, with all due respect, I don't have friends who nearly wet their pants at the thought of black bb guns. That kind of person is a nut case. I deal with them all day long. I'll be damned if I'm going to elect to spend time with them on my time off. Life is too short. Can you really let people like that make decisions about whether or not YOU should be ready to defend yourself? If they're that stupid, they probably are making a lot of other marginal decisions in their lives.
You said when they come to your house, it's your rules. Do you cover your furniture in case they get nervous and have an accident?

Nothing personal, Delmar. People like that just tick me off. Fear and opinion, based on no brains at all. Very common in today's America. And we wonder why we're in the political mess we're in.

toolmanroberts
October 22, 2010, 11:43 PM
The way I look at it this: by have a concealed carry permit, I have allready shown that I can handle a gun and I'am responsible with it. That should be al that is necessary. Don't ask, don't tell. If someone doesn't want me carrying in there home I will leave. There loss. Like roo ster said, it is only a tool and I'am in control of it and it won't come out unless it is needed. If it is needed they will be happy that I have it along. Hopefully I will never need to pull it out. But it is nice to be prepared.

ozarkgunner
October 23, 2010, 04:57 AM
I see no reason to inform anyone that you are carrying unless asked specifically. Recently I was over at the house of one of my daughter's friends, who is also a teacher at her school. The subject of guns came up as the husband didn't have any but wanted to get one for home defence. My wife quickly informed them that I had a variety and that I always carried. I produced my carry piece and showed it to rhem. They made no objections or weird eactions ro me carrying or carrying in their home.
I would only make it known if there were a specific reason.

stevelyn
October 23, 2010, 09:08 AM
If you enter my home and are armed I wonder what you are up to, I am not a scary person and do not believe one should need to be armed and feel threatened by me so you must be planning to harm me. I can secure my own home (or choose not to), and in my home I expect you to respect my policies.

I don't imagine that you are scary or threatening, but did you consider what kind of no-man's land your visitor may have had to traverse to come and visit your safe, fortified abode?

Joe Demko
October 23, 2010, 09:41 AM
Once we, as gun owners, stop treating firearms differently than other personal property, the better off we will be.

There's all kinds of personal property you may have that I don't want you bringing into my house. I don't want you bringing your heroin. I don't want you bringing your dildo. I don't want you bringing your cat. I don't want you bringing your clown costume. I don't want you bringing your collection of Star Trek TOS dvd's. The fact that they are your personal property means nothing. It also means nothing whether my reasons are rational or irrational. In your house, you can shoot up while dressed as Emmet Kelly and amuse yourself with pets and sex toys as Shatner emotes in the background all you want. If the rule in my house is that those things are not to be brought into the house, then your only choices are to leave them at your house or not come to my house. If you know that I don't want those things in my house but choose to smuggle one or more in, on the pretense that what is lodged in your body cavity is none of my business...well, you are a dishonest sort that I won't ever trust at all, should I find out about it.
You don't get to choose which of my household rules you are going to follow and which you are not. If you don't like my rules, stay away. I'll have more respect for you staying away than I will for you being a liar.

22-rimfire
October 23, 2010, 10:48 AM
+1 Joe Demko. You said that very well with quite colorful examples.

ironhead7544
October 23, 2010, 11:14 AM
If its legal I wouldnt mention it. If the state thinks you have the moral and practical sense to walk down the street carrying a firearm, then what difference does it make where you are? You will have to determine the risk of not carrying when you go somewhere.
This incident happened here. There is a mall that doesnt allow CCW. A woman was kidnapped from the parking lot. She was found in the woods, raped, nailed to a tree and beaten to death.
Another incident: A woman was on her way home from a university where she worked. Car broke down. She was later found in the woods, decapitated. The perp was caught and it was determined he had done this to at least 2 other women.
This is what I think of every time I hear that property rights trump personal defense rights. If you own and carry guns, expect other people to do the same.

whalerman
October 23, 2010, 12:32 PM
Joe, colorful examples. However, extremely irrelevant. If this person is a friend, you've no doubt become aware of his or her feelings. You just wouln't find yourself in their home in the first place. Same with the cocaine. You would have become aware of the situation, and wouldn't be in the home in first place. If the guy/lady doesn't take baths, you wouldn't be in their home in the first place. All this talk of the screening process and being respectul of everyone makes no sense. Don't you know your friends? Obviously you respect them or they wouldn't be your friends. You guys are making perfect sense to me if you were going door to door selling vacuum cleaners, but not visiting personal friends who you've supposedly known for awhile. Then again, I'd carry if I were selling door to door, and I wouldn't ask if they minded. But please guys, if your so concerned about polling the neighborhood about their views on you being armed, leave the gun at home. Leaving it in the car is unacceptable.

brboyer
October 23, 2010, 12:39 PM
There's all kinds of personal property you may have that I don't want you bringing into my house. I don't want you bringing your heroin. I don't want you bringing your dildo. I don't want you bringing your cat. I don't want you bringing your clown costume. I don't want you bringing your collection of Star Trek TOS dvd's. The fact that they are your personal property means nothing. It also means nothing whether my reasons are rational or irrational. In your house, you can shoot up while dressed as Emmet Kelly and amuse yourself with pets and sex toys as Shatner emotes in the background all you want. If the rule in my house is that those things are not to be brought into the house, then your only choices are to leave them at your house or not come to my house. If you know that I don't want those things in my house but choose to smuggle one or more in, on the pretense that what is lodged in your body cavity is none of my business...well, you are a dishonest sort that I won't ever trust at all, should I find out about it.
You don't get to choose which of my household rules you are going to follow and which you are not. If you don't like my rules, stay away. I'll have more respect for you staying away than I will for you being a liar.

:confused:

Joe Demko
October 23, 2010, 12:46 PM
Friends,family, it doesn't matter...and the issue is that if I know you like H/guns/clown costumes/etc. and I have told you that I don't like those things and don't want them in my house you cannot consider yourself a man of honor if you come to my house concealing any of them. You are, in point of fact, nothing but a liar if you do that. Whether I discover the clown nose in your pocket or not doesn't matter. You are in my house under a false pretense of abiding by my rules, ergo you are not somebody to be trusted in any context.
My house. My rules. My rules don't have to make sense to anybody but me.

If grandma doesn't like guns and doesn't want any in her house and told you as much, you cannot sneak a gun into grandma's house and consider yourself an honorable man.

Bernie Lomax
October 23, 2010, 01:37 PM
:confused:

Yeah, that was puzzling to me, too. Maybe he knows someone who has a KSP fetish.

22-rimfire
October 23, 2010, 02:35 PM
I generally have little problem with folks carrying anywhere. If someone does not want someone to carry in their home, that is their rule. If someone knows I routinely carry and ask that I not bring a firearm into their home, I have no problem with that. I don't care what the state or federal government has to say about it. Life is full of choices and I accept the consequences of my personal choices.

The fact of the matter, in my home, it depends WHO is carrying not IF they are carrying a handgun. Yes, I discriminate. Truthfully, I don't invite someone into my home unless they are family or I know them fairly well.

rodensouth
October 23, 2010, 03:59 PM
ArmedBear said it better than I could. Some are showing their lack of experience with concealed carry by their responses.

There is a big difference in one who carries daily and one who sometimes does.

I would never carry into a home that made it known to be unwelcome, but I never talk about the weapon I carry either.

sansone
October 23, 2010, 04:11 PM
if your gun is well concealed say nothing. Everyone in the room would be more comfortable without a discussion on the matter. If the homeowner is the type of person to get angry about it, I simply would not be there regardless

Joe Demko
October 23, 2010, 04:20 PM
Yeah, that was puzzling to me, too. Maybe he knows someone who has a KSP fetish.

Nope. I'm just making the point that, although you want to convince yourself it's okay to deceive your host(ess) because guns are special, they aren't and it isn't. It isn't your house, you don't get to decide which rules have to followed and which don't. If you can't live without your gun for a few hours on Thanksgiving, then just don't go to Grandma's house. It disgusts me that so many of you could happily sit at someone's table, eat their food, and be such a lying sack of **** while doing it.
People with such a fundamental lack of integrity would not be welcome in my house no matter how much lip-service they give to the concept of rights. In the end, the only right they really recognize is their "right" to do as they please and **** everybody else.

Zach S
October 23, 2010, 04:41 PM
1) No. Its no different going commando IMO. Unless the SHTF, weather or not I'm carrying concealed effects everyone as much as wearing drawers or not.

2) No. If they know about my concealed handgun, they know me pretty well. If they dont want it in their house, I dont go.

3) No. If they're inside my home, well, I trust them enough to be inside my home. Technicians, repairmen, etc, are few and far between, aren't trusted, and aren't left alone.

Voimakas
October 23, 2010, 04:53 PM
My close friends and family know I carry. My close friends and family know if I am there, I am armed. You don't want a gun in the house, don't invite me. For casual acquaintances and customers : no I don't tell them or ask their permission. Concealed for a reason.

Short story: before I married my wife, my grandma didn't want us sharing a bed at her house. So I didn't sleep there until after I married my wife. If my grandma said no guns, I wouldn't go. I don't tell her no religious crap in my home (and religion is much more dangerous.) So I expect her to respect my decisions about something important to me.

whalerman
October 23, 2010, 05:43 PM
Roden and Sansone, Thank You. You've settled some very strange lines of thought. It could very well be that many equate concealed carry with dressing in a tuxedo, ie and unusual event.

Demko, lighten up. No need to go into the "worthless pieces of .... " routine. I hope you listen up on the 'guns left in cars' practice. Another suggestion. When someone gets giddy about your gun don't pull it out and start showing people unless you're in a secured area and you've discussed this with the parents PREVIOUSLY. Producing a concealed weapon around kids shouldn't be done on a whim, no matter how proud you are or how excited the children are. Keep it holstered and concealed, whether the lady of the house is a teacher or not.

Maybe it's me. These lines of thought are contrary to all the training I've ever received.

Cap'n Jack Burntbeard
October 23, 2010, 07:59 PM
First of all it depends on whose house I am at.
I will not disarm myself to placate the vehemently anti self defense.
Nor will I change my religious beliefs, my taste in pornography, or my political beliefs because it may offend the ignorant.
If it is a contentious subject, I will simply not bring it up. My business is my business, not theirs.
The rights of an individual are only as good as that individual's respect for the rights of others.

tooltech
October 24, 2010, 02:31 AM
My close friends and family know I carry. My close friends and family know if I am there, I am armed. You don't want a gun in the house, don't invite me. For casual acquaintances and customers : no I don't tell them or ask their permission. Concealed for a reason.

This.

General Geoff
October 24, 2010, 10:09 AM
People with such a fundamental lack of integrity would not be welcome in my house no matter how much lip-service they give to the concept of rights. In the end, the only right they really recognize is their "right" to do as they please and **** everybody else.
If you lay out all your silly ground rules for entering your home from the get-go, I'm fairly sure that nobody would bother visiting you anymore, for fear of violating the fine print in your social contract. If that is your goal, more power to you. Your house, your rules, no argument there.

I gladly refrain from visiting anyone who makes it known beforehand that they do not allow firearms in their home or business.

roo_ster
October 24, 2010, 10:38 AM
Nope. I'm just making the point that, although you want to convince yourself it's okay to deceive your host(ess) because guns are special, they aren't and it isn't. It isn't your house, you don't get to decide which rules have to followed and which don't. If you can't live without your gun for a few hours on Thanksgiving, then just don't go to Grandma's house. It disgusts me that so many of you could happily sit at someone's table, eat their food, and be such a lying sack of **** while doing it.
People with such a fundamental lack of integrity would not be welcome in my house no matter how much lip-service they give to the concept of rights. In the end, the only right they really recognize is their "right" to do as they please and **** everybody else.

If you lay out all your silly ground rules for entering your home from the get-go, I'm fairly sure that nobody would bother visiting you anymore, for fear of violating the fine print in your social contract. If that is your goal, more power to you. Your house, your rules, no argument there.

JD, I think GG has your number.

I'd suspect that it is a rare event that anyone would ever get to that point, given the temperament displayed in your posts. Some folks are just too much a PITA to waste time on.

But, I do give you credit for truth in advertising:
"Location: Just two minutes from sanity."

22-rimfire
October 24, 2010, 11:08 AM
The only folks that come into my house that make me uncomfortable are the kids who I don't know other than perhaps their name. For the most part, the neighborhood kids stay outside however, my rule. My wife does not like it, but frankly, from a kid's perspective, my house is a gold mine of potential items to steal. My wife would say the place needs a bit of thinning. :) Kids talk too much and you don't know who they provide information to inadvertently or to try to make themselves feel important. They frequently do not understand the consequences of their actions.

Joe Demko
October 24, 2010, 11:57 AM
Spin it as hard as you want, there will be no way for you to rationalize slyly violating another person's house rules as anything but dishonesty. Do you carry the "if you don't get caught you didn't do anything wrong" idea over to other areas? Your marriage vows for example? Pilfering from work? Cheating at cards?
Integrity is what you do when others aren't looking, too.

General Geoff
October 24, 2010, 12:24 PM
Spin it as hard as you want, there will be no way for you to rationalize slyly violating another person's house rules as anything but dishonesty.

No spin intended. I do not intentionally violate any of another person's house rules of which I have been made aware.


I think the rub here is that I simply don't consider guns to be extraordinary objects requiring special house rules for simple possession, and thus don't assume that someone would bar others from carrying them in their home, unless they specify.


Of course, I typically open carry anyway, so if the homeowner does have a problem with me carrying, I'm sure they'll let me know, so that I can extricate myself from the premises in accordance with their wishes.

smartshot
October 24, 2010, 12:29 PM
you can always secure your gun in your car when going into a friend's house if that will make everyone more comfortable. If you feel that you need to have it with you 24/7, start by not telling people about it and they won't think to ask.

Joe Demko
October 24, 2010, 12:36 PM
My house rules are actually pretty basic and I make all of them known. Take your shoes off and don't smoke in the house is about it. I have no problem, personally, with people being armed. I am almost always. Maybe I'm old fashioned, but my personal honor means more to me than a pistol does. I'd rather do without the pistol for a couple hours than dishonor myself and disrespect my host(ess). YMMV.

General Geoff
October 24, 2010, 12:39 PM
Maybe I'm old fashioned, but my personal honor means more to me than a pistol does.

Given a scenario in which you need to use that pistol, you may reconsider (Unless you're the type who prefers death before dishonor; in which case I salute you).

That said, the two need not be mutually exclusive.

Joe Demko
October 24, 2010, 12:54 PM
See, the odds of me needing that pistol inside the home of the people I know who don't want guns in their houses are quite small. Vanishingly so. If I sneak a gun into their home, though, I've dishonored myself right there whether I get caught or not. I will know that I behaved dishonestly with people who trusted me to follow their wishes about their home.
What about the trip, you say? That's why I secure the gun in the car before going in my host's house. Perhaps I just don't run with a crowd as exciting as some of you do. I've never been attacked while visiting people in rural and suburban PA. My friends and family aren't low-life, so they aren't in conflict with other low-life nor do they have low-life friends hanging around. I don't live in an urban combat zone, so I won't try to rationalize lying to my host by telling myself that my life hangs in the balance. It doesn't.

General Geoff
October 24, 2010, 01:13 PM
See, the odds of me needing that pistol inside the home of the people I know who don't want guns in their houses are quite small.

The odds of any of us needing a pistol on any given day is also quite small. The odds of getting into a car accident on a given day is quite small. You still buckle up, don't you?

Let's say you get into a friend's car and he's removed the passenger side seat belt. Would you still ride in that car? How about if the seat belt is there, but he says you're not allowed to use it?

shockwave
October 24, 2010, 01:14 PM
given a scenario in which you need to use that pistol

In some situation where you're visiting friends at their home, and for whatever reason they've explained that they'd prefer guests be unarmed, the risk of a violent home invasion occurring are virtually zero. The risk of massively irritating your hosts is extreme if you decide to ignore their expressed wishes in this regard.

My inclination is to defer to the rights of the homeowner. If he or she wishes to enjoy their property as a firearm-free zone (and oh please just shaddap about how "the violent home invaders who choose this moment to strike do not care about..." blah blah blah. It's stupid the first time you said it, it only gets more vapid and stupid with repetition), then my denying them that preference by carrying on their property against their wishes is a really nasty, punk thing to do.

Like the guy above says, if you have an ounce of honor in your blood, you don't disrespect your friends like that. How long is the dinner party or barbecue or sushi fest going to be, anyway? Are we talking, what, an hour? Maybe 2?

OK. So for an hour of the day your gun was locked in the car. Yes, it was a major, life-threatening risk for you. At that exact hour the ninja assassination squad had you vulnerable and helpless. Life is tough, and does present moments of extreme danger. That's what makes it interesting.

youngda9
October 24, 2010, 01:15 PM
Joe Demko, you wrote "My house rules are actually pretty basic and I make all of them known."

How do you make them known? Is there a sign outside the door? Do you go into a 5 minute speech laying out all of your "rules" the first time a new person enters your house? Is their a contract the person has to sign?

Do tell :)

Joe Demko
October 24, 2010, 01:19 PM
When they come in, I say "please take off your shoes." If they smoke, I say "let's go out on the porch and may I have one of your smokes?" Simple, huh?

TheProf
October 24, 2010, 02:41 PM
1. I am a big believer in CC whenever legal.... (that includes your home).

2. No... I don't want you to CC in my home....this is specially true if I don't know you well.

3. Does this sound like a double standard? Yes.

4. Why the double standard? If you are a friend... I have spare weapons to arm you if needed. But I would rather that you don't CC in my home. That removes AD on your part 100%.

If I don't know you well... I want to have the tactical advantage.

Neverwinter
October 24, 2010, 03:22 PM
The odds of any of us needing a pistol on any given day is also quite small. The odds of getting into a car accident on a given day is quite small. You still buckle up, don't you?

Let's say you get into a friend's car and he's removed the passenger side seat belt. Would you still ride in that car? How about if the seat belt is there, but he says you're not allowed to use it?
This is not an accurate analogy. If the driver gets into an accident, having an unrestrained body bouncing around in the cabin can increase the damage to the car and the driver. If a blue moon comes around and a person is missing their firearm when it is needed, no increased harm to the owner or his property occurs.

NavyLCDR
October 24, 2010, 04:37 PM
This is not an accurate analogy. If the driver gets into an accident, having an unrestrained body bouncing around in the cabin can increase the damage to the car and the driver. If a blue moon comes around and a person is missing their firearm when it is needed, no increased harm to the owner or his property occurs.

Seriously? You do realize you are posting on a pro-gun forum, right? The bold part above sounds like it came from the Brady Campaign.

Joe Demko
October 24, 2010, 04:42 PM
No, his comment makes perfect sense and is accurate. If a person wishes to have a gun-free home and that home is invaded, he's likely screwed. You being there without your gun doesn't make him any more scrod.

General Geoff
October 24, 2010, 05:23 PM
If a blue moon comes around and a person is missing their firearm when it is needed, no increased harm to the owner or his property occurs.

Why does anybody carry a firearm then?


You being there without your gun doesn't make him any more scrod.

Completely missing the point.

NavyLCDR
October 24, 2010, 06:24 PM
You being there without your gun doesn't make him any more scrod.

It does, however, cause the person there without their gun to become more screwed. :banghead:

ironhead7544
October 24, 2010, 07:03 PM
Some people are afraid of spiders. Some are afraid of snakes. Some are afraid of heights. And some are afraid of guns. That is what it comes down to.

Ifishsum
October 24, 2010, 09:19 PM
I am not going to announce my carrying status to anyone, it's not their business IMO. Now, if I know my host would object then I'll either leave it or not go there - and if I were asked to leave or stow the handgun I would honor their request. I wouldn't lie about it, but unless they see it or ask me directly, they're not going to know.

A few years ago a gun club member stopped by the house to drop off something for me when I wasn't home (wife knew he was coming beforehand). Before he entered he announced to my wife that he was carrying, and she thought it very strange that he would announce it.

smartshot
October 24, 2010, 09:42 PM
gentlemen, sometimes it is ok to not have your firearm with you, we all know anything is possible, but there are situations when it is not practical. Does anyone carry in the shower? In the swimming pool? If not, then why? What if, what if, what if???

archigos
October 25, 2010, 01:23 AM
gentlemen, sometimes it is ok to not have your firearm with you, we all know anything is possible, but there are situations when it is not practical. Does anyone carry in the shower? In the swimming pool? If not, then why? What if, what if, what if???
You're absolutely right. There are many times I do not carry.
However, the whole situation can be summarized in one simple statement: I am not comfortable around anybody who is not comfortable with me having the means to defend myself.

thorazine
October 25, 2010, 06:28 AM
My house, My rules. I feel it'd be good manners to ask. Lets say I was terrified of..., lets say plush bunnies, and you brought a plush bunny over without asking me I would be rather upset. Just clear whatever you're bringin over with them.

What about a concealed plush bunny?

You would never know it was there in the first place therefore how would it bother you?

I think its a matter of respect or the lack thereof that causes someone to disrespect another's home whether they're gun friendly or not. If you don't have express permission to carry in their home, you shouldn't do it no matter what. IF that makes you drop friends or family I guess that that's your personal decision. But I see it as very disrespectful to not ask permission.

Do you leave your cellphone in the car? For wouldn't it be disrespectful to take a call or be interrupted while in delightful conversation?

Do you remove your shoes or inquire about your shoes?

etc.

Hot brass
October 25, 2010, 06:45 AM
If the person has a CCW, it is not a problem for me.

Gouranga
October 25, 2010, 09:06 AM
IMO, this comes down to common courtesy and respect for your host. There are plenty of folks on here who would allow the host to cut off their right arm before leaving the gun in the car. For those, I would submit, there is also no way in hades you would befriend someone who is anti-CCW much less enter their home.

We do not need to set of rules posted for the OP. He KNOWS they do not want them there. I am sorry but it is their roof, their rules. Do we really need to be acting like weasels (forgive me the name here but this is what it feels like), insisting on specific posting, specific signs, or for the homeowner to go through a legal punch list before entering their home? Remember these folks ARE your friends. Can we not just respect their wishes OR simply refrain from entering their homes?

Don't get me wrong, I CCW in my home, almost everywhere I legally can. I would welcome my friends who CCW into my home without an issue. My children have been taught about gun safety and what not to do and know the severe repercussions that await any of them who act unsafely. An anti will not have taught their children in such a manner.

I have friends who are not anti but ARE nervous around guns because of a lack of experience. I am working on them with that and I am betting within a year they will be carrying as well. Until then, I refrain from carrying in their homes. Yes during the time I am unarmed I have a heightened risk, IMO though, the friendship is worth that risk and showing respect and consideration of my host is as well.

It is a personal choice for me and a matter of ethics. Not saying those who do not share my opinion are unethical but you simply do not play by the same rules as me.

youngda9
October 25, 2010, 09:23 AM
My close friends and family know I carry. My close friends and family know if I am there, I am armed. You don't want a gun in the house, don't invite me. For casual acquaintances and customers : no I don't tell them or ask their permission. Concealed for a reason.

This +2

youngda9
October 25, 2010, 09:25 AM
When they come in, I say "please take off your shoes." If they smoke, I say "let's go out on the porch and may I have one of your smokes?" Simple, huh?
NO, it's not that simple. If they are concealed properly, you won't know they are packing. They won't know this is one of "your rules"...so then what? Do you throw them out claiming that they are breaking your, unknown to them, house rules? It must be such a scene.

mcdonl
October 25, 2010, 10:20 AM
I do not see where Joe said one of HIS rules are no guns in his house. He is saying he honors other peoples requests to not carry in THEIR homes... Maybe it is buried in one of the previous pages I do not care to read. If so, I apologize....

Neverwinter
October 25, 2010, 11:28 AM
This is not an accurate analogy. If the driver gets into an accident, having an unrestrained body bouncing around in the cabin can increase the damage to the car and the driver. If a blue moon comes around and a person is missing their firearm when it is needed, no increased harm to the owner or his property occurs.Seriously? You do realize you are posting on a pro-gun forum, right? The bold part above sounds like it came from the Brady Campaign.
Thank you for the compliment. :D

You do realize that my post was satire, right? What kind of selfish individual would be primarily motivated to encourage use of seatbelts in a car based on the personal damage rather than the safety of the passenger?

Do you leave your cellphone in the car? For wouldn't it be disrespectful to take a call or be interrupted while in delightful conversation?

Do you remove your shoes or inquire about your shoes?

etc.
1. You can turn it to silent.
2. The tradition regarding shoes can be determined by looking at your host's feet or the presence of shoes at the front entrance.

There is no easy way to determine what the convention for the house is without asking unless the host happens to be OC.

cambeul41
October 25, 2010, 01:57 PM
I am with Joe Demko on the subjects of shoes, smokes, and personal honor, but -- no thank you -- I do not smoke.

DasFriek
October 25, 2010, 03:09 PM
If my gun isn't welcome in their house than neither am I.
But i don't make a point of letting anyone know i do carry, Even family. But most of my family are hunters and also have their CHL also.

Twisted nursery rhyme:

DasFriek had a Blacked out 1911,
Blacked out 1911, Blacked out 1911,
DasFriek had a Blacked out 1911,
whose rounds where big as heck.
And everywhere that DasFriek went,
DasFriek went, DasFriek went,
and everywhere that DasFriek went,
the Blacked out 1911 was sure to go.

It followed him to his relatives house one day
relatives house one day,relatives house one day,
It followed him to his relatives house one day,
which may have been against the rules.
But It made the adults ask to hold and dry fire it,
hold and dry fire it, hold and dry fire it,
it made the adults ask to hold and dry fire it,
to see a 1911 so sweet.

And so the anti got upset,
anti got upset, anti got upset,
And so the anti got upset,
Cause the blacked out 1911 proved it wouldn't kill on its own,
And proved it wouldn't kill on its own,
proved it wouldn't kill on its own, proved it wouldn't kill on its own,
And proved it wouldn't kill on its own.
till DasFriek did needed to protect his and loved ones lives.

"Why does the 1911 protect DasFriek so?"
Protect DasFriek so? Protect DasFriek so?
"Why does the 1911 Protect DasFriek so,"
the eager gun lovers asked.
"Why, DasFriek loves the 1911, you know."
The 1911, you know, the 1911, you know,
"Why, DasFriek loves the 1911, you know,"
So the anti went away.

Joe Demko
October 25, 2010, 04:56 PM
NO, it's not that simple. If they are concealed properly, you won't know they are packing. They won't know this is one of "your rules"...so then what? Do you throw them out claiming that they are breaking your, unknown to them, house rules? It must be such a scene.

My rules are in the first post at the top of page 6. Did you read it? Nobody has made a scene so far. Guests take their shoes off and the ones who smoke join me on the porch. I know that doesn't dovetail with how you would prefer things to be for the sake of you being able to put your personal preferences above those of your host, but there you go. As mcdonl was kind enough to explain to you, I don't prohibit carry in my house; I honor the wishes of those who do in their houses. It's that whole personal honor and not wanting to be a weasel (good word!) thing, you see.

whalerman
October 25, 2010, 08:56 PM
I think we're back to the beginning on this one. If a person carries as a regular part of their day, it is very difficult to understand this line of conversation. I do not take polls of how people feel when entering a residence. I do not disclose to anyone my carry status, unless that is part of a mutual conversation that all are involved with. If a friend makes his views known that he doesn't want weapons near his person, I make sure I do not carry in his home. Sometimes, I'm disinclined to return to that home, but that's another topic altogether. But I don't tell him/her anything about my carry status. Maybe this is based on the fact that I carry concealed for my work as LEO. This entire line of discussion is foreign to me.

I can offer this example for consideration. It is not a perfect analogy, but it could help a bit for some. A couple decades ago, some nations made it their policy not to allow nuclear armed US Navy vessels into their harbors. To my knowledge, our government accepted these "notices" as legitimate decisions made by the host nations. However, we never adopted a policy of either announcing beforehand which ships were so armed nor would we answer questions about the status of individual ships. I'm not sure if that policy has changed but that is the way it stood for many years.

CZguy
October 25, 2010, 11:58 PM
I can offer this example for consideration. It is not a perfect analogy, but it could help a bit for some. A couple decades ago, some nations made it their policy not to allow nuclear armed US Navy vessels into their harbors. To my knowledge, our government accepted these "notices" as legitimate decisions made by the host nations. However, we never adopted a policy of either announcing beforehand which ships were so armed nor would we answer questions about the status of individual ships. I'm not sure if that policy has changed but that is the way it stood for many years.

Now that is a good analogy.

Ryanxia
October 26, 2010, 11:35 AM
I CC everywhere.
I don't let anyone know (I would reconsider if I were an overnight guest and knew they didn't care for firearms)
I would want to know if someone were CCing at my house if they were drinking. Otherwise I'd want to know just so we could talk shop :D

leadcounsel
November 4, 2010, 02:13 PM
Once we, as gun owners, stop treating firearms differently than other personal property, the better off we will be.


Yep.

Sniper X
November 4, 2010, 02:29 PM
I use to drive by this house down in the student ghetto every once in a while. It is the VERY liberal part of town for many reasons, University area, and Santa Fe and California Transplants abound. During a campaign time ALL signs proudly displayed are for the democrats. Anyway, saw a house with a proudly displayed sign for the latest demo and a BIG sign next to it, sign said "This house is a GUN FREE ZONE!" I joked with the person I was going to lunch that it might as well say STEAL EVERYTHING I OWN. We had a little chuckle as we both carry.

About a week ago I heard they were victems of a home invasion where the perps took every bit of belongings that had any worth including their heirlooms and even china. I heard there was about 140K worth of stuff stolen.


I guess the sign worked in a different manner than intended. And although I am not happy they got ripped off, I can say the sign no longer is in the front yard!

Broken Anvil
November 4, 2010, 02:49 PM
Like my daddy said to me many years ago," Regardless of the law....I don't carry no more and I don't carry no less". He passed away this year at 81 years old.....I miss him.

Voimakas
November 4, 2010, 03:05 PM
Sniper X,

On the other hand, I wouldn't want a sign saying that I owned weapons or that my house was protected by Smith and Wesson or something similar. That's just begging for people to be like "Hey, let's wait for them to not be home, break in, and we have firearms!" You know they sell quite well on the street.

CZguy
November 4, 2010, 04:02 PM
Like my daddy said to me many years ago," Regardless of the law....I don't carry no more and I don't carry no less". He passed away this year at 81 years old.....I miss him.

Sounds like a wise man.

Sorry for your loss.

Lou McGopher
November 4, 2010, 04:23 PM
If they don't ask me before I enter whether or not I have a gun, I'm going to assume it's not a big enough issue for them either way. If they say they don't want it in their home, then I won't bring it in. But I'm not going to treat the firearm differently than any other issue. I handle it this way because, to my knowledge, my friends and most of the people in my area do not have a custom of demanding guests refrain from bringing firearms for personal protection into the home.

So if there is no explicit statement beforehand as to what the host wants, I would go with whatever is customary in your area, or among the culture of your host (if known). If you are in doubt, and feel that they could have a problem with the presence of the firearm should they become aware of it, then ask, and if you don't like the answer, feel free to leave.

Sniper X
November 4, 2010, 04:32 PM
voim, that is how I feel too. I prefer to stay mute on the topic if in the city, which is why i CCW as well. Now up on my land, and around my land EVERYONE open carries. And NO ONE comes up here to break into houses!

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