Columbia River Knife,good choice or not?


PDA






lookshigh123
October 8, 2010, 12:04 AM
Hi, there. What ya think this Columbia River Knife? (http://www.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.com/searchdeals.php?type=id&q=d187788&ru=28901875)Is it nice stuff for self-protection? Any other suggestions?

If you enjoyed reading about "Columbia River Knife,good choice or not?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
jbkebert
October 8, 2010, 12:13 AM
I have a couple knives from CRKT and they are pretty darn good knives. The M-16 series works great and also the cord wrapped knives. The single bevel edge is a little hard to sharpen but seems to retain a edge well. Don't know a thing about the model listed in your link but as a whole not bad blades.

hso
October 8, 2010, 12:15 AM
Don't like "tantos". Commonly available on the 'net for $21-$25 so the $25 is fine.

jbkebert
October 8, 2010, 12:22 AM
http://www.crkt.com/M1603Z

I carried this one everyday for several years. Great knife

lookshigh123
October 8, 2010, 12:41 AM
CRKT ? I'll check it soon.

lookshigh123
October 8, 2010, 12:42 AM
Anyway, thanks for all your inputs.

jbkebert
October 8, 2010, 12:42 AM
CRKT is columbia river knife and tool. Same company that makes the knife you originally asked about.

Big Bill
October 9, 2010, 03:27 AM
lookshigh123 - beware of adds that don't disclose the type of steel and other facts about the knife you are interested in purchasing (especially the steel). Generally speaking you get what you pay for. cheap price = cheap knife

Some knifemakers are having some of their knives manufactured in China. Although this, in itself, isn't always bad, in lots of cases it is. I know even Spyderco and Kershaw as well as Buck have resorted to this practice in order to compete. So, when you're looking remember this slogan: "let the buyer beware!"

The M16 CRKT mentioned earlier is only AUS 4 steel. I personally won't buy AUS 4, preferring AUS 8 instead. Cold Steel uses AUS 8A in lots of their blades; which, I suppose is some variation of AUS 8. I've had a couple of CS knives in AUS 8A and have been satisfied with them, So, sometimes you just have to try one and see. Also, I look for g10 scales instead of Zytel.

Check out the difference in the quality of these two knives"

Spyderco ManixII

http://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=418

CRKT M16 Zytel

http://www.crkt.com/M1603Z

jbkebert
October 9, 2010, 09:59 AM
While I do agree with Big Bill on choice of steel. My current EDC is a D2 blade which is exceptionaly hard steel with excellant edge holding abilities. It's also a $200 plus dollar custom. While you can get these blades cheaper they still are not in the range you are looking at. I have owned several knives made with AUS-8 steels mostly Gerber brand. I have found the steel to be awkward to sharpen well. The benifit to the CRKT is the single bevel edge does not breakdown much like the edge of a chisel. The same blade steel in a double bevel will not last nearly as long. I am very abusive to my knives and use them multiple times a day.

leadcounsel
October 9, 2010, 10:06 AM
I have a few and they are fine for EDC, which is how I use them. Not heartbroken if I lose them...

shockwave
October 9, 2010, 10:19 AM
CRTK makes some great high-quality knives. They aren't all the same, so it's good to research the designers, the steel, etc., before making a choice. Their Graham Razels (http://www.crkt.com/graham-stubby-folding-razel-ram-horn-handle-razor-sharp-edge), for example, are extremely well made.

TimboKhan
October 9, 2010, 01:49 PM
The Razels are fantastic, and the M-16 series seems to be above average.

My experience with CRKT has been uniformly good, but I will say that in terms of my daily carry knife I typically look to Spyderco or Benchmade. That might change though, because the new Ken Onion knives from CRKT are pretty righteous.

Deltaboy
October 9, 2010, 06:06 PM
Good Knives so far.

JTW Jr.
October 10, 2010, 12:17 AM
I have a few of the different CKRT model 16 variants , they hold up well for the price point.

Big Bill
October 10, 2010, 03:41 AM
I have a CRKT Voodoo. It's no longer made, but here's the description..Description:

"Designed by renowned custom knifemakers Pat & Wes Crawford of West Memphis, Arkansas, the Voodoo is an open build aluminum framed locking liner folder with assisted opening. It features a unique symmetrical design, drilled to reduce weight. CRKT were able to employ the Tailwind™ speed assist technology (patent pending) which is ingeniously simple, strong and lightweight. Its over-center cam/spring design holds the folder securely closed. When either of the dual custom thumb studs is rotated outward 30 degrees, the Tailwind spring instantly rotates the blade to full open and locked position. Teflon® bushings at the blade pivot help make the action smooth and very, very fast. The Voodoo’s blade is premium 154 CM stainless steel, with a Rockwell hardness of 58-60. The blade is a modified spear point, hollow ground with a false top edge to aid penetration, while the blade spine keeps its full thickness for two thirds of its length for strength. Both Razor-Sharp and Combined Razor-Sharp & Triple-Point™ Serrated cutting edged models are available. Blade finish is a non-reflective light bead blast. Four lightening holes in the blade also add a decorative touch. The handle uses our exceptionally rigid and strong InterFrame construction, with two 410 stainless steel liners, one locking, and scales of 6061 aluminum, hard anodized Gray. To aid grip, the handle features inlaid and textured strip inserts of black Santoprene on both sides of the knife. Premium Torx® fasteners are used throughout. The Voodoo comes with a removable pocket/gear clip of 410 stainless steel in light bead blast finish. The symmetrical clip can be reversed thanks to tapped holes on both sides of the knife. "Here's a picture of mine:

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=112331&d=1262566995

CRKT, DOES make some very high quality knives. It just depends on what one is willing to pay.

JShirley
October 11, 2010, 07:20 AM
Spyderco Persistence (http://newgraham.com/store/product/6625/Persistance-PE/). A few bucks more for a high quality, useful, very sturdy knife.

Black Toe Knives
October 14, 2010, 04:45 AM
I have two CRKT, both for the novelty. One is dogfish the other is the Fulcrum. I never have carried either as a serious EDC.

Erik M
October 16, 2010, 09:04 PM
That is a really good deal on a Spyderco knife JShirley.

My edc is a CRKT Hammond Cruiser I picked up from SMKW for $20. They were going for around $40 on Amazon about a year ago. I really like that its easily carried and has a 4" spear point non serrated blade.

publiuss
October 16, 2010, 09:31 PM
I have one and it is a good knife. Not a Spyderco or Benchmade, but a good knife.

offroaddiver
October 16, 2010, 10:36 PM
I like CRKT knives. They're cheap enough that if they break or if they fall out of pocket, it's not gonna kill my wallet. Problem is I've not had one chip out, break or get lost. I wish I could say I've never lost a Benchmade, Spyderco, or cold steel.
I have a CRKT EDGIE 2 in my toolbox for cutting rope. I have a carson 21 with the veff serations as my EDC and I love it.

jbkebert
October 16, 2010, 10:48 PM
http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww241/jbkebert/crkt001.jpg?t=1287279888
Probably my favorite CRKT knife that I own. I wear it small of back while fishing, hiking, mountain biking. It hangs down enough to not get in the way of my day pack or is not uncomfortable while rowing my little jon boat around the lake. Sharp little bugger perfect for cutting fishing line and common small tasks around camp. It is easy to get to while riding my bike and doesn't dig into my side like a verticle carry fixed blade knife would. Had it around 8 or 9 years now.

TEAM101
October 16, 2010, 11:17 PM
Spyderco Persistence. A few bucks more for a high quality, useful, very sturdy knife.

So I thought, then I saw the infamous MADEINCHINA birthmark and passed. Is it worth buying or spending a few bucks more for a Native or other model.

conw
October 16, 2010, 11:55 PM
So I thought, then I saw the infamous MADEINCHINA birthmark and passed. Is it worth buying or spending a few bucks more for a Native or other model.

This has been covered ad nauseam and in my opinion helps prove "no publicity is bad publicity." Spyderco has just shown their classy business practices again by getting a good Chinese product...their secret? Good quality control.

OTOH I have seen CRKTs that were Made in USA that I would probably decline for free. Some of them do seem nice but their QC is less consistent and made in USA is never a guarantee.

TimboKhan
October 17, 2010, 02:40 AM
I should add that my go-to fishing and pheasant knife for the last few years has been this little CRKT Kit Carson designed bird-and-trout knife. CRKT hasn't made them for awhile as far as I know, but it has been a very good little knife. Good enough, in fact, that I have no desire to purchase any other knife to fill that role. Aside from being a good knife, the sheath is one of the best I have ever had come with a knife. My buddy and I both purchased ours at a gun show in probably 2003 or 2004 or so for right around 15 bucks. Why CRKT no longer makes this knife, I dunno. I have used mine to break down a number of pheasants, and I have prepared a couple of fish for shore lunch with it.

Hey! Google is my friend! It turns out that my knife is called the F4! Here is a link to a review of it: CRKT F4 (http://www.gundigest.com/article/handson-crkt-carson-f4/)

thebaldguy
October 17, 2010, 10:37 PM
I have the same knife and I like it. It's light and quick to open. I do like the automatic blade lock. If you look around, you should be able to find one for around $20. There are better and more expensive knives out there, but this one works for me and if I lose it I'm not out a large wad of cash.

Big Bill
October 17, 2010, 11:51 PM
This has been covered ad nauseam and in my opinion helps prove "no publicity is bad publicity." Spyderco has just shown their classy business practices again by getting a good Chinese product...their secret? Good quality control.I take exception with your statement conwict. Spyderco knives, just like their knife making counterparts like: Kershaw, Buck, SOG etc. have lowered their standards by building substandard knives in China. They utilize sub par labor (some consider slave labor) and poor quality materials to produce these low cost products that they then sell to the ignorant masses who wouldn't know good blade steel and quality workmanship if it kicked them in the backside.

They prostitute their previous good name to peddle there cheap Chinese products. It's a disgrace; and, IMHO will soon cause their demise.

To everyone here: Buy some good American or European made knives while you still can. Someday, in our lifetime, they won't exist.

lookshigh123
October 18, 2010, 12:43 AM
they won't exist? Why do u say that?

Big Bill
October 18, 2010, 01:22 AM
Because, they'll all have to move their production to China and make cheap knives just to compete. Those who can or won't comply will be driven from the market.

TimboKhan
October 18, 2010, 02:33 AM
You are incorrect, Bill. Buck stopped the bulk of it's Chinese production some time ago, and it is my understanding they are phasing it out completely as material stocks run out. It is very unlikely that Spyderco will need to move the bulk of it's production to China to compete, as there is only a 30 dollar difference between the Persistence and an Endura (which is made in Seki City, Japan) and about the same difference between the Persistence and the Native, which is made in Colorado. They make Chinese knives because there is a market for inexpensive knives, not because they have to do so to compete.

Fact of the matter is, the bulk of the market is going to laugh uncontrollably at the thought of buying a $100.00 pocket knife, let alone something like a Sebenza, and they couldn't care less about what steel is used. My work buddy thought that "S30V" was a serial number. More to the point, he is as happy with his little 30 dollar CRKT M16 as I am with any one of my more expensive theoretically better knives, as are the bulk of users that buy Smith and Wesson knives, gas station knives or flea market knives. Anyway, my point is that there is room in the market for all of these things. They don't have to be and aren't mutually exclusive. Though I would go so far as to say it is a general truth Chinese knives are suspect, as you yourself admit not all Chinese knives are crap. I maintain that the reverse is true and there are some less than quality knives made here in the US.

jkulysses
October 18, 2010, 03:05 AM
I was ready to buy one until I read a few comments on their own website review section and people said their knives where stamped made in Taiwan. Turned me off and their only a few hours from me.

Moose23
October 20, 2010, 03:31 PM
Got one just like it that I carry at work. I'm a paramedic, so it's used to cut seatbelts, clothes, shoelaces, etc... Not a huge fan of serrated edges, but they work well for ripping/cutting heavy stuff like the above.

Only problem I've had with it is the screws holding the clip in place wallowed out & then backed out. Went online to CRKT and ordered more screws, used loctite on them & haven't had any problems since. And CRKT didn't charge me a dime, not even shipping.

I'll buy again from CRKT just because of the great customer service.

Big Bill
October 21, 2010, 01:59 AM
Timbo - a well made knife with great steel and other superior materials will always cost more $; and, there will always be educated and discriminating consumers willing to pay more money for that quality. However, companies are cutting corners simply because there are many people just like your buddy that doesn't know the difference between a good knife and a turd. It's too bad.They make Chinese knives because there is a market for inexpensive knives...I thought that's what I was saying. And, that market is driven by people like your buddy, who could care less. So, good companies are forced to make knives like Taylor Brands just to remain solvent.

jahwarrior
October 21, 2010, 04:59 AM
i currently own two CRKT knives, the Plan B and the Hissatsu. i bought the Hissatsu to satisfy my mall ninja cravings, but the Plan B turned out to a great little knife. i've never owned any of their folders, but i've never heard anyone say a bad word about them, and they seem to be pretty popular.

the only negative thing i have to say about CRKT fixed blades are the crappy sheaths they come with.

JR47
October 21, 2010, 11:09 PM
a well made knife with great steel and other superior materials will always cost more $; and, there will always be educated and discriminating consumers willing to pay more money for that quality. However, companies are cutting corners simply because there are many people just like your buddy that doesn't know the difference between a good knife and a turd. It's too bad.

Here we go, the knife equivalent of the 1911 discussion. Read the May, 2009 issue of Knives Illustrated. On page 30 is an article by Michael Black. In it, he tests multiple pieces of the same Model of knives. The result? many of the "high end" knives don't cut as well as the "cheaper" knives. It appears that QC is lacking at the steel mills, and a less "spec" knife of that steel will perform poorly.

Face it, many "good steels" aren't really particularly different in overall performance for anything but emptying one's wallet. What you do with a knife should determine the quality of the blade, as well as the shape and grind. Most people don't use a knife enough to be able to say what is the best "steel".

I was in Fire/EMS for 35 years, and a good knife was almost a requirement. I started with a Buck 110, and that knife, with it 420HC steel was just about the best that many of us could find. I traded it's position with an original Spyderco Standard, with SpyderEdge. This was the early version, with the clip cut from the scale on the right side. That knife performed well beyond it's size for years.

For the average person in today's PC world, a knife is something to open letters, boxes, and cut cord and string with. It needs to be small, light, and easy to open and use. With that usage, carrying anything with "special steel" is an exercise in preference, not need.

TimboKhan
October 22, 2010, 12:51 AM
For the average person in today's PC world, a knife is something to open letters, boxes, and cut cord and string with. It needs to be small, light, and easy to open and use. With that usage, carrying anything with "special steel" is an exercise in preference, not need.

I agree with this, and I guess that's the point I was trying to make. My buddy isn't in the dark because he doesn't know what steel his M16 is, he is happy because it works. What he does know, and that I failed to mention, is that this is the best quality knife he has ever owned (outside of his only other non-kitchen knife, a Case Trapper, which was a gift to him). He has owned crappy flea market knives, and he can see and appreciate the clear difference in quality between his knife and those knives. He can also see, but not necessarily appreciate, the difference in quality between my Endura (most often carried) and my Griptilian and his M16 and does occasionally ask questions about them and why they are "better" than his knife.

Since he works with knife knut me, he may eventually become more educated and interested in "better knives", because none of us start off knowing that a Sebenza is awesome. Heck, I only got seriously interested in this hobby maybe two years ago. I have done a lot of reading and studying to learn the little bit I know about knives, and the quality of my collection and my interest in knives has slowly expanded from that knowledge.

JShirley
October 22, 2010, 10:02 AM
Erik,

I carried a Desert Cruiser for a while in Afghanistan. It was a pretty good knife, if heavy.

Bill,

You are hijacking the thread. Start your own thread if you need to pontificate about what countries people should buy products from. Spyderco has made knives in various countries for years. They only began making two models in China (with the Spyderco brand: they've sold their Byrd bargain line for some years) when they were certain they could maintain high quality control. I've bought one. It was a good knife, and better than many US-made knives.

John

dairycreek
October 23, 2010, 01:24 AM
I have several CRKT knifes and they all have been highly reliable knifes. I use one as an EDC and it has never failed me. The company has excellent customer service. Nothing more to say except that they are a quality product.

GMHAYESUSN
October 24, 2010, 10:17 PM
Ive got 2 versions of the same knife and love it my only issue was the belt clips getting loose but a little locktite fixed that

p35
October 25, 2010, 10:10 PM
Every time someone asks "is this a good self defense weapon" I think of this:
http://www.designobserver.com/archives/shiv1.html


It's not the tool, it's the user. In a fight I doubt the difference between, say, a Mora craftsman's knife and a $300 custom will be the difference between survival and getting killed.

Note that I don't say "winning" because in a knife fight you're gonna get cut even if you walk away.

rockheadd
October 26, 2010, 12:49 AM
Good knives for the most part. Best thing about them is they are pretty inexpensive, so if you lose it, you won't cry.
If you are in a line of work where the probability of using it to save your life or someone else is high, I'd go Benchmark as they are pretty much top of the line in the production field. Spyderco makes some crazy sharp edged knives that are very nice as well. I'd trust one of those without a problem.
I've had three CRKT knives and they have all done what I asked of them. Not the smoothest folding actions, don't hold an edge like some others, but you can get into a very functional folder for under $40.00, so if that's your budget range, go for it.
If you can drop $100+ (very plus in some cases) go with a Benchmade or Spyderco.

Quickdraw Limpsalot
October 27, 2010, 09:22 PM
I carry a CRKT M21 w/ G10 handles (http://www.crkt.com/M2104G) every day, and it's a real workhorse. I touch it up often (as I do all my knives, necessary or not) and it will shave you at any moment. It gets used hard and hasn't disappointed me yet in the year or so I've carried it. There's just something about a big, beautiful spear point that I love.

rockheadd
October 27, 2010, 11:37 PM
I agree Limpsalot...I followed your link and thought "hey that's my knife" but then after I pulled mine out of my pocket I have the M-1603Z which is a little brother with a thinner blade profile.
Either way, they work and work and work.
For non-everyday outings, the Benchmade Emerson CQC7 is my choice, but I'd hate to hurt it doing evil things to the blade (turning screws, prying hinges, etc...). The M-16...it can take it and if it's damaged...I can get a new one

If you enjoyed reading about "Columbia River Knife,good choice or not?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!