Another professional wounds himself with a Glock .40


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Jubjub
October 12, 2010, 11:44 PM
Reserve Cop Shoots Himself Through Hand, Hits Partner

GARY, Ind. (STMW) - An accidental shooting by a retired Gary police officer left him and his partner wounded as they rode together in a city car Saturday afternoon, Lt. Samuel Roberts said.

Kenneth Shannon, 68, and Joe Leavy, 56, who serve on the city’s reserve police force, are recovering from their injuries.

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2010/10/12/reserve-cop-shoots-himself-through-hand-hits-partner/


Apparently this guy was playing with his new Glock in the car, and managed to put one through his own hand and into his partner. Seems like he's old enough to know better.

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Sgt_R
October 13, 2010, 12:17 AM
Apparently this guy was playing with his new Glock in the car, and managed to put one through his own hand and into his partner. Seems like he's old enough to know better.

Sounds like less of an equipment issue, and more of a training / common sense issue to me. Though I'm sure the Glock haters are going to come out of the woodwork about how it would have been impossible to do that with any other handgun. ;)

R

Drail
October 13, 2010, 12:26 AM
"Never let your muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy" Guess that's too hard for some people to remember.:banghead:

Big_E
October 13, 2010, 12:26 AM
Uh oh, I had better tell my dad and every LEO in my home town and across the country that G22's are dangerous. :rolleyes:

This is just a training issue and negligence. I hope both of them will be okay.

slicksleeve
October 13, 2010, 12:30 AM
I have a feeling he would have commited that little blunder with any pistol.

leadcounsel
October 13, 2010, 08:48 AM
Barely newsworthy...

I'm in the military and have served with very professional individuals, some of the most highly trained Soldiers the world has had to offer. And negligent discharges are surprisingly not uncommon.

Lest someone thing I think they are excusable, they are not. However, they are not uncommon. Sometimes folks get injured, and sometimes by the grace of God nobody gets injured.

sig228
October 13, 2010, 08:56 AM
Lately, it seems that when this happens to a LEO, its an accidental discharge, but when it happens to an ordinary citizen, its an "arrestable" offense. Sigh.....:(

Ragnar Danneskjold
October 13, 2010, 09:19 AM
Seems like he's old enough to know better.

Actually, seem like he might be part of the "I'm too experienced and wizened to have to follow those stupid rules for you whippersnappers" contingent. Some people have been doing things their way for so long, that the idea of changing or following the rules of others is an affront to their years of experience.

youngda9
October 13, 2010, 09:24 AM
^^ Ragnar, you can take comfort knowing that oughta knock him off his high horse.

He broke all the rules at once...a sure recipe for disaster.

doc2rn
October 13, 2010, 09:28 AM
He broke all the rules at once...a sure recipe for disaster.

Stupid should hurt!
Buying a Glock should hurt more :what::neener::D

TraditionalCatholic
October 13, 2010, 09:28 AM
He was "playing with the gun" in the car? Simply unbelievable. I'm not a big fan of Glock, but, this guy most likely could have done the same thing with any other handgun.

oldfool
October 13, 2010, 09:36 AM
yeah, I dunno why Glock guys so quick to take offense or leap to defense where none is required
idiots come in every make/model/caliber... nobody said different

robert garner
October 13, 2010, 09:38 AM
The Glock22 is dangerous? Of course it is; if it weren't it would be useless!
Unfortunately the cop is dangerous,and now two get to "tote the note"
robert

Guns and more
October 13, 2010, 10:19 AM
Another professional wounds himself with a Glock .40
How's that trigger safety working out?

Sevenfaces
October 13, 2010, 10:24 AM
Hey, if you're gonna be dumb you gotta be tough.

The Sarge
October 13, 2010, 10:29 AM
In High School ( one million years ago) our Drivers Ed teacher ran a red light and KO'd one of the students driving to school.

After 40+ years of air conditioning work and being in a kazillion attics my old man finally stepped off a beam and fell through an attic.

Emeril Lagasse put fish stock in his lasagna sauce once.

It happens.

joe_security
October 13, 2010, 10:33 AM
I worked armored transport, over 20 years ago. The manager told the new hires: " If you leave it in the holster, it cant hurt you ".

VegasAR15
October 13, 2010, 10:40 AM
How's that trigger safety working out?

It is working pretty good on the Glock27 that I carry all the time. I just don't pull the trigger when I am not trying to shoot it.

svtruth
October 13, 2010, 10:43 AM
how many close calls he had over the years, sweeping companions, putting his finger on the trigger when he was not contemplating firing, making adjustments on a loaded firearm, etc.

Bovice
October 13, 2010, 10:48 AM
It is working pretty good on the Glock27 that I carry all the time. I just don't pull the trigger when I am not trying to shoot it.

that's true of any gun... i guess i don't see the point of a "trigger safety"

alohachris
October 13, 2010, 01:16 PM
Can't give details (HIPPA) but last week we treated a police officer who shot themselves through the thigh while 'manipulating their firearm' at the start of their shift. The pistol was a .40 Glock. Medically, this syndrome is known as 'Glock Leg'.

:)

DoubleTapDrew
October 13, 2010, 01:18 PM
How's that trigger safety working out?
Maybe Glock pistols need to come with an insert stating "You must be this smart to ride this ride"

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v257/knitepoet/Handguns/finger-up.jpg

I am glad they are ok and nobody was killed although that was a very painful reminder of the 4 rules.

fiat128
October 13, 2010, 01:22 PM
I bet his partner is pissed!

9mmepiphany
October 13, 2010, 01:54 PM
I'm not excusing his breaking more than one rule of safe gun handling, but the first thing that came to mind when reading the article was that they are both old enough to have started their careers in the days of revolvers.

I'm thinking they believed the Range Master when they were issued their guns and told they were DAO, just like your revolver...NOT.

I do see it as a training issue. That is why Glock used to send teams out to departments to train their staff when they first transitioned to the Glock. Their labeling of their action as DAO has really helped their acceptance in the LE community, but there is a downside to not understanding that use of that nomenclature was a rule beater

The Lone Haranguer
October 13, 2010, 01:56 PM
How's that trigger safety working out?
It isn't proof against an idiot wrapping his finger around it and pulling it. The trouble with trying to make things foolproof is that a bigger fool will always come along. :p

leadcounsel
October 13, 2010, 02:00 PM
How's that trigger safety working out?

No offense, but that is an ignorant statement. Pulling the trigger on ANY gun, while pointed in an unsafe direction, and not knowing the condition of the weapon (loaded/unloaded) is plain dumb (correct that - criminally dumb and negligent) no matter what.

I personally know of a Soldier that had an ND with a 1911 (everyone's favorite platform!), under the most absurdly stupid of situations where he was TOLD it was loaded and still pulled the trigger!!!! To say "it can happen to anyone" is carelessly wrong. It only happens to people that are wrecklessly careless. Ahh the stories I could tell...

Prion
October 13, 2010, 02:00 PM
Of course Glocks are dangerous, they wouldn't be much good if they weren't.

Unfortunately, people make them needlessly dangerous through operator error.

I don't own a Glock and I won't bash it when it's obviously not the guns fault.

Ragnar Danneskjold
October 13, 2010, 02:04 PM
The trigger safety did exactly what it's supposed to do: discharge the weapon only when the trigger is pulled and nothing else.

Unfortunately the idiot in the story did not do what he's supposed to do: follow the 4 Rules.

twofifty
October 13, 2010, 03:11 PM
9mmepiphany, I don't understand what you mean here about Glocks and revolvers, though I know what a DAO action is.

Are you saying some officers do not realize the Glock is striker fired rather than hammer fired?

Quote:
"I'm thinking they believed the Range Master when they were issued their guns and told they were DAO, just like your revolver...NOT.

I do see it as a training issue. That is why Glock used to send teams out to departments to train their staff when they first transitioned to the Glock. Their labeling of their action as DAO has really helped their acceptance in the LE community, but there is a downside to not understanding that use of that nomenclature was a rule beater "

oldbanjo
October 13, 2010, 03:21 PM
They did the same thing with Revolvers but if no one was hurt it wasn't reported. There are plenty of holes in cars. It's careless people not bad guns.

9mmepiphany
October 13, 2010, 03:22 PM
Are you saying some officers do not realize the Glock is striker fired rather than hammer fired?

What I'm saying is that when you say "DAO, just like a revolver" to someone who carried a revolver for most of their career, What they hear is, "It has a 10-12lb trigger pull that has a lot of travel built into it (why NYPD asked for the NY-1 trigger module on their G19s) and if it doesn't fire, just pull the trigger again"

There are plenty of holes in cars. It's careless people not bad guns.
Never underestimate what non-gun people will do to guns. It wasn't too uncommon to find car mounted shotgun barrels used as ashtrays or trashcans

rondog
October 13, 2010, 05:24 PM
"I'm the only one in this car professional enough to handle a Glock .40"... BOOM!

swinokur
October 13, 2010, 05:40 PM
Had to be his Serpa.

:neener::evil:

Enachos
October 13, 2010, 05:47 PM
Yeah, I heard about this on the way to work this morning... shame shame.

9mmforMe
October 13, 2010, 06:13 PM
-Shannon told Patrolman Shanesha Emmons he placed a loaded magazine into the newly purchased handgun then put his left hand over the barrel when the weapon discharged.


And you know that evil self firing handgun was just waiting for his southpaw to cover the muzzle only to blow a hole in him...it must have been pissed to have left the warmth and comfort of its display case.

KBintheSLC
October 13, 2010, 07:26 PM
The OP is more a testament to the skill level of the average cop than it is to the actual gun. My neighbor is an LEO and he recently had a ND inside the house (his gun even had a manual safety). Luckily, nobody was hurt. I invited him to the range one time and he informed me that he hadn't fired a gun in over 6 months! And he is full-time permanent, not a temp.

Ironically, he is trusted to carry a gun every single day.

Ike R
October 13, 2010, 09:18 PM
I have friends in Law Enforcement that come shoot with me to get tips, I've been amazed at the amount of times I have seen very poor safety habits in them.

One time at a friends private range one of them covered me and my buddy so many times with his muzzle with the saftey off, finger on trigger and the AR in ready to fire mode that my friend threated to shoot him if he did it again.

I think the officer should be charged and prosecuted just like any other citizen would be. Police officers are civilians and citizens and though they think they are above the law, they are not.

CoastieShep
October 13, 2010, 09:22 PM
Probably wouldn't have happened with a revolver.:neener:

KodiakBeer
October 13, 2010, 10:12 PM
Trigger + Finger = BANG!

It doesn't seem all that complicated to me...

JoeMal
October 13, 2010, 10:16 PM
Maybe Glock pistols need to come with an insert stating "You must be this smart to ride this ride"Hilarious...love it

52grain
October 13, 2010, 10:57 PM
The local sheriff's department has had at least two and maybe three firearms related accidents within the last 12-18 months.

Guns and more
October 13, 2010, 10:59 PM
No offense, but that is an ignorant statement.
Ha. I love tweaking the "Glock-o-philes" over the silly trigger safety.

Justin
October 14, 2010, 01:22 AM
So you admit to making deliberately false statements in order to inflame those who know what you're saying is incorrect?

Where I'm from, there's a name for that: Trolling.

Guns and more
October 14, 2010, 12:09 PM
So you admit to making deliberately false statements in order to inflame those who know what you're saying is incorrect?
Not at all. Where did you get that from what I wrote?
I admit making true statements that I know will inflame those who know what I say is correct, but doesn't fit their opinion.
Evidently, like you.

nathan
October 14, 2010, 03:44 PM
It aint easy to have an accident like this. I hope the cop s involved will get better.

eye5600
October 14, 2010, 04:30 PM
The question is whether ND accidents happen more often with Glocks than with other pistols. If 30% of LEOs carry Glocks and they have 30% of the accidents, then no, Glocks are not especially dangerous. If 30% carry Glocks and they have 60% of the accidents, then yes.

Without all the number, you're just guessing.

Justin
October 14, 2010, 04:58 PM
Not at all. Where did you get that from what I wrote?
I admit making true statements that I know will inflame those who know what I say is correct, but doesn't fit their opinion.

Your first post was clearly meant to be inflammatory, and upon re-reading it, you're right, I take back what I said about making a comment that's deliberately untrue. There would actually have to be some usable content in the post, rather than just a snarky rhetorical question for that to be the case.

Evidently, like you.

I don't care one way or another what operating system people prefer to use in a firearm. I'm certainly not a Glock fanboy by any stretch of the imagination. That said, the Glock system has proven to be a robust and functional one for anyone with enough functional synaptic connections to realize that following basic safety procedures is a good idea.

FIVETWOSEVEN
October 14, 2010, 05:44 PM
Could happen with any gun, it being a Glock .40 is nothing too crazy considering how many ill-trained LEO carry one. This is something that could even happen to someone carrying a Nagant 1895. I am not biased towards Glock by the way, I don't even like them because of how they feel in my hand. But just because they don't feel right in my hand doesn't make it a bad gun.

Sediment
October 14, 2010, 06:15 PM
A wise man once told me "Keep your booger hook off the bang switch." Funny how people who have a ND are so quick to say "It just went off."

Since the gun was likely brand new or refurbished, I will risk assuming it was in good working order. I own a Glock simply for the reason that it just plain works. If a round is in the chamber it will fire every time.

It shouldn't surprise me that a lot of LEO's aren't "gun guys", but I would think that more would be since it is a tool you must be intimately familiar with in the line of duty.

Guns and more
October 14, 2010, 06:27 PM
I'm certainly not a Glock fanboy by any stretch of the imagination.
Okay, me neither. I will admit they are reliable, durable, and inexpensive firearms.
Before I get anyone wound up, I see a safety mounted on the frame as being a real safety.
Safety on, pull the trigger, no bang. Same with a slide mounted safety.
But a trigger mounted safety? Pull the trigger, bang.
Now in this case, a lot of things had to be done wrong. Obviously, he pulled the trigger, obviously he didn't clear his weapon, and most importantly, he had it aimed at a person he didn't intend (we presume) to shoot.
He would have done the same thing with a double action with no safety.
I hope the victim recovers.

Ky Larry
October 14, 2010, 08:45 PM
1. Treat all weapons as if they were loaded.

2. Never point a weapon at anything you are not willing to shoot.

3. Keep your booger hook off the bang switch until you are ready to fire.

People, this ain't rocket surgery.

Sig88
October 15, 2010, 02:22 PM
Its really absurd to hear about all these so called "professionals" accidentally shooting themselves.

coloradokevin
October 15, 2010, 02:32 PM
Can't give details (HIPPA) but last week we treated a police officer who shot themselves through the thigh while 'manipulating their firearm' at the start of their shift. The pistol was a .40 Glock. Medically, this syndrome is known as 'Glock Leg'.

A guy in my department shot himself in the leg a few years ago. He was attempting to disassemble his Glock in his patrol car, and pointed it at his thigh when he pulled the trigger. The officer nearly died from his wound, and probably would have if it wasn't for another officer who heard the shot and came to his rescue.

I'm not sure why this is called "Glock Leg" in your part of the country? This could happen with any pistol, and is a testament to the results of carelessness and bad judgment more than it is a problem with the pistol. Should anyone really be surprised that a gun goes off when you pull the trigger?

Let us review:

1) Never let the muzzle of the weapon point at anything you aren't willing to destroy.

2) Keep your finger off of the trigger and out of the trigger guard until your sights are on target and you are ready to fire.

3) Treat all weapons as if they are always loaded.

4) Always be certain of your target, and what lies beyond.


If you manage to shoot yourself with a Glock without first violating at least two of these safety rules, I'd love to hear about it!

oldfool
October 16, 2010, 01:36 AM
Its really absurd to hear about all these so called "professionals" accidentally shooting themselves.
yes it is
but it could be a lot worse

if all the not-gun-people who do the same dumb stuff every day got media attention the way not-gun-people cops do, that would scare the snot out of everybody, and we would have a really serious PR problem on our hands, because only about 99% of those stories are never told to anybody, much less the media
but odds are really high that any cop who does that is going to make the news

most LEOS don't practice enough, nor take gun safety seriously enough
which mostly makes them just like non-cops who don't hang out on gun forums and practice enough
being a gun owner requires a few hundred bucks, at most
most anybody can do that, if they want to

ain't defending any cop who can't pay attention
but the notion that cops are any better/worse than the general populace is naive

no argument implied that every law abiding citizen should NOT own guns
just saying that defending rights for all, which do need defending, is no excuse for lack of equal enthusiasm for personal responsibility, but no excuse for cop bashing

idiots come in all make/model/calibers... and all occupations
joe-the-plumber doesn't get his face on TV all that often, and joe-the-baker or candlestick maker doesn't either
but "they" are just as likely to blow a hole in their TV set as joe-the-cop
but when they do, it probably won't be the lead on the evening "news" channel
real likely joe-the-cop will be

thank gawd, all "joes" who do that are not on the TV
even though they all "ought" be (???)

the good news is, a lot more joes are exercising their rights lately
the bad news is, a lot more joes are exercising their rights lately
the worse news is joe ain't you, and freedom cannot be had absent risk

worry a little less about the 'professionals' and worry a little more about non-professional joe-average-me
there are a lot more of me, than there are of them, you know

rondog
October 16, 2010, 02:25 AM
I know there was a LEO here in the Denver area that was shot in the leg when he was holstering his Glock at the range and the hem of his jacket got in the trigger guard and tripped the trigger. Wouldn't surprise me if there were others it's happened to.

KodiakBeer
October 16, 2010, 03:15 AM
I know there was a LEO here in the Denver area that was shot in the leg when he was holstering his Glock at the range and the hem of his jacket got in the trigger guard and tripped the trigger.

Or, he made that up after keeping his finger on the trigger while holstering his gun.

Vikingsoftpaw
October 16, 2010, 04:56 AM
It sounds like the old 'Loose Nut behind the Trigger' problem.

shockwave
October 16, 2010, 09:30 AM
in this case, a lot of things had to be done wrong. Obviously, he pulled the trigger, obviously he didn't clear his weapon, and most importantly, he had it aimed at a person he didn't intend (we presume) to shoot.

Yes. And then there's also this:

he placed a loaded magazine into the newly purchased handgun then put his left hand over the barrel

Unless you're cleaning the gun, I can't see any normal handling procedure that would ever have you covering the barrel with the palm of your hand. Something really went wrong here, such that a person with a firearm was in possession of the weapon yet had no training or no understanding of safe procedures.

From time to time, we discuss here (and elsewhere) the idea that maybe some kind of mandatory training certificate should be required before a person can obtain a firearm. There are reasons why that's a bad idea, but cases like this one argue in the other direction. They don't settle the matter - not by a longshot. Still...

bobmcd
October 16, 2010, 12:46 PM
Palm-over-muzzle sounds a lot like the "Bugs Bunny safety" on the M1911A1 ... if the slide is pushed back out of battery, the pistol won't shoot (like Bugs sticking his finger into Elmer Fudd's barrel). Perhaps the ND was due to pushing back on the slide to see if the weapon would shoot?

swinokur
October 16, 2010, 12:50 PM
you're not describing a press check are you? you can't see into the chamber of a Glock like a 1911.

If that's not what you're describing, never mind.

trex1310
October 16, 2010, 01:17 PM
From time to time, we discuss here (and elsewhere) the idea that maybe some kind of mandatory training certificate should be required before a person can obtain a firearm.

Even if you had some type of mandatory training certificate, I would bet
my last dollar that someone would still blow a hole in themselves.

bobmcd
October 16, 2010, 01:27 PM
No. The 1911 has (if I remember the rigamarole correctly) has one safety and four safety features. The safety is the actual mechanical safety; the safety features are the grip safety, the half-cock notch, the disconnector, and .... uh, something else. (Dang. I knew I couldn't remember them all.)

Anyway, if you push a 1911 into something (like your opponent's torso) so that the slide and barrel are moved back even slightly, the hammer will not fall. Not a safety per se, but a "safety feature". And I believe that a few bored GI's shot themselves through the palm of the hand when "demonstrating" the fact that a 1911 will not fire if the slide is pushed back (for example, by shoving the muzzle into the palm of your left hand).

I don't know if a Glock Fo-tay has such a "safety feature", but like I said in my earlier post: when a guy shoots himself through the palm of his hand, I immediately think about the "Bugs Bunny safety".

swinokur
October 16, 2010, 01:35 PM
training won't help ND. You cannot fix stupid

swinokur
October 16, 2010, 01:45 PM
Series 80 Colts and series II Kimbers have firing pin safeties. Maybe that's no. 4?

A Glock will not fire if the slide is out of battery

61chalk
October 16, 2010, 01:47 PM
As Ted Nugent would say...."Accidents don't happen, they are caused."

Ragnar Danneskjold
October 16, 2010, 02:10 PM
From time to time, we discuss here (and elsewhere) the idea that maybe some kind of mandatory training certificate should be required before a person can obtain a firearm. There are reasons why that's a bad idea, but cases like this one argue in the other direction. They don't settle the matter - not by a longshot. Still...

Well, the price of liberty is eternal vigilance. Part of that vigilance is not being around idiots who might hurt you with firearms. Once can either turn over their liberty to the government, and hope that their licenses, courses, agencies, and bureaucracies will keep you safe, or you can keep your liberty but have it be on your own head to keep yourself safe from others. I'll pick the latter.

JoeSlomo
October 16, 2010, 02:23 PM
Steps required to prevent the unintended discharge of human waste:

1. Identify the need.
2. Identify and move to appropriate disposal location.
3. Clear path of clothing for unimpeded access to disposal receptor.
4. Assume proper position over disposal receptor prior to discharge.

Steps required to prevent the unintended discharge of a round from a firearm:

1. Don't pull the trigger.


Amazing how people can maintain the discipline needed to perform the multiple steps required to eliminate human waste, but fail to maintain the discipline needed to perform the ONE task required to prevent a negligent discharge.

Doucme2
October 16, 2010, 03:30 PM
Im 66 years old, retired with 39 years on as a police officer. A friend of mine brought a 380 he bought at a gun show for me to check out. He told me he hadn't loaded it but just to make sure, I dropped the mag., racked the slide several times, pointed it at my tv and promptly killed it. Broken extractor. Unknown how long the weapon had been loaded. You're never too old screw up. I thank God every day it was only a tv.

Coolbreeze8804
October 16, 2010, 07:42 PM
Im 66 years old, retired with 39 years on as a police officer. A friend of mine brought a 380 he bought at a gun show for me to check out. He told me he hadn't loaded it but just to make sure, I dropped the mag., racked the slide several times, pointed it at my tv and promptly killed it. Broken extractor. Unknown how long the weapon had been loaded. You're never too old screw up. I thank God every day it was only a tv.

Ha! THAT's funny. I, at the tender age of 14 or so, after repeatedly cycling the action of an old winchester 94 that had been leaning in my Grandfathers living room in the corner for over 30 years. (I, and many others had cycled it and dry fired it numerous times. My Gramps had done "triggerwork" on it which was a source of pride for him) Since he "didn't hunt it anymore" he had "filed the end off the firing pin" so that we could all experience his prowess as a gunsmith. Lucky me! I found the round that was apparently stuck up in the mag tube AND discoved that the old dear hadn't filed enough of the firing pin, and adroitly placed a round neatly through the window and through an unsupecting crow on the birdbath out back. :what: Gramma tongue lashed us for hours, and the cop that showed up thought it was hilarious.

Times have changed.

And poop still happens... I'm still glad it was a winged varmint, and not one of the 20 or so relatives there for the holiday...

BTW,, I'd rather blame it on the glock. I don't like 'em. they're ugly. but it prolly wasn't the guns fault.

piece of meat
October 17, 2010, 01:09 AM
i dont get why glock cant put some kind of safety on their guns....there really is no reason not to have one. if they had a simple thumb safety id have bought like 5 of them by now

Carter
October 17, 2010, 01:29 AM
i dont get why glock cant put some kind of safety on their guns....there really is no reason not to have one. if they had a simple thumb safety id have bought like 5 of them by now

Thats why I bought an SR9c instead of a glock 26. I don't always use the manuel safety but I'm glad its their. It stays off while its in the holster. Once I pull it out I flick the safety on if I'm putting it up or w/e. If I'm shooting my finger doesn't go near it. I've done this so much now that its reflex and I don't have to think about it.

Even if glocks did have safeties police probably wouldn't use them. The local LEO's used to have beretta's. They never used the safety except to decock the weapon, then promptly turned the safety off again.

ND can happen. But this one was totally preventable.

General Geoff
October 17, 2010, 03:19 AM
i dont get why glock cant put some kind of safety on their guns....there really is no reason not to have one. if they had a simple thumb safety id have bought like 5 of them by now

The Glock has lots of safety features. The main one being the trigger. Don't pull the trigger and the gun won't fire. I don't see how it could possibly be any simpler.


Amazing how people can maintain the discipline needed to perform the multiple steps required to eliminate human waste, but fail to maintain the discipline needed to perform the ONE task required to prevent a negligent discharge.

My theory is that they're taught how to eliminate human waste when they're toddlers, but don't learn gun safety usually until they're well into adulthood. It's harder to learn new routines, the older you get.

Sunray
October 17, 2010, 03:36 AM
"...this guy was playing with his new Glock in the car..." It isn't the pistol. It's poor training.

The Lone Haranguer
October 17, 2010, 08:41 AM
i dont get why glock cant put some kind of safety on their guns....
He put his finger on the trigger and pulled it. I doubt if a thumb safety would have prevented this.

The Lone Haranguer
October 17, 2010, 08:53 AM
What did he think he was "playing" with? :rolleyes: It's a gun, not a plush bunny. :pI'm not excusing his breaking more than one rule of safe gun handling, but the first thing that came to mind when reading the article was that they are both old enough to have started their careers in the days of revolvers.

Very plausible. A revolver, with a ~10-12 lb. pull over a ~3/4-inch arc, is more forgiving of stupid handling than a Glock whose trigger is about half that.

friscolatchi
October 17, 2010, 08:55 AM
Rule 1: Minimize the risks. Rule 2: Remember Rule 1.
Handle only when holstering/unholstering, unloading or shooting. Remember the basic tenents of gun handling.

The Lone Haranguer
October 17, 2010, 09:06 AM
deleted

rscalzo
October 17, 2010, 09:09 AM
From time to time, we discuss here (and elsewhere) the idea that maybe some kind of mandatory training certificate should be required before a person can obtain a firearm.

What department do you know that doesn't require qualification annually? As far as nd's, I see them often enough as a range officer at the club. The only difference is, we aren't required to report it to anyone if no one is injured.

alsaqr
October 17, 2010, 10:08 AM
Just maybe the guy ain't so professional after all. What professional would play with a gun inside a squad car with his partner present?

The finger on the bang switch trick got a double this time. :(

rscalzo
October 17, 2010, 04:51 PM
Its really absurd to hear about all these so called "professionals" accidentally shooting themselves.

No more absurd that someone buying handguns, not knowing anything about it then shooting a friend.

N.H. man shoots self in leg after buying gun at show

http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20101017-NEWS-101019840

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