Newbie Reloading Questions


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Sherri
October 15, 2010, 08:13 PM
Hello, All.

I loaded up 50 rounds of .32 S&W using once-fired Fiocchi brass, Speer 98gr HBWC, CCI primers and 2gr of Unique.

I took them to the range to see how accurately they flew and they seemed to be fine, so I came home and loaded up another 150. I've since sent another 75 or so downrange, and several (9 to be exact), didn't go bang. I don't recall if any of the first 50 failed to go bang. (I get that I need to keep better notes.)

In the meantime, I realized I'd neglected to install the powder measure failsafe rod on the press (Dillon Square Deal), and wondered if perhaps these rounds hadn't gotten a charge. Today, I disassembled the dud rounds, confirmed they were loaded and carefully weighed each load--they varied from 1.9 to 2.2. The COAL of my rounds are near 0.970 (Speer #14 specifies 0.920). I've inspected the cases of the rounds that went bang, and see no signs of excessive pressure.

I acquired the primers at a gun show, and assume I got some bad ones. I'll dig the packages out of the trash and note the lot numbers.

Questions...

Is it safe to deprime the shells that didn't go bang? Should I put them in my revolver and strike them again (no powder or bullet) to be sure? Or are they scrap?

Based on seeing no signs of excessive pressure, and on a longer COAL, I'm inclined to fire the remaining rounds. (I'm firing them through a Ruger SP-101 32 H&R.) Does this seem reasonable?

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bds
October 15, 2010, 08:21 PM
Just to rule out high primers, can you fire the cases that didn't go bang? (Of course, with no powder/bullet in the case - I usually fire primer only cases in the garage with doors/windows closed - it is a loud POP, so you may want to wear hearing protection).

If they fire on second/third attempt, your primers were not seated deep enough.

If they still don't fire on second/third attempt, then primers are suspect to be bad.

Skip_a_roo
October 15, 2010, 08:26 PM
Sherri,

What you may have had was some primers that were only partially seated. I own 3 Square Deals and have done that on occassion. What happens is this; the primer is fully seated with the first hammer fall and most of the time, they won't go bang. (That is called a failure to fire or FTF.)

You aren't the first one to do that and you certainly won't be the last!

The other thing that might have happened is that the anvil in the primer fell out. I would be curious as to what brand you were using. I have caught a couple like that with Wolf although none of them made it to the firing line.

As for depriming the brass. Yes it can be done on the press, CAREFULLY! Remove all powder from the area, take the measure off of the press. Wear safety glasses and gloves too. If it were me, I'd also make sure that there were no live primers in the primer tube, simply empty it out. Go slow. Remember how they are designed to go bang, force exerted on the cup side, make sure the spent primer is falling out of the press. I have a friend that didn't notice them building up until the press was jammed up pretty bad.

So, careful as you go!

dc.fireman
October 15, 2010, 09:44 PM
Welcome to The High Road!

Steve C
October 15, 2010, 09:50 PM
Most of the time a FTF with a new loader is the failure to seat the primer until it bottoms out in the primer pocket. Often this is the worry about "crushing" the primer. Don't worry about crushing a primer, it takes lots of force and even a crushed or deformed primer will fire the round on the first try where one not seated fully will not.

Sherri
October 15, 2010, 10:24 PM
Thanks to everyone for the kind responses and welcome. Firemen rock in my book.

I put my calipers on those nine shells, and sure enough, there's a sliver of light either side of the primer. Wow, that's a subtle thing. I'll work on a consistent seat-the-primer stroke. My reloading buddy thought I was a little hard on the lever, Steve. Evidently not.

I'll let the hammer fall on the cases tomorrow and see if they'll fire. Thanks bds for the tip about hearing protection--I would not have expected a loud bang and would have gone at the first one without my "ears". I think I'll also call my gun-friendly neighbor and ask her to listen--if she can hear the primers fire, I don't need to be messing with that in my garage and will save it for the range.

The primers were CCI, skip. I'll look for missing anvils (not sure what exactly I'm looking for, but I'll figure it out). Listening for the primer to drop will be a good habit to develop, too--thanks for sharing your friend's unfortunate experience. All of your safety suggestions are noted and will be followed.

I notice no one touched my second question. I'll take that as an indication that I'm not way out of line and will proceed with caution. I'm not worried about double loads--I was really careful about that. The first 100 .38 I loaded, not so much. I may tear those apart and start over. It would be a real shame to damage my Colt.

Steve C
October 15, 2010, 10:33 PM
delete

rfwobbly
October 15, 2010, 10:34 PM
Sherri -
Welcome to THR !

• Agree it may be your seating, but also note.... if your primers came in a red and black box then they are probably Wolf brand which was all that was available a few months ago. These are third rate primers, and 1 or 2 per thousand don't go off on a usual basis. Next time you buy, try to get Federal, Winchester, CCI, or some other American brand.

• Noted your powder variations, which are worrisome in such a small cartridge. Dillon makes a wonderful powder measure and variations of that magnitude are not common. If you are using the small powder bar in your powder measure, then you may need to buy the "Extra Small Powder Bar" which is suggested for tiny charges such as you are using.

Click Here and Take a Look
(http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/23601/catid/3/Dillon_X_Small_Powder_Bar)
If you would like a second opinion, then call Dillon and they will help you. Your powder charges should be right on the money, especially with a fluffy powder like Unique.

Shoot safe. All the best.

Sherri
October 15, 2010, 11:34 PM
Hi, rfwobbly.

Thank you for the kind welcome.

The primers are CCI and the boxes are not red and black. (Primarily white and gray or blue, I think.) I'm going to pound those primers some tomorrow and see if they fire. I'll post my findings.

Thanks for the info. 1 or 2 failing per 1000 seems like a pretty low number, but as I've typed that I've considered the odds that a defensive round would fail. Yikes! That's not good enough by a long shot.

As I was loading those rounds, I was checking the charge every 10 or so. I noticed a little creep, but I didn't appreciate until today, disassembling and weighing the charges, that the little drift I saw with my mechanical scale represented as much as .2gr. That's a lot with this small load. I was also (today) cross-referencing those charges on the Franklin Arsenal electronic scale my husband ordered for me. Scooting the pan about on the scale displayed weights that differed by as much as .2gr. With these tiny loads, what should I believe?

I was not aware Dillon offered an "Extra Small Powder Bar". I'll give them a call tomorrow. My press is not new--perhaps my powder measure is not up to snuff?

I came home from a gun show with a Ruger SP-101 chambered in 32 that shoots like butter. I didn't appreciate that finding ammo would be challenging, and that's what's led me into reloading. I'd like to use the 32 for warm up in place of a 22 if I can find a reasonbly priced way to do so.

bds
October 16, 2010, 12:05 AM
1 or 2 failing per 1000 seems like a pretty low number, but as I've typed that I've considered the odds that a defensive round would fail. Yikes! That's not good enough by a long shot.
As discussed on several threads previously, primers should not fail.

Many mention of a "few" primers failing out of 1000 being "OK". I disagree. All reloads should be assembled to go "bang" for obvious reasons. Seating them flush is not deep enough - seat them slightly below flush (- 0.004") to set the primer anvil against the priming compound in the cup.

Here's a nice guide on proper primer seating. (http://www.forsterproducts.com/store.asp?pid=24822) (scroll down the page towards the bottom)
A Primer On Primer Seating

The following three drawings illustrate the critical nature of accurate primer seating.

Illus. 1: IMPROPERLY SEATED - This primer is improperly seated, preventing the cups of the primers from resting solidly on the bottom of the primer. Some primer cups measure .120” in height, and if seated with crowns more than .004” below the case head, the anvil would be forced through the crown, rendering the primer useless.

Illus. 2: IMPROPERLY SEATED - This primer is improperly seated too high. A high primer is erratic in performance. It is also dangerous and could explode in the chamber of a rifle when the breech block closes on it before it is locked.

Illus. 3: PROPERLY SEATED - This primer is properly seated, exactly as it would be with our Co-Ax® Reloading Press. The crown is .004” below the surface of the case head; the anvils are on the bottom of the primer well; and the primer mix is properly stressed by the anvil for sensitivity. It is also much safer than either of the two seated primers shown above.

http://www.forsterproducts.com/client_images/catalog19938/pages/images/press_art2.gif

Sunray
October 16, 2010, 12:30 AM
"...varied from 1.9 to 2.2..." Hi. That's not good for target ammo. Never been a big fan of progressives for new reloaders. Too many things to get just right when you don't understand the process. However, Dillon's customer service is excellent.
"...Ruger SP-101 chambered in 32..." .32 what? H&R mag? Just curious.

bensdad
October 16, 2010, 01:01 AM
cross-referencing those charges on the Franklin Arsenal electronic scale my husband ordered for me. Scooting the pan about on the scale displayed weights that differed by as much as .2gr. With these tiny loads, what should I believe?

None of them. Use a beam scale.

noylj
October 16, 2010, 01:46 AM
1) I sure hope that you aren't really reloading .32S&W with wadcutters, unless they are seated way out. You should be using at least a .32 S&W Long for wadcutters.
2) If you have an electronic balance that does not read consistently, no matter where the powder is in the pan, then you need to contact the manufacturer. The pan should have a locator cavity that it fits into consistently.
3) No matter if you have a 16th century beam balance or a 20th century electronic balance, you have to shield it from any breezes. I know people so intense, they breathe on the scale and wonder why it doesn't read consistently.
4) If you can load wadcutters that are as accurate as factory .32 S&W Long wadcutters, you are doing a LOT better than I am.

Sunray
October 16, 2010, 02:01 AM
"...hope that you aren't really reloading .32 S&W with wadcutters..." There are two .32 S&W's. Long and Short. The Short is long obsolete and isn't the same thing.
"...If you can load wadcutters that are as accurate as factory..." None of the guys I know who use high end .32 target pistols, all of which are .32 S&W Long,(think 2 grand and up) would ever think of using factory ammo.

Skip_a_roo
October 16, 2010, 08:18 AM
Sherri,

Using the Square Deal B is a great way to build ammo. Even for a novice, and I'm not demeaning you for being one, I am too in many ways and have been reloading for several decades. When we think "we have arrived" in this hobby, it usually means we haven't really! :D

Unique in that caliber, through that powder measure, at that weight though is not the best choice. Unique is a good powder for midrange type of loads BUT it meters like big bricks and at that charge weight, it may be VERY inconsistent. I don't think you are going to have a problem with the loads you have loaded BUT, I would like to suggest another powder to you. There are several, and here is one of those things us handloaders seem to argue about, that will meter better through your press. Kind of like Fords and Chevy. If you use them as designed, either will work for you. Depends on what you want in your driveway! ;)

#1: Bullseye: Old reliable. Not the "cleanest", whatever that means, but it will work and be as accurate as any other powder that has come out during its 100+ year of existence! Period!
#2: Accurate Arms #2: This powder is a small grained ball powder and measures like "whotideum", consistent numbers and accuracy is very, very good.
#3: W231/HP-38: This is an old timer too. Flattened ball that will give good results with just about any caliber you use it in.
#4: Titegroup: Personally, I don't like this powder BUT it does have a following. It is so dense, a little weighs so much, in most cases someone can put in a triple charge and not notice. That being said, that is not going to happen on your Square Deal B unless you do a big no-no, manually index the press backwards with cartridges in it.

Another safety tip with the Square Deal or any other progressive for that matter, NEVER GO BACKWARDS! If a mistake is thought to have been made, clear the press out in the direction it was meant to be run in.

I have made a modification to my Dillon presses for the spent primers to go into a coffee can. I'll see if I can find a picture and post it. I do have a tip to remember your setup for the Square Deal press, take a look:

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Reloading/SBDSetup2.jpg

I write down the numbers for each station in my caliber change box and when I go to load that caliber again, I have a starting point. Makes it nice for the powder die, which can be a pain in the rump to adjust once you have powder in the measure!

(p.s. I know there is rust on the press in this picture. I have 3 Square Deal presses and purchased them all used. Some folks just don't take care of things like they should. It doesn't look like this now!)


My ammo factory!
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Reloading/goodoverviewangle.jpg
Hope this helps!

Skip_a_roo
October 16, 2010, 08:50 AM
Found them:


I have the advantage of going to MSC. It is an industrial supply house. I bought some hose barbs that were 3/8" tubing to 1/8" NPT. I had a tap and threaded the hole in the bottom of the press. Since it is cast aluminum, great care must be taken not to strip it out by going too fast or not using a tapping fluid. Once tapped, I cleaned it with brake cleaner, carefully and screwed it in. The hose is 3/8" ID and pushes right on. The rest is pretty self explanatory! ;)
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Reloading/3lbcan1.jpg

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Reloading/SquareDealPrimerMod2.jpg

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Reloading/SquareDealPrimerMod1.jpg

rfwobbly
October 16, 2010, 01:25 PM
Thank you for the kind welcome.
It's the only "high road" thing to do. :)

The primers are CCI...
Those are quality items and you'll find none better. Please, ignore my feeble comments.

Thanks for the info. 1 or 2 failing per 1000 seems like a pretty low number, but as I've typed that I've considered the odds that a defensive round would fail. Yikes! That's not good enough by a long shot.
Per-zactly.

As I was loading those rounds, I was checking the charge every 10 or so. I noticed a little creep, but I didn't appreciate until today, disassembling and weighing the charges, that the little drift I saw with my mechanical scale represented as much as .2gr. That's a lot with this small load.
Exactly my point. If you were loading 8.0gr, then we probably wouldn't fuss too much with 0.2gr variation. But what you need to consider is the variation as a percentage of what you're trying to achieve. 0.2gr on an 8gr load is 2.5% variation, whereas 0.2gr on a 2.0gr load is 10% variation. :eek:


I was also (today) cross-referencing those charges on the Franklin Arsenal electronic scale my husband ordered for me. Scooting the pan about on the scale displayed weights that differed by as much as .2gr. With these tiny loads, what should I believe?
Those loads are tiny. As others have said, you need to set the scale on a very stable surface, turn off all the fans and vents, don't breathe on the scale, check for a stable power source, etc, etc. to get an accurate reading. In the end, I'm not sure I would trust just any old scale to a measurement that small, especially when your safety depends on it. It would almost have to be an electronic scale in excess of $300 or an Ohaus balance scale with gem stone bearings.

I'm NOT saying your scale isn't up to the task. I frankly know nothing of the scale you mentioned. However I do have experience that says that less expensive electronic scales have given me the largest reading variations on the smaller loads. If the scale's range is from 0-1000gr, then reading 2.0gr is going to be awfully hard. If the scale's range is from 0-10gr, then 2.0gr is going to be a much easier proposition.

I was not aware Dillon offered an "Extra Small Powder Bar". I'll give them a call tomorrow. My press is not new--perhaps my powder measure is not up to snuff?
Do not worry. Your Dillon powder measure is one of the very best measures out there. (Your husband must love you very much. :D ) You only need the addition of the Extra Small Powder Bar for this load. It is designed precisely for loads in the 0.5 to 3.0gr range. With a voluminous powder like Unique, that occupies a huge space compared to other powders, the ESPB should measure 2.0gr right on the money.

I came home from a gun show with a Ruger SP-101 chambered in 32 that shoots like butter. I didn't appreciate that finding ammo would be challenging, and that's what's led me into reloading. I'd like to use the 32 for warm up in place of a 22 if I can find a reasonably priced way to do so.
Oh, you've found it. You just needed some tips on machine setup to get you going in the right direction and add to your safety. Accurate powder measurement will reduce the variations in bullet speed. When each bullet travels the same speed, they tend to hit in the same place on a target each time. So as your variation in powder goes down, your groups will likewise improve.

All the best. ;)

Sherri
October 16, 2010, 04:14 PM
Thanks for the primer primer, bds.

>> Never been a big fan of progressives for new reloaders.

Roger that, Sunray. I'll take measured, careful steps. The Ruger SP-101 is chambered in 32 H&R.

bensdad--when I said "mechanical scale", I meant beam. Gravity's pretty constant, I'll rely on it. Who took your bullets?

noylj--I'm loading .32 S&W Long. Sorry if I wasn't clear. There is not a locator cavity on the electronic scale. I just dropped a primed case on the scale and compared it to the beam. It's spot on at 51.4. I'll have to experiment with it.

I have some factory wadcutters. I'll save them to compare with my own loads when I can shoot over a chronograph.

Skip--I have a '95 Pathfinder in my driveway. What does that say about me?

"Clean" is important to me. I bought a bunch of Aguila rounds and they're downright nasty--my shooting pal complains of the smell when he's downwind, and the revolver is fouled to the point of the cylinder jamming after 50 or so rounds. Ick. I sure hope the brass loads ok. Unique seems to burn pretty clean. I'll be checking out some other powders. Thanks for the suggestions.

I didn't know you could push the press backwards. At the tiniest glitch, I pull everything out and make SURE I know the state of things before proceeding.

rfwobbly--The electronic scale is a Frankford (not Franklin) Arsenal DS-750 with a max capacity of 50g and the beam is a Lyman 500. I'll spend some time today measuring out 2gr on the beam and see how 5x and 10x measures up on both scales.

I'll call Monday and order a ESPB.

Yarddog
October 16, 2010, 08:14 PM
Sherri,
I have the same scale as you, DS-750 Franford Arsenal It reads within .01 of my Beams ; ) PS A little trick to save on Battery life, I tunn light of, When I can JMO
Y/D

Sherri
October 17, 2010, 02:21 AM
Hi, Y/D.

The DS-750 is new and I don't have much experience with it. I was pushing the pan around on the scale with a 2gr powder load in it, and saw variations in readings that made me nervous. I need to spend some time with it to understand where and to what degree I can trust it.

Sherri
October 17, 2010, 03:15 AM
All but one of the FTF primers popped when I let the hammer fall once or twice. The last one took 10 more strikes and still didn't pop. So, the diagnosis of poorly seated primers is spot on.

I think my next step is to load 1.8, 1.9, and 2.0 (carefully measured!) in some of the Aguila brass and shoot that over a chronograph.

Thanks again to everyone for the kind responses.

Sherri

SASS#23149
October 17, 2010, 10:53 AM
when seating prmers on my sdb, I push FIRMLY up on the handle,and hold it for a three count,just to avoid the possibility of any 'bounce back'.
that 3 count won't slow you down enough to worry about,and I do find I get more consistant ignition...my guns are sprung light...doing it this way.I do the same thing on my 550b.
neiher of my dillon measures is spot on,never have been .what I've found with several different brands of measures is to give the hopper a light knuckle rap ...2 actually..as I'm reaching for a new piece of brass to insert. works wonders for accurate dumps.
keeping the hopper very full helps also.

Skip_a_roo
October 17, 2010, 12:31 PM
I purchased this low powder sensor for my Dillon machines. One will do, you just have to move it around is all. It puts pressure on the powder and helps with consistency. Another thing I have heard of is using an aquarium pump, taped to the side of the powder measure, to aid in vibrating the powder into the drop part of the measure.

Never done that though! ;)
http://www.dillonprecision.com/uimages/missing_images/16306_dillon_low_powder_sensor.jpg

Sherri
October 18, 2010, 12:16 AM
Today was an interesting exercise.

Having had trouble with seating primers, I figured it would be good to size and clear the primers from some brass, then tumble them some before seating primers.

I came across a piece of Aguila brass with a lengthwise split. I'm not sure what to make of this. It's one piece of brass in 200+ I've looked at closely. These are cases from commercial S&W Long rounds I've shot in my .32 H&R Mag SP101.

I have quite a lot of this (Aguila) and was hoping the cases were good for reloading. They're not pleasant to shoot (they foul my revolver, and my shooting buddies complain of the stench).

My day went further south when I dropped 100 primers into the feeding tube and most of them fell in the bucket, and the rest jammed up the press. 75 of them are retrieved and back in the package, and there's some number still in the feeding tube. A ginger pull on the press meets with resistance, so I called it a night. I'll figure it out tomorrow when I can get a competent buddy on the phone.

Am I having fun yet? Yes. :)

I'll be slapping the hopper, for sure.

Sherri
October 18, 2010, 12:43 AM
Hi, Skip.

Looking at your picture, it just registered how helpful that would be. Did you get that from Dillon?

I'm calling them tomorrow.

Skip_a_roo
October 18, 2010, 05:39 AM
Sherri,
Yes I did. Like most stuff from them, it costs! ;) It is a useful tool. Since I am using progressive equipment I have tailored my powder choices accordingly. Unique just isn't one of them for the Dillons. Just me, others haven't had a problem, I chose to make sure I don't! :D I do use it with my Lyman #57 on top of the Lee Turret. That measure has a "knocker" right on the side of it though, problem solved.

As for you primer situation. Here is what is wrong. At the bottom of the inside tube of the primer magazine, there is a little plastic piece. That is bad, allowing the primers to free fall into the primer apparatus. If the knurled know is loose, or was loosened when there were primers in the magazine, it is possible that it isn't seated correctly now.

There are three allen screws on the front of the machine that you can take out. Nothing is going to fall apart if you take them out, the primer unit is self contained. Take them out and you will be able to find the rest of your primers lurking about in the bottom of the press, clear them out and throw them away. Dump the remaining primers or you will have another mess on your hands! ;)

Unscrew the knurled knob, remove the magazine tube and inspect the plastic tip. Call Dillon and tell them that it is bad and they will have more on the way free of charge.

When reassembling, make sure it is positioned correctly. It fits into a slot in the bottom of the larger tube. Carefully rotate the magazine until you "feel" them line up and gently seat the magazine before screwing on the knurled knob.

If you have a manual, let me know what the date is on it or go to dillonprecision.com and download the latest and greatest and I will give you numbers to go by. It'll help with my explanation of how to fix your problem.

And hey, I'm gonna say this again, and don't forget it, you aren't the first to have these sorts of problems. I have been working on industrial machinery for over 30 years, stuff happens. It doesn't say anything about your abilities, skills or the press itself. Its just a machine. You will master it and when you do, it will be great! That little turkey will produce more ammo in 1 hour than most will produce in 5 and they will be quality target rounds.

Hang in there kiddo! :D

(We are strange people that call this fun anyway! But I do too!)

Sherri
October 19, 2010, 12:41 AM
Hi, Skip.

The primer return pin spring snapped last week and I called to order a replacement. They sent me a new manual, so I'm up to date (May 2007).

This morning I pulled the primer unit off and ran down the remaining primers--all 100 accounted for. (It really helps to make a point of having a clean bucket under the press--I spent nearly an hour sorting through the trash.)

After a frustrating morning, I bagged it and went to lunch with my sister.

This afternoon, I took a lot of it apart. I messed with the crimp and the seating and finally got things looking right. Spoke with Lee at Dillon Precision and they're sending me a new plastic thingy and the ESPB. I didn't order the lid and compression weight (or whatever it's called)--I forgot and then didn't call back.

I tried loading up small quantities of primers with uneven results, and finally gave that up. I settled on a rhythym of: drop a primer in position two (tweezers are good), load a piece of brass into position one, guide a bullet into place in position three, pulling the press once, giving a firm stroke to seat the primer, and pulling a second time to charge and eject a finished cartridge. I weighed the powder every 10 times. I'm confident that the 175 or so I loaded today do not exceed 2gr. 100 of them have primers that should be 100%. The rest have primers that were abused--I couldn't throw them away.

My friend is bringing his chronograph to the range tomorrow and it will all go hurtling at paper. I'll report back.

The press does not get to win. :)

Skip_a_roo
October 19, 2010, 05:40 AM
Hi, Skip.

The press does not get to win. :)

Sherri,

It sounds like you have uncommon common sense coupled with a never die attitude! I like that! Wish I had a younger brother and you had a little sister! :D

While not using tweezers, I have done exactly like you have when the primer mechanism messed up, every other slot got a case. That let me drop a primer in manually in the empty slot.

There is one other thing that can cause a problem in the primer apparatus. It is the little pin that comes in and out that holds the next primer up in the magazine. They used to be steel, now they are plastic. I have had that stick and allow primers to slide right out which gives the same results as the previously described problem, only for a different reason.

Manually cycle the press with no primers. You should see the pin move in and out and do it freely. There is a little piece of black spring steel over the pin, right on the front of the machine. With each stroke of the press it should move in and out without any assistance.

As a "cheat" on the spring that broke: Go to the hardware and see if they have something close. It ain't rocket science. Another work around is to bend another "loop" on the end of it. Simply take a turn or two of the spring at the end, using needle nose pliers, and bend it at 90* to the main body. Trust me, it will work until you get a replacement as long as the plastic "finger" hoot-n-nanny on the bottom of the magazine is still good.

At any rate, sounds like you are working through your problems just fine. This is one thing with buying used stuff. Not a bad thing, all but my XL650 were purchased the exact same way. Only difference is, I had one that had a cracked frame! Sent it in, that cost me, got it repaired for free, now son #1 has a "near new" press and has started reloading!

Gotta love the Dillon guarantee!

Sherri
October 19, 2010, 09:58 AM
Skip,

We "repaired" the broken spring with a washer.

I misplaced the primer cup and powder measure lid, and ordered those along with replacement springs. The primer cup turned up last night, in the bottom of the cover. I still haven't found the lid.

I bought this press from a friend (he upgraded to an RL 550B). He made me a fair deal, and has been most generous with his time helping me get it set up. I think I did just fine.

I'll keep an eye on the pin. There may be an issue there. Meanwhile, taking things slow is not a bad thing.

The next project is to figure out a good 9mm load for my Glock 19.

Have a great day!

Sherri
October 28, 2010, 11:57 PM
Here's an update...

My friend and I took some of my .32 loads to the range and shot it over the chronograph. It wasn't the greatest day, light-wise, but what readings we did get pointed to 1.9-2.0 loads.

I got busy and loaded up all of my brass with 2 grains of Unique. I shot some of it yesterday, bench rest at 30'. It's not drilling single holes, but it's certainly flying straight enough for my shooting abilities. My friend and I had a nice time with that Ruger yesterday. It's a sweetie.

As for my primer feeding problems... turns out it was not the plastic piece at the end of the magazine. We took apart the feeding mechanism, gave it a good cleaning, and applied a little grease at the end of the pin that pushes against the spring. It's worked well for some 300-400 primers, so I think I'm GTG.

The extra small powder bar is setting on my bench, but I haven't tried it out--I found I was getting very consistent 2 grain charges when I got in the habit of giving the powder tube a tap or two (and keeping it well-fed).

And it looks like it will be worth the effort to clean the primer seats on the Aguila brass. Some of my rounds needed a second strike to fire, and I think this is due to the crud left behind on the initial firing. I discovered a split case (first firing) when I was looking things over at the bench, and then saw a split case at the range yesterday (don't remember if it was a first or second reload). There were no other signs of excessive pressure, so will assume poor brass quality. I'll be keeping my eyes open.

Thanks again to all who provided help and feedback. I appreciate it!

Skip_a_roo
October 29, 2010, 06:20 AM
Well, just proves that I can be wrong! :) There, I admitted it! (OUCH!)

Honestly, I'm just glad you found the problem and got it working. That is the most important thing.

Enjoy this aspect of your shooting hobby. Have fun and be safe.

bds
October 29, 2010, 10:54 AM
Great job! I love happy endings. :D

rfwobbly
October 29, 2010, 01:19 PM
Sherri -
And how did the Extra Small Powder bar work out for you ??

Inquiring minds want to know. :D

Sherri
October 31, 2010, 10:01 PM
rfwobbly-

The extra small powder bar is setting on my bench, but I haven't tried it out--I found I was getting very consistent 2 grain charges when I got in the habit of giving the powder tube a tap or two (and keeping it well-fed).

Skip-

Well, I had a good supply of the plastic pieces for the magazine, and now it's a lifetime supply--that issue won't slow me down again. :)

Took my new CED chronograph out for a test run on Friday. I haven't yet pulled the numbers to my laptop, but I think I've got lots of good data to guide me.

Won't do it here, but I need to open a thread on my unruly Glocks.

Chat with you all soon.

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