G21SF trigger creep


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GLOOB
October 22, 2010, 09:25 PM
So I have shot (and/or bought) many a regular-frame (9mm and .40) Glock since buying my first - a G21SF. The trigger on all of these Glocks is consistently smooth and light... and much better than my G21SF's. My G21 trigger is a tad heavier, which is no problem. But there is a bit of creep, and it's inconsistent.

I read that the striker pull distance was larger on these pistols, compared to the smaller frame guns, so the trigger is always going to be a bit heavier. But I also read that the early G21SF's, specifically, were made with a batch of rough trigger bars. Well, I polished the bar until it practically gleamed, everywhere, and it made no difference. I dry fired it several thousand times, and if anything it might have gotten a tad worse over time. So I finally decided to buy a new stock trigger and disconnector.

The new trigger helped quite a bit. Swapping for a new (same #5) disconnector helped a bit more. I can't tell what, if any, difference there is, but the new parts helped. There's still a tiny hint of creep left, but extremely small. I also tried swapping in the 8 lb disconnector, and I like this the best. The creep is pretty much imperceptible with this setup.

So has anyone else had a Glock with trigger creep? If so, did you figure out what caused it? I polished the original trigger bar and disconnector pretty much everywhere I could imagine any contact with anything... and it made no difference. It was still complete crap compared to the brand new replacement parts. The engaging surface on the striker looks perfect, too, btw.

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Geno
October 22, 2010, 09:28 PM
My own G21-SF was flawless, just too large in the grip.

Geno

DonRon
October 23, 2010, 12:03 AM
Try upping the trigger spring to a 6 lb with a Wolf or a Zev.

Sapper771
October 23, 2010, 10:33 AM
GLOOB,

I don't know how far you went with polishing, but I would recommend a 25 cent polish job. It is basically a fluff and buff, but it does work. I took mine a bit further and started out with 400 grit sand paper and worked over most of the areas. After I finished with the 400 grit I then did the same with a piece of 600 grit. After the 600 I used 1000 grit to finish. Once I was done using the sandpaper I used a dremel with a polishing wheel and some fitz. This gave all the areas involved in the 25 cent trigger job a nice bright shine. I normally do this polish job on most of my Glocks. Some of them take to the polish job better than others. The trigger will usually get even smoother after about 500+ rounds.

This may help with the creep issue.

GLOOB
October 23, 2010, 04:14 PM
I went pretty far with the polish job. And after I got my new trigger bar and disconnectors, I went whole hog on the old parts in an attempt to figure out the "why" part. The flat part of the trigger/disconnector interface is like a mirror. I even polished the top edge of the trigger bar in that area. I polished the point that pushes up the FP block. There's no metal-to-metal surface that isn't gleaming from buffing compound polish.

I guess I was wondering if there was any part of the frame that could be causing the problem. Because I switched out the trigger parts, and there is STILL that tiny hint of creep that I haven't noticed in any other Glock. The only other parts I can think of that would seem to matter much is the FP block and the striker engagement surface. But I think I have ruled these out.

The creep occurs (sometimes) after the initial takeup, and pressure starts to build at the break point.

DonRon
October 23, 2010, 04:35 PM
Aren't you just removing the nickle plating Glock uses for lubricant with all that buffing and sanding. If you see copper, that part is now screwed because the copper is the undercoat that hold the nickle on to the steel. I can't tell you how many Glocks I have repaired because of the .25 cent trigger job.

DonRon
October 23, 2010, 04:41 PM
I went pretty far with the polish job. And after I got my new trigger bar and disconnectors, I went whole hog on the old parts in an attempt to figure out the "why" part. The flat part of the trigger/disconnector interface is like a mirror. I even polished the top edge of the trigger bar in that area. I polished the point that pushes up the FP block. There's no metal-to-metal surface that isn't gleaming from buffing compound polish.

I guess I was wondering if there was any part of the frame that could be causing the problem. Because I switched out the trigger parts, and there is STILL that tiny hint of creep that I haven't noticed in any other Glock. The only other parts I can think of that would seem to matter much is the FP block and the striker engagement surface. But I think I have ruled these out.

The creep occurs (sometimes) after the initial takeup, and pressure starts to build at the break point.
The pressure build up is the final compression of the striker spring before the trigger bar is cammed down for release by the connector. New spring retainer cups and a cleaning of the striker with alcohol might help or there could also be some petroleum lube in the poly striker channel liner gumming up the free movement.

GLOOB
October 23, 2010, 09:18 PM
The striker and channel are both spotlessly clean. I detail clean this gun way too often. But I will look at the cups. Maybe the spring is catching on something. That's a good thought.

As for the nickel finish, you are right. The nickel and copper are completely gone from all the major contact points on this trigger bar and disconnector. It had worn through certain parts, and I just helped it along, stoning parts flat again, sanding and polishing! I think the bare steel surfaces should be good enough, but what do I know?

DonRon
October 23, 2010, 09:52 PM
The striker and channel are both spotlessly clean. I detail clean this gun way too often. But I will look at the cups. Maybe the spring is catching on something. That's a good thought.

As for the nickel finish, you are right. The nickel and copper are completely gone from all the major contact points on this trigger bar and disconnector. It had worn through certain parts, and I just helped it along, stoning parts flat again, sanding and polishing! I think the bare steel surfaces should be good enough, but what do I know?
Without the nickel you have totally defeated an integral part of the Glock design. The striker is also nickle plated and if you stripped that as well the nickel against polymer lubrication is gone as well. The striker is going to be the most expensive part to replace but if there was wear through, that Glock was not properly lubricated. I have seen 20 year old very high round count Glocks with no wear on the nickel plating. Sounds like you got a rebuilding process.

GLOOB
October 24, 2010, 01:35 AM
I never touched the striker other than cleaning. The only parts altered were the trigger bar and the disconnector. And they have already been replaced. That's good to know though. I wonder what good the .25 cent trigger job really is, then. I know mine didn't help one bit. My other Glocks are stock and awesome. And this one is as good as it's ever been, with all stock parts, no buffing.

DonRon
October 24, 2010, 11:40 PM
Did you buff or polish the drop safety striker plunger or the spring and extractor set up in the slide?. Did you get any petroleum lube on the striker plunger or in the channel it rides in? The .25 cent trigger job just ruins a Glock in my opinion. Don't you think Glock would have done it if was needed!

Now that click sound you hear on trigger reset is the connector snapping back under the trigger bar. There is an tab that protrudes on the connector that rides in the channel of the slide upper. This is an area the requires grease in my opinion. I use Gun Butter Grease and it is durable and non migrating.

Sapper771
October 25, 2010, 12:01 AM
I have not observed any negative after effects from the polishing, even after having done 35-40 different pistols. This is actually the first time I have heard of it ruining a Glock. I am sure that some have taken too far and removed too much material or messed around in the wrong place, but that's their fault.

A lot of the competition guys I have shot with recommend the trigger job.

But like GLOOB said, what do I know.....LOL

David E
October 25, 2010, 12:09 AM
Don't you think Glock would have done it if was needed!

No.

It is needed because they don't do it.

GLOOB
November 17, 2010, 07:47 AM
I think I may have figured it out.

I cleaned and lightly lubed the main moving parts of the gun and put the 5# disconnector back in. Then I played with the trigger. That's when I heard it. There was an audible click right at the point where the creep sometimes occurs.

Putting my ear right against the gun, (and this is a weird feeling, pulling the trigger of a gun right next to your ear!) and dry firing it, I could locate the click to the firing pin safety plunger. Because it engages off center on the .45 model, I think the trigger bar might actually be passing the plateau of the plunger at this stage in the trigger pull, close to the break. This might explain the difference in feel between this model and the regular frame Glocks.

KBintheSLC
November 17, 2010, 04:29 PM
started out with 400 grit sand paper and worked over most of the areas
I am doubtful that sandpaper is a safe method for doing the $0.25 trigger job. Even 400-800 grit will remove material. The goal is not to remove material here. I have always used a Dremmel with some fine jewelers rouge. It does not remove any of the plating, and merely polishes it to a mirror shine. Once you chew through the nickel plating, its game over for that part.

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