Can You Field Strip & Reassemble While Blindfolded?


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CWL
January 23, 2003, 04:18 PM
How well do you think you know your firearms?

Stripping & reassembling a weapon while blindfolded is basic training for your average teenage terrorist/insurgent and I bet most of us have never even given it a thought.

Given that most armed encounters are at night, I think that people who spend mucho time punching paper should come to the realization that, if hell does break loose, Murphy will come calling. You could be hiding in your house or holed up in a ditch somewhere with help far far away when you experience that malfunction.

Learn to strip & reassemble your weapons (at least SD & SHTF guns) in total darkness. You'll need to know your weapon by feel in order to diagnose any failures and clear a malfunction.

Try it with gloves on as well as with a light coating of oil on your hands to simulate sweat. Try this one-handed or with the weak hand. All sobering experiences.

So far, I OK with my 1911's, P7's, Kahr, Glocks, ARs, AKs, bolt rifles, and Remmy 870. Probably OK with Sigs and Beretta.

I'm screwed if it was down to my M1A or Ruger MKII.

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GoldenLoki
January 23, 2003, 04:30 PM
Probably a skill that would be of value is clearing malfunctions in the dark, one hand etc.

However rather than take down / reassembly. I'd spend time and effort training to access my BUG.

Much quicker into action and I am more likey to have IT than the part to fix any breakage in my primary.

The ability to take down / reassembly blindfolded couldn't hurt anything, just not needed IMHO.

GL

Chris Rhines
January 23, 2003, 04:32 PM
Field-stripping? Why? I mean, I can strip and reassemble my CZs with my eyes closed, but does that really serve a lot of purpose? I just learned how to do it because it looked cool.

Now if you're talking malfunction drills, then I totally agree. I do type 1, 2, and 3 clearance drills, both hands as well as strong- and weak-hand only. Useful skill to have.

- Chris

Mauserlady
January 23, 2003, 04:39 PM
Now if you're talking malfunction drills, then I totally agree. I do type 1, 2, and 3 clearance drills

Elaborate please. I have never heard of this, what are these drills.

As for field stripping... Never tried it but I'm pretty confident that I could do the P89 and the MKII with no problems.

dacinokc
January 23, 2003, 05:07 PM
While I have not had any compelling need to do "lights out" drills for about 10 years, I am pretty sure that I could still do them. Not something one forgets exactly....

4v50 Gary
January 23, 2003, 05:23 PM
Yes, so long as the parts don't roll away or go orbital. What I can't do is detail strip them. Need the Mark I eyeball for that.

Watch-Six
January 23, 2003, 05:25 PM
It's not only basic training for teenage terrorists, but for US Army soldiers as well. At least it was when I was one. I wouldn't be worried in assembling/disassembling any gun that I own in the dark, especially a M16/AR15. Watch-Six

SteyrAUG
January 23, 2003, 05:36 PM
When I was a kid I learned how to do a 1911 in the dark when I was told by my Grandfather that they had to be able to do it in the Army Air Corps (15th AF).

I know I couldn't do all of them, but my HKs, AKs and ARs I'm sure I could. They are pretty simple.

Mike Irwin
January 23, 2003, 05:41 PM
Depends on whether I can get my shirt off/on over the blindfold... :)

Never tried it, actually, but I'm familiar enough with S&W revolvers that I think I would be able to make a pretty good stab at it.

Monkeyleg
January 23, 2003, 05:52 PM
I could field strip my 1911 blindfolded, but doing so would require scratching it, which I don't want to do. Ditto my AR.

But, if you're in a "SHTF" situation, would you have time to field-strip, and why?

WhoKnowsWho
January 23, 2003, 06:03 PM
Try it with your hands tied together and blindfolded! :D

gryphon
January 23, 2003, 06:11 PM
No. I see no value in it.

bbrins
January 23, 2003, 06:53 PM
I can field strip my AK, SKS, and Mauser and reassemble without looking. I don't really see much practical use for it, but it is a good way to test how familiar you are with your firearms.

bedlamite
January 23, 2003, 07:05 PM
I can do it with my Ruger 22/45. That's been good for a few $5 bets.

Lone_Gunman
January 23, 2003, 07:18 PM
Why would I ever need to field strip a gun in total darkness?

I can think of no practical situation where that might be necessary.

SteyrAUG
January 23, 2003, 07:56 PM
Why would I ever need to field strip a gun in total darkness?

I can think of no practical situation where that might be necessary.

And the answer is...

In the albeit remote possibility you have to service your weapon in a low light/no power situation.

Art Eatman
January 23, 2003, 08:08 PM
Field-strip and re-assemble the 1911 and the Garand while blindfolded was part of high-school ROTC for me, in 1950. I understand that now in college ROTC they use wooden imitation ARs...

:), Art

dacinokc
January 23, 2003, 08:10 PM
In a firefight at night, prior to nightvision on every helmet, it was a very relevent skill to have, and yes, it can be done when the SHTF

Dave R
January 23, 2003, 08:11 PM
I'm pretty sure I could handle the Rem 700 in total blackout.

falconer
January 23, 2003, 08:22 PM
When I bought my first handgun (ruger P90), my father felt that if I was going to have my own weapon I should know it very well. So I wasn't allowed to shoot it until I could show proper handling, cleaning, and field stripping of the weapon (including with my eyes closed).

I can strip all my guns blindfolded. Doesn't really serve much function other than making me pretty quick with my eyes open.

Chris Rhines
January 23, 2003, 08:23 PM
Mauserlady -

Type 1, 2, 3 (and 4) are nicknames for the most common forms of malfunctions that you get in semi-automatic small arms.

A Type 1 malf is a failure to feed. The round gets hung up before the chamber. A common cause is failure to fully seat the magazine. Clear this malfunction by giving the mag a good smack, then rack the slide to chamber another round.

A Type 2 malf is a failure to fire. Bad cartridge, something along those lines. Clear it in the same way as a Type 1 malf.

A Type 3 malf is nasty, a failure to extract. There's a spent casing stuck in the chamber and another round is trying to feed into it. To clear, first rip the magazine out (it probably won't drop free.) Either discard the magazine or stick it under your pinky. Rack the slide several times, look for the stuck shell to be ejected. Once the chamber is clear, replace the magazine and rack the slide to chamber a round.

Note - try this one-handed sometime for real fun and games!

A Type 4 malf is a failure-to-eject or a stovepipe. Clear it by vigorously racking the slide. Sometimes you can sweep the stuck casing away my running your hand over it.

Hope this helped.

- Chris

Lone_Gunman
January 23, 2003, 08:24 PM
Wouldnt it be easier just to use another weapon til the sun comes up, and then fix the dang thing in the daylight?

El Rojo
January 23, 2003, 08:31 PM
I would think if you were under fire, it might be more helpful to find a new weapon. However, in Vietnam, I remember reading about how some screwed together soldiers had to carry around a cleaning rod taped to their forearm somewhere so they could clear jams in tight situations and they did it. Why you would have to field strip it in the middle of a dark night battle, I don't know.

When I was a young lad of 18 (seven years ago!) I used to practice popping the cleaning kit out of the buttstock of my SKS, taking out the trigger group and fixed magazine, replacing the trigger group, and then inserting a detachable mag. I got to where I could do it with my eyes closed in under a minute.

I can take my Glock and Taurus apart blind folded. Sometimes it is just fun to do when you are bored.

Poohgyrr
January 23, 2003, 08:32 PM
Field stripping any carry handgun isn't that big of a deal unless I get careless. In darkness, I haven't but with care should be able to detail strip the Glocks. Other guns I probably couldn't detail strip in the daylight, let alone darkness. I'm always willing to learn, although I may not like the experience itself.....

Mauserlady
January 23, 2003, 08:36 PM
Thank you Chris for the explanation.

Know them well and have practiced through experience. :D I had just never heard them referred too in numerical form like that.

Edward429451
January 23, 2003, 08:41 PM
However rather than take down / reassembly. I'd spend time and effort training to access my BUG.

How bout doin it in the dark with your BUG in your hand?:D

I practice it with my 1911 sometimes when I'm bored. After the barrel link pin became worn it was next to impossible. Now I've replaced it so its relatively easy again.

I'd hesitate to call it a skill with the Glock, AR, or 700. Havent tried it with the 870 yet.

Wait till morning? Most peoples BUG's are not as combat worthy as their primary, so being able to get it going again may just help a whooole bunch (its along time till the sun comes up!)

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