Rifle consistantly shot 1 inch left @100Y, 3-4 inch right @ 200Y


PDA






cbfan87
November 6, 2010, 03:10 PM
I'm not sure what this means.

I was definitely shooting left at 100

Flinching?

Canted sight?

Adjusted windage about 3/4 to 1 MOA left at 200 and was hitting bullseye.

Makes no since.

Remington 700, 300 win mag W 4-12X nikon scope


Has anybody seen something like this? If so what was the cause?

Deer season starts in two weeks and Id like to be confident shooting out to 300 yards.

If you enjoyed reading about "Rifle consistantly shot 1 inch left @100Y, 3-4 inch right @ 200Y" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
GunTech
November 6, 2010, 03:13 PM
Are you changing the power on the scope? Changing shooting position when you shoot at farther targets?

cbfan87
November 6, 2010, 03:19 PM
12x at both ranges.

Position should be pretty much the same though off two different picnic tables so I did change where I was shooting (my range has a 100 yard and 400 yard range).

Float Pilot
November 6, 2010, 03:25 PM
Your scope is not perfectly vertical. Or you are canting.. So the adjustments made to increase the range setting wander off to one side. A very common problem.

Set up your targets with some easy to see vertical lines.
Take a bubble level to the range and make sure your target lines are really vertical. ( A crooked target line makes things worse) ... If your scope is correctly mounted, you should be able to adjust your shots straight up the line.
If the shots wander off to one side further and further as you click your scope adjustments upward, then your scope is not properly aligned.

cbfan87
November 6, 2010, 03:36 PM
Your scope is not perfectly vertical. Or you are canting.. So the adjustments made to increase the range setting wander off to one side. A very common problem.

Set up your targets with some easy to see vertical lines.
Take a bubble level to the range and make sure your target lines are really vertical. ( A crooked target line makes things worse) ... If your scope is correctly mounted, you should be able to adjust your shots straight up the line.
If the shots wander off to one side further and further as you click your scope adjustments upward, then your scope is not properly aligned.
I'm not exactly sure what you mean. Are you saying my scope in mounted roated to the left or right? So that when I adjust for range the point of impact is moved on the vertical line which will be further right or left because of this?

How can I use a bubble level to make sure I'm mounted right?

cbfan87
November 6, 2010, 03:44 PM
Your scope is not perfectly vertical. Or you are canting.. So the adjustments made to increase the range setting wander off to one side. A very common problem.

Set up your targets with some easy to see vertical lines.
Take a bubble level to the range and make sure your target lines are really vertical. ( A crooked target line makes things worse) ... If your scope is correctly mounted, you should be able to adjust your shots straight up the line.
If the shots wander off to one side further and further as you click your scope adjustments upward, then your scope is not properly aligned.
I figured out the bubble level part and how to test.

I guess I'm wondering how to mount my scope to that level of accuracy

brettrow
November 6, 2010, 04:36 PM
I use a scope level. http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=529349 and if you use one, take the caps off the elevation nob so the level rests on the actual scope nob, not the cap. If you use this, as you tighten down the scope rings you may have to try it a few times because as you tighten the scope ring screws down, the scope can "spin" and all of a sudden the scope is not level anymore even though it was level when you began to tighten. So you may have to put the scope on "slightly off" then as you tighten ring screws it "corrects" it and becomes level. I then added this http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=327752 so you can know if your canting while in the field.

Float Pilot
November 6, 2010, 05:47 PM
I also found a little bubble level at the hardware store that was originally made to be hung on a line, but it has a flat bottom and works fine as Brother Brettrow describes.
I mount my rifle into my cradle device out in my shop and make sure it (the rifle) is level, then check the scope being level as well. Sometimes tightening the rings can be a HUGE pain in the rear... some brands tend to slightly twist the scope no matter how hard you try not to do so..

I also have a scope alignment target nailed to a spruce tree about 100 yards away from my shop. It has a big cross hair design on it that is correctly set to level. After I mount the scopes, I take the rifle cradle out on the deck and line it up with the cross hairs of the scope, overlapping the level cross-hair drawing on the target. Then I double check to make sure the scope / rifle top is level.

Once a good scope has been zeroed, you should be able to BOX THE TARGET by making adjustments of say 8 clicks in any direction and then go back to zero with the same amount of clicks.

I have met a couple guys who can just look at a scope and tell if it is slightly out of mounting adjustment... I am not one of them,...

Also make sure you are setting the adjustments on your scope.. That usually means that you tap the side of the adjustment section a couple times after making a change in the settings. That makes the little detents pop into place and hold the adjustment. That is why you sometimes see folks who get one or two wild shots after a scope adjustment change and then everything settles down.. The recoil makes the adjustment parts move sometimes to the next little internal notch.

steven58
November 6, 2010, 06:40 PM
I have used a variety of magnetic level sets and small hardware levels. They suck.

1) Sooner rather than later you have a rifle where there are no flats on the receiver and or on the scope (yeah, I know, take the turret caps off and you have a flat. Maybe. Some adjustments are by a finger knob not a flat disc)

2) Even if there are flats on the scope you are truing up the scope body. What if there is a slight difference to the reticle inside the scope?

This is what I have started using recently.

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/sid=14989/sku/Vertical_Reticle_Instrument

It's perfect! I've used it on many different bolt actions, semi autos AR type rifles, single shots and lever actions. No problems. I even had all of my friends give me their scoped rifles to true up. So far it works on every one I have tried it on.

It actually trues the reticle to the rifle, not just the scope body.

Here's how it works from the parent company:

http://www.microlevel.biz/vertical_retical_instrument.html

Plus, its built solidly out of machined Al. Probably pass this down to my kids.

mbogo
November 6, 2010, 07:43 PM
Your bullet may be encountering crosswinds going in different directions at different ranges.

mbogo

cbfan87
November 7, 2010, 05:30 PM
Your bullet may be encountering crosswinds going in different directions at different ranges.

mbogo
The wind was blowing directly towards me so the bullet would be fighting the wind

Went to the range today shot at 100 again. I needed to adjust a few clicks to the right (basically undid what I did yesterday). shot well couple 3 shot groups touching.

I really don't know what to think about shooting at range. Don't have time or the shoulder to remount my scope and get the equipment suggested.

Might try the vertical adjustment test suggested above as a sanity check next weekend.

Captcurt
November 7, 2010, 05:51 PM
Does your scope have an Adjustable Objective? You could be having a problem with parallax.

gunnie
November 7, 2010, 06:33 PM
what float pilot has said is likely correct. to make sure before you start tweaking the optic, crank on some more elevation before to make sure the line continues in the same angle of departure as the 200 yard group did.

so far the only way to correctly align the vertical reticle with the bore is the military method. if other means would work, they would have no problem buying the tool capable of doing so, cost no object. to make any offerings of that nature work, absolute alignment would need to be obtained between bbl bore center line and scope vertical reticle. the reticle will not usually/always be plumb/perpendicular with scope knobs, caps or machined surfaces on the adjustment turret body.

draw a vertical line on your target, heavy enough to be seen by your optic with a good 3 foot carpenter's level at 200 yards. use a framing square for the horizontal line, or find a carpenter's level that has both vials agreeing with themselves. (good luck, there) .

to make sure the level is good, check the level against itself by turning it 180 degrees and replacing it in THE SAME PLACE IT WAS, on a fixed object. (read: wall) on multiple vial levels, mark the bubble to make sure you use the same bubble both times. if the level is true, it will read the same both directions. if not centered both times, but the same distance from the bubble vial center, the wall is not level, don't worry.

the framing square can be tested against itself in much the same way.

holding the vertical reticle parallel to the line you have drawn on the target, fire three. crank up on elevation enough to produce a distinctly separate group from first. see if the next group centers on vertical drawn line. when it will the scope vertical reticle is centered on bbl bore centerline.

if it doesn't line up, take my word for it, turn the scope the opposite direction of how it seems it should be turned to correct alignment.

gunnie

cbfan87
November 7, 2010, 07:34 PM
Does your scope have an Adjustable Objective? You could be having a problem with parallax.
Actually My scope does have an knob for this and I did adjust it.

I have thought that may have been a cause of the problem.

Next time I will leave it and see if it shoots true.

Hopefully that what it is.

Otherwise I will do the test that others suggest to see if the POI moves horizontal with vertical adjustment

JDMorris
November 7, 2010, 07:47 PM
Uh.. It was not zeroed, Now it is?

cbfan87
November 7, 2010, 07:52 PM
Uh.. It was not zeroed, Now it is?
There is a paralax setting for yardage. I adjusted it for 200 yards.

Maybe I should have just left it at 100.

My scope was sighted in. What do you mean zeroed?

JDMorris
November 7, 2010, 07:55 PM
zeroed, sighted same thing.. I adjust my my scope in power, distance focus, eyepiece focus, ect. never have issues.

cbfan87
November 7, 2010, 07:58 PM
zeroed, sighted same thing.. I adjust my my scope in power, distance focus, eyepiece focus, ect. never have issues.
Oh gotcha, yea it was definitely sighted in I was shooting 1 - 2 MOA groups (Would be better but Im not that good yet ha)

JDMorris
November 7, 2010, 08:04 PM
takes time. trust me.. still working on keeping my .5 moa consistant.
I would take it to a gun shop, And get Warne rings. Thats what I use and they are amazing.

Captcurt
November 7, 2010, 09:31 PM
Oh gotcha, yea it was definitely sighted in I was shooting 1 - 2 MOA groups (Would be better but Im not that good yet ha)
We all want sub MOA but in all honesty, 2 MOA isn't that bad. Most guns won't shoot 2 inch groups out of the box.

Besides, I have never had a leadsled or even sandbags in my tree stand.

If you enjoyed reading about "Rifle consistantly shot 1 inch left @100Y, 3-4 inch right @ 200Y" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!