Average distance a well hit deer will run


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jlbpa
November 22, 2010, 09:30 PM
I've shoot two deer. One with a 30-30 at about 45 yards and it took a few steps and fell over dead. I shot another with an arrow double lung ran about 30 yards and fell over dead. With my 30-30 and 170 gr winchester superx powerpoint what if I put a shot in the chest vitals or tried to bust up the front shoulder at say 150 yards. If I make a good shot and it runs too far it will be beyond the property I'm allowed on.

Thanks

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Captcurt
November 22, 2010, 09:41 PM
You never know. One deer may drop on the spot and the next may go 100 yds when hit in the same place. Depending on the angle of the animal, I like to take a shoulder out. That usually drops them in their tracks. I know a lot of guys that take neck shots but I don't care for them myself. I feel more confident shooting for the heart/lung area. At my age I need the biggest target that I can get.

desidog
November 22, 2010, 09:42 PM
If I make a good shot and it runs too far it will be beyond the property I'm allowed on.


Now that is the first good reason i've heard to invest in hunting camo. :evil:

Where are you hunting that they allow rifles on such small acreage? That sounds dangerous for the neighbors...I'd be much more worried about the deer that are not hit well. It happens.

ssfeldjager
November 22, 2010, 09:51 PM
Where did the OP state that he was hunting on "small acreage"? I missed that in his post. :scrutiny:

jlbpa
November 22, 2010, 10:12 PM
The acreage is there as long as it doesn't run the wrong way. Since I've only shot a couple deer I'm just looking for the laws of average. On the tv shows they usaually show shooting and the deer runs and then waiting but I'm thinking that's just to make the show last longer. I'm wondering what happens in real life. Things I've shot alot that aren't quite easy to kill I know what I'm doing and where to place the shot and know what to expect. I just haven't shoot enough deer to have a idea of what to expect.

W.E.G.
November 22, 2010, 10:22 PM
I had a four-pointer run 50 yards into a thicket after a close-range through-and-through shot, pulverizing the heart with Remington 30-06 Core-Lokt ammo.

jimmyraythomason
November 22, 2010, 10:31 PM
You never know. One deer may drop on the spot and the next may go 100 yds when hit in the same place. This is exactly right! I've had deer run over 100 yards with a it's heart shot out. I've also had double lungs shot deer fall stone dead. Caliber is a non-factor. I've used 30.06 mostly but have also used 7mm/08 and.308win. Those shot with the .308 ran off,having to be tracked up(double lung) while the 7mm/08 had DRTs as well as run offs to be tracked up. A CNS hit is the ONLY garanteed DRT shot.

JEB
November 22, 2010, 10:36 PM
its really hard to say. with a 30-30 ive seen one deer with half its heart blown off run a full 70 yards before diving up. ive also seen them go down like they were hit by a amc truck with a high lung hit (not spine). if i had to make a guess i would say around 30 yards. lots of them drop on the spot or after only a few steps, but then again a lot of them bolt off after being hit. depends on what is going through the deer's mind at the time of the shot.....btw, if it happens to be a 12ga slug that is going through its mind, they almost always eat the dirt right there!

slicksleeve
November 22, 2010, 10:39 PM
I've shot deer with a .243 win., 7mm-08, .270 win., .44 mag. pistol, .41 mag. pistol, .444 marlin, compound bow, and 12 gauge shotgun. Several of 'em. The only deer that I've had not run off to die was one that I hit in the head with 12 gauge 00 buckshot. At this point, I have accepted that most well hit deer, (through the heart), will go 30-100 yards, running dead. I enjoy tracking deer myself.

brandon_mcg
November 22, 2010, 10:43 PM
The only deer ive dropped was with a .243. Ive shot a few with .308 that have meandered 40-80 yards and have killed one with buckshot that ran 50 yards. however, every deer my brother has shot with his .308 has dropped dead. so who knows. just have to shoot them and see

AKElroy
November 22, 2010, 10:43 PM
I've never had a deer take a step with a center-shoulder broadside hit. I have probably taken 20+ with that shot; not a stellar placement for meat retention, but on reduction game-management cull hunts it prevents having to waist time chasing them down. If I had my freezer full & had a good trophy in my sites, the shoulder is where I am aiming.

I might see a 50 yard run after a solid boiler room shot, but that is rare. A few yards, a stagger, and flop is more typical. I am now hunting with Remmy corelokt exclusively & it really opens up & shreads the vitals. It's also cheap, allowing a lot of practice with the hunting load.

jimmyraythomason
November 22, 2010, 10:45 PM
Remmy corelokt My favorites as well. I have only lost one well hit deer using core-lokts. It was a VERY large buck with great mass. I shot it at bayonet range(actually about 30 feet) broadside with a 7mm/08(Remington Model 7)through the lungs. As the deer ran off,I was distracted by a larger buck that almost stood on me trying to figure what just happened. When I was able to start tracking my buck all I could find was tracks and lost them after about 80 yards. I searched for over 4 hours and never found a blood trail. My brother found what was left by the coyotes about 2 weeks later over 250 yards from the shot.

slicksleeve
November 22, 2010, 10:50 PM
For heaven's sake don't get mad at your 30-30 and go buy a .300 super nitro express short ultra buzz light year magnum, so you won't have to track a deer.

AKElroy
November 22, 2010, 10:53 PM
For heaven's sake don't get mad at your 30-30

Good advice. Some of the fastest DRT dust raising flops were from my tried & true 94's launching 170 gr corelokts. Hits em' like a truck if you do your part.

jimmyraythomason
November 22, 2010, 11:10 PM
AKElroy's mention of the 170gr core-lokts reminded me of the 2 bucks I got with 8x57 mm Mauser using 170gr core-lokts. No tracking of those.

jlbpa
November 22, 2010, 11:11 PM
I'm sticking with the 30-30. I like my marlin 336 bought new at kmart for $79.00 back in the good ole days. Trouble is using the 30-30 I've shot more ground hogs, coons, and chickens [in the head for butchering - I like shooting :)] than deer. I'm just trying to make sure I make the most of it on the deer and do right by the deer. I'll get some cor lokts tomorrow.

41magsnub
November 22, 2010, 11:20 PM
My experience has been if you catch the deer unaware before any adrenalin builds up, a boiler room shot drops it right there or within 10 yards. Just bang.. flop.

If you get one that has the fight/flight response going a non-CNS or non-structural hit will let them run for a short distance.

A poorly placed shot in either case can result in some tracking.

juk
November 22, 2010, 11:23 PM
I have shot a small buck with an 06 (core-lokt) and thought it vanished. Turned out it literally fell over. The deer I hit with a 308 (AMAX) I never found. Made a solid hit, and followed a gnarly blood trail for a few hundred yards. I am now a believer of proper bullet selection and shot placement.

Daniel Boone
November 22, 2010, 11:33 PM
Most times I shoot my deer in the neck.
Makes it a lot easier to gut out - not a lot of blood in the chest cavity and no spilled guts to worry about.
If I shoot one in the neck they usually drop 3 feet - straight down!

I don't think I had to track more then 20 deer in my whole life and I have shot 200 deer so far.

AKElroy
November 22, 2010, 11:59 PM
I never found. Made a solid hit, and followed a gnarly blood trail for a few hundred yards.

Last time I had that happen I looked for hours & finally gave up only to find the animal verticle in a forked tree as I walked out. Never thought to look up, even a foot or two. I bet your animal was within 10 feet of where the blood trail ended & just figured a way to hide itself.

wombat13
November 23, 2010, 08:21 AM
Nearly all of the deer I've taken have been with heart/lung shots. Some ran, some didn't. I'm finally getting used to the idea that just because the deer ran doesn't mean I blew the shot. I got two deer opening weekend this year, both with rifles more than sufficient for the task. I think they are good examples of how important shot placement is.

The first was taken with a .300WM at about 80 yards and the shot destroyed the aorta and left two good holes in the deer. That deer tried to run but only made it about five yards before it lost all blood pressure and collapsed. It looked like something out of CSI with the trees covered in blood spray. I wish I made that exact shot every time. Btw, there was no meat loss even with an "overkill" magnum because there is no useful meat on the rib cage.

The second deer was taken with an M1 Garand shooting 150 gr. Win ballistic silvertips. The deer appeared about 20 yards from me right at dawn. It knew I was there so I had to make a quick shot and am not experienced using the peep sight in low light. I fired and the deer took of running. I thought for sure I missed, but my BIL helped me track it down. I had hit it through the liver and it ran about 50 yards before collapsing.

I've had a number of DRT deer over the past few years as well. Some taken with slugs, one with a .338WM.

TexasPatriot.308
November 23, 2010, 08:29 AM
I drop big hogs in their tracks with a .17hmr. only kick a few times, put the bullet in the right spot. I have had them hit good with a .308 and not find them..just a hog so aint gonna lose no sleep trying to find them, deer are a different story, I will look for them as long as I have to.

LeverGunJunkie
November 23, 2010, 09:47 AM
Not to kick a dead horse, but I concur with 41magsnub. I think the adreneline in the deer and the deer's emotional disposition have a lot to do with it. Obviously shot placement has a say; breaking weight bearing bones never hurts either. The two deer I shot last year w/ my .308 died within 25 yrds of impact, but neither left a blood trail (both had exit wounds; lung/heart).

This year, I shot a very aware 8 pointer at 75 yrds I had just spooked. I was using a 300 WSM with 180gr PSP (Winchester Super-X). The deer was quartering toward me exposing his left side. I aimed for the front shoulder, but between the horrible trigger on the BLR and buck fever, I think I pulled the shot slightly right, entering at the lung, but traveling thru the length of the body cross-ways with no exit. No blood trail and the deer acted like I missed. :scrutiny: Searching for an hour I gave up thinking a miss. :banghead: The farmer who's property I was hunting drove up to me as I was walking back to the truck, with my nice 8 pointer in back of his truck. I would've lost that deer for sure if not for him. That 180gr bullet did ridiculous internal damage, but that deer still ran about 250 yrds without showing a sign in blood, hair or the way it reacted. Sorry for the story but it seemed relevant to the conversation

It seems to be a crap shoot sometimes.

jimmyraythomason
November 23, 2010, 10:01 AM
I shot a very small doe running directly away from me with a 30.06,150gr Win.Silver Tips. I shot it directly under the "flag" at about 30 yards. This was at dusk and by the time I found any blood it was dark. Three of us hunted the deer by flashlight until it started raining. We had found some intestines draped across a patch of briars but nothing else. We left and came back the next day. After searching the area(rain had washed away ALL sign) I finally found the deer about noon 150 yards away from the shot. The deer had been completely eviscerated and the chest cavit was devoid of any organs(probably from predation). The deer was so small I lifted it by it's hooves and set it over the barbed wire fence.

Art Eatman
November 23, 2010, 10:35 AM
I've had a couple of chest-hit deer drop to their knees and then jump up and run maybe fifty yards before quitting. Almost all the others fell where they were standing when hit.

I lost one buck to a chest shot; never did find him. My father and I worked for over an hour. Odd deal: I saw blood fly from the off side as it arced toward the ground under his belly line. Some blood on the ground, but not much. He went down, got up, and boogied.

Outside of that one buck, though, I've never had to do any chousing around after the shot. Granted, the majority were neck shots...

Second-hand hearsay, of course, I've heard beaucoup stories along the lines of, "I hit him in the heart, but that danged deer musta run a mile!"

blitzen
November 23, 2010, 11:37 AM
Don't worry much about what you can't control. Well hit deer can and will do the strangest things. Always use good tools, ie, your 30-30 and core-lokts, make good boiler room hits the the recovery will not be far off.

huntinggamo
November 23, 2010, 11:47 AM
I dont know where you are located but here in colorado i had the same question, i asked a DOW officer and this is the response i got...
Q: If i shoot a deer or elk on public land and it runs onto private land what do i do?
A: Call the local sheriffs office, they will attempt to contact the land owner and or escort you onto the property to recover the animal. if the landowner refuses access the sheriff will notify a DOW Officer and he will recover the animal, field dress it and bring it out to you.

The part i had a hard time believing is that a dow officer is going to gut my animal out for me...lol

Please let me know if you have heard the same or know different than what i was told

TNboy
November 23, 2010, 12:32 PM
If you are using a 30-30 give the Hornady Leverlution bullets a try, first ballistic tip made for a 3-30. I've dropped 3/4 of deer I've killed in their tracks and I've never aimed for the shoulder, I see no point in wasting that meat, I always shoot just behind the shoulder, has worked great for me so far.

jimmyraythomason
November 23, 2010, 12:38 PM
The part i had a hard time believing is that a dow officer is going to gut my animal out for me...lolThat would be tax dollars well spent!

wombat13
November 23, 2010, 12:59 PM
I dont know where you are located but here in colorado i had the same question, i asked a DOW officer and this is the response i got...
Q: If i shoot a deer or elk on public land and it runs onto private land what do i do?
A: Call the local sheriffs office, they will attempt to contact the land owner and or escort you onto the property to recover the animal. if the landowner refuses access the sheriff will notify a DOW Officer and he will recover the animal, field dress it and bring it out to you.

The part i had a hard time believing is that a dow officer is going to gut my animal out for me...lol

Please let me know if you have heard the same or know different than what i was told
If that's true I would hunt close to a property line and hope the deer ran onto the neighbor's property every time. J/K

ranger335v
November 23, 2010, 01:25 PM
"Average distance a well hit deer will run"

Average? Well, lessee. I've had a few drop in their tracks. About the same number have run maybe 150 yards. So ... average of 75 yds.? Typically, with a double lung hit, they will run 30-50 yards before passing out on their feet in a few seconds no matter what I hit 'em with; arrow or .243 or .35 Rem or 7 mag or .30-06.

H&Hhunter
November 23, 2010, 08:30 PM
Average distance a well hit deer will run

Between 0 and 500 yards. I am not being sarcastic here I've seen perfectly hit deer go a LONG way before dying.

Yarddog
November 23, 2010, 09:26 PM
As stated by a few, The shots I have taken in the last 20/25 deer were Neck shots, No farther than 100yds & they Drop like a sack of potatoes ; )
Y/D

joshk-k
November 23, 2010, 10:31 PM
It seems like it would be really hard for something to run with its scapula blown apart. I understand that that creates more wasted meat than a shot behind the shoulder, but they almost certainly won't run as far.

JOsh

bang_bang
November 24, 2010, 08:18 AM
I've taken quite a few deer, and most of the time *if* they run it's no more than 50 yards. If I can (the deer must be completely broadside before I will do this) I try to shoot them through the shoulders. Not only does this "flatten it's tires," but takes out the lungs and heart.

jimmyraythomason
November 24, 2010, 09:30 AM
. Not only does this "flatten it's tires," but takes out the lungs and heart. It also destroys a lot of good meat.

CoRoMo
November 24, 2010, 09:50 AM
My averages are short distances. Most have dropped in their tracks like a sack of pudding. Others have made it 10 yards, 20 yards, 30 yards, etc. Then there was that one cow elk. I hit her good, square, and solid through the shoulders. She piled up a couple hundred yards from where she got hit.

wildman6809
November 24, 2010, 10:38 AM
the only deer that i have had to track were the ones that knew where i was. most just run about 10 yards and fall over.

bang_bang
November 24, 2010, 03:17 PM
It also destroys a lot of good meat.

There isn't enough meat on the shoulders for me to mess with, unless I want to roast a whole shoulder. If I do want the shoulders, a <100 yard headshot will save that said meat.

I often hunt a long ways from the house, with no 4-wheeler or truck to haul the deer out with. If I shoot a large deer that will be a pain to drag, I'll quarter it up in the field, pack the meat in my backpack, then drag the deer into a thicket out of the field. I always carry a trash-bag or two and a hatchet in my backpack just in case.

jimmyraythomason
November 24, 2010, 04:23 PM
There isn't enough meat on the shoulders for me to mess withWow,you must have very small deer. Our does have small shoulders but there is quite a lot of good venison on a buck's shoilders,even a young one.

EmbarkChief
November 24, 2010, 04:34 PM
I'm with Daniel Boone on this one. If my deer does anything more than a bang/flop I'm mad:fire:. Now, I did have a doe a few years back run about 35 yards after I shot her in the back of the head. That's right, the back of the head with a .280 ballistic silvertip at about 100 yards. When I found her the ammount of brain matter in what was left of her skull was about the size of a pecan:uhoh:. Go figure. Shoot them in the neck or the head, do your part and the vast majority of the time they aren't going anywhere.

jimmyraythomason
November 24, 2010, 04:39 PM
I'm seriously considering using my Stevens Model 200 in .223 with 75gr. hollow point match ammo and taking head shots only.

336A
November 24, 2010, 05:59 PM
As the others here have stated most of the time you can expect them to travel up to 50 yards, while some may make it 100yards. Of course if you can attain a CNS hit they will drop on the spot. However with that being said, the most consistent drop em' in their tracks instantaneous dirt nap pill I've ever used or seen is the shotgun slug12 or 20 GA. Not even my 7mm Rem Mag drops deer as fast or with as much consistency as a shotgun slug, there is a lot to be said for a large heavy piece of lead.

I don't go for neck or head shots always behind the shoulder or on the shoulder. Several of the deer dropped to the ground before I was able to recover from the recoil and rack another round in the chamber, causing to think I missed the deer. When I was growing up in the Southern Tier region of NY we were mandated to use shotguns with slugs only.

I still remember my very first deer I shot. It was a doe and she was only about 40 yards away. I was using what was at the time the new state of the art wasp wasted Win Supreme 3" sabot slugs. I saw the reaction of this deer when the slug hit her and I couldn't believe my eyes. She hit the ground hard and quicker than double greased lightning, she just laid there as though she was bedded down.To say that I was awe struck would be an understatement.

I asked my BIL who has shot more deer than anyone I know personally about his experience on this subject as well. Even though most of the counties down there have now allowed the use of rifles my BIL still uses his trusty ol' Ithaca M37 12GA Deer Slayer. He stated to me that in his experience as long as he put the slug in the vitals it was instant dirt nap time for the deer. If he made a bad shot well then he may end up doing a lot of tracking same as with a rifle.

I asked my BIL why he never went to using his Marlin .35 Rem now that they can use rifles. He stated that he likes how the ol' Deer Slayer lays em' down and that he don't have to do any tracking. I can't really argue with his logic or reasoning as he has about 20 years on me and put a lot more deer in the freezer than I have.

AKElroy
November 24, 2010, 07:58 PM
It seems like it would be really hard for something to run with its scapula blown apart. I understand that that creates more wasted meat than a shot behind the shoulder, but they almost certainly won't run as far.

If you center punch the shoulder, they are not taking a step. I shot one through the shoulder two weeks ago, (I was aiming for the boiler room, just pulled it or he moved a little) and he jumped from his hind legs over the pen fence & did a header into the dirt because the joint was gone & it could take no weight. That's the only one I've seen jump; most just flop. It does ruin a good 4th of the deer, though.

IndispensableDestiny
November 24, 2010, 08:49 PM
When hunting in my woods, if a deer runs, it runs as far as the swamp. Then it dies. They know how much trouble it is to drag them out of the swamp.

JDMorris
November 24, 2010, 09:27 PM
If your not going to mount it just shoot the head? makes enough sence?

336A
November 25, 2010, 08:37 AM
If your not going to mount it just shoot the head? makes enough sence?


Young man I suggest that you actually get off of the computer, couch, or play station and do some actual hunting. You need a serious wake up call, hunting big game is not Sniping, and head shooting big game animals is far from being ethical. As a matter of fact aiming for the head is the worst shot to take as it is a small target and in constant motion.

One slip or if the animal moves slightly and the next thing you have on your hands is a wounded animal, yeah smart move there wise guy. Deer and most other herbavoirs are very weary and alert animals they're heads are almost always in constant motion. Head shooting deer is just asking for trouble.

Furthermore head shots in actual combat situations is not even preferred, due to the high probability of a miss we always aim COM and if hunting one should always aim for the vitals. Unlike you I have been to and graduated from the school and spent many hours behind the scope in a hostile combat environment. Heck I've been in the Army longer than you been on this earth. I have almost 20yrs of actual hunting experience and more than 3yrs spent deployed, so yes I've got actual experience under my belt. Stop pretending to be something that your not and offering advice on a topic you have no knowledge about.

jimmyraythomason
November 26, 2010, 01:22 PM
If your not going to mount it just shoot the head? This is a very reasonable question that deserves a serious answer. A head shot is a VERY dangerous shot. There is TOO much at stake if the shot is off by even an inch or two. A deer with it's lower jaw shot away is likely to die a slow death by starvation. A deer's head,even a large deer,is a fairly small target and easy to miss. No doubt,a good brain shot is the only certain DRT shot,it isn't worth the risk. I jokingly said I might use my .223 for head shots but I would never SERIOUSLY consider that as a hunting method.

03Shadowbob
November 26, 2010, 01:35 PM
My deer have mostly been DRT with high lung and spine/neck shots. I posted a pic up not long ago of a cowhorn buck I killed where he had the froth coming from his nose and was dropped right where I shot him which was in between the spine and lung. I figure the shockwave did quite a bit of the damage to both the spine and lungs.
The only deer I have had to track were the ones with chest/lung/heart shots. I prefer not to track deer so I make sure I have a good scope and am dead on with the ammo I use. IME, it doesn't matter whether it is a 30-06 or a 223 round.

countertop
November 26, 2010, 03:16 PM
I've hit dead on a deers heart with my .280 Remington, blowing the heart - in pieces - out of a softball sized hole on the other side of the deer. Even that deer ran a good 45 yards.

I've had double lung shots run 100 yards, and had them dead right there.

I do agree though that a shoulder shot - or a high neck shot - will send the deer down right away.

Greybeard
November 26, 2010, 09:45 PM
Question: "I'm wondering what happens in real life." Previous posts show how incidents can vary. Last season my brother shot a little cull buck through both lungs with 30.06 165 grain Hornady Light Magnum (left over from elk season). Altho not much bigger than a coyote, it ran into and bounced off a barbed wire fence and covered close to 200 yards before piling up. I shot another one just about the same size with the very same load two weeks ago. 135 yards thru bottom of both lungs. It dropped on the spot, hardly even twitched. Go figure.

A couple of years ago, I shot a big boar running, quartering away, at about 100 yards with the same load. That bullet hit one of the ribs, blowing it up and taking out two more ribs and subsequently fragments of all of the above ripping up the heart. That 240+- pound hog still ran a typical 40 yards.

All of this, and examining many field dressed deer and elk, leads me to believe that how far even a well-shot animal runs can be highly dependent upon what the bullet strikes within the first inch of penetration.

d2wing
December 1, 2010, 06:33 PM
As for waiting, It's a stardard practice. If unchased a deer will often lay down, bleed out and die, but if you track too soon they will get up and run, some times the bleeding stops or they just don't die and you lose them. A deer can also hide very well and be very hard to find. I found one tunnelled under tall grass and another snuggled up to and nearly under an old log. Both took a long time to find.

ssfeldjager
December 1, 2010, 06:47 PM
Found this while surfing...

Tracking Wounded Deer
http://forum.gon.com/showthread.php?t=571151

d2wing
December 1, 2010, 06:59 PM
Great link! thanks ss.

Davek1977
December 2, 2010, 04:00 AM
I've never had a deer run farther than maybe 25-30 yards. Of course, I use a 7mm mag, and tend to go for shoulder shots, and oftentimes take the spine out as well. I've yet to lose a deer, though I have seen deer that went down in a pile, and remained down for a few minutes, get up and run away when hit with what by all accounts appeared to be a solid shot with a .243. I know the argument is constantly raging about what constitutes "enough" gun for deer hunting, but its my opinion that the centerfire .22s and even 6mm/.243 are better left as varmit rifles. They simply aren't always up to the task of killing large deer quickly and effectively, from my personal observations.

Art Eatman
December 2, 2010, 09:29 AM
"...from my personal observations."

Yup. And everybody's different. I've tagged a couple-dozen bucks and killed maybe a dozen or so culls with my .243. None of them moved from where they were hit.

Which is why there ain't no "average" running distance after the shot on Bambi. :)

jimmyraythomason
December 2, 2010, 09:35 AM
Which is why there ain't no "average" running distance after the shot on Bambi. That pretty much sums it up. Shot placement,individual deer(size,state of alertness,etc) and least of all caliber of firearm/bullet weight(until you get into .50BMG territory),bullet performance, contribute to after shot run distance.

dacavasi
December 6, 2010, 12:33 AM
There are a few videos on the popular home-media sites that show boiler-room hits using a .50 BMG, and the deer actually runs 50 or 60 yards, with it's complete chest cavity blown wide open on the exit side. Don't get me wrong, I personally deplore that kind of 'sportsmanship', and won't get started on my opinion of the participants, but it just goes to show that there is no guaranteed DRT hit outside of a CNS...

shaggy430
December 6, 2010, 10:04 AM
I've found if a deer is already alert of your presence, then a heart/lung shot deer will tend to run farther than one that is calm.

jimmyraythomason
December 6, 2010, 10:05 AM
I've found if a deer is already alert of your presence, then a heart/lung shot deer will tend to run farther than one that is calm. I have seen this as well. It does tend to make a difference.

birdbustr
December 10, 2010, 10:24 PM
I agree. If they are spooked, the adrenaline may make them go a little further. I've taken deer with a 30-06, 7mm-08, 7mm STW and a 30-30. I've never tried a neck shot, but if you hit in though the shoulders they go down right away with any of those calibers. If you shoot behind the shoulders, which I usually shoot to preserve the forward shoulder meat they run about 50 yards with almost anything. If you want them to drop break bones in the shoulder (scapula or spine). If you want that forward meat, shoot behind the shoulders or try the neck shot.

TexasPatriot.308
December 10, 2010, 10:28 PM
how would you even consider average? even if a thousand people entered their experience, stlll, wouldnt mean squat....

SleazyRider
December 10, 2010, 10:50 PM
The stakes are even higher for those of us who are red/green colorblind---a full seven percent of the male population! I can't follow a blood trail across a mowed lawn; so unless there's snow on the ground, I can't track 'em. So it's important for me to drop them in their tracks, or very nearly so. I pass up a lot of "iffy" shots for that reason, and usually limit my shots to 100 yards, always aiming just behind the fronts legs.

Kachok
December 10, 2010, 10:53 PM
I must just be lucky, I have never had to track anything I have shot, and I usualy don't use a cannon just my puney little 6.5x55 (140gr SSTs). I would be so mad if I had to track the first one I shoot with my hotrod WSM LOL

jetsfan-24
December 10, 2010, 11:47 PM
I just shot a nice 6 point with a 257 wby mag took out both lungs and he still ran 30 yards like everybody says one will fall the next one will run

RevDerb
December 11, 2010, 01:51 PM
Run? :confused: :eek:

Two shots; two deer. Only had to walk to the place where they stood when I pulled the trigger. :neener:

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
December 11, 2010, 07:23 PM
I've found if a deer is already alert of your presence, then a heart/lung shot deer will tend to run farther than one that is calm.

True as can be. Had them drop right there and had them run 100+ yards with no heart at all!

The stakes are even higher for those of us who are red/green colorblind---a full seven percent of the male population! I can't follow a blood trail across a mowed lawn; so unless there's snow on the ground, I can't track 'em. So it's important for me to drop them in their tracks, or very nearly so. I pass up a lot of "iffy" shots for that reason, and usually limit my shots to 100 yards, always aiming just behind the fronts legs.

Im pretty much red color blind (looks mostly grey to me) so I depend on the shine of fresh blood. It is rough to say the least since I bow hunt. It's why I am a firm believer in waiting 30 or more minutes at LEAST even on DRT shots that I can see the deer laying there. I have seen more than one get up and run after laying there for 10 minutes looking dead. I think some of them deer have opossum blood in them!

Like a few other have said, there really is no average a deer will go barring a CNS hit. I personally LOVE the high shoulder shot. Smacks the lungs and, more than likely, will get some spine shock to drop it right there.

WTBguns10kOK
December 11, 2010, 07:25 PM
In my experience, they run towards me, so there's no need to track. It's kind of like they know the game's up so they just wanna help.

Ruger4Life
December 11, 2010, 07:55 PM
My experience has been if you catch the deer unaware before any adrenalin builds up, a boiler room shot drops it right there or within 10 yards. Just bang.. flop.

If you get one that has the fight/flight response going a non-CNS or non-structural hit will let them run for a short distance.

A poorly placed shot in either case can result in some tracking.


Yup, I concur.

Shot 3 deer with my .44mag this season.

The gun: Ruger SRH 7-1/2" w/iron sights.

Handload: 310gr Oregon Trail Trueshot Hard Cast GC, over 21.0gr of WW-296, New R-P brass case, Fed Match Mag Primers, heavy roll crimp applied, approx 1250fps.

1st Deer: Shot through lungs @ 20yds. Buck didn't make it 10yds and collapsed in a heap.

2nd Deer: Doe shot @ 30 yds. Ran 20 yds and collapsed. Heart shot.

3rd Deer: Doe shot @ 25 yds. She smelled me and snorted, but went back to grazing before I shot her. Lung shot. After the shot she circled around where she had come from and made it another 100 or so yards and laid down in a pond to die. IMO, she was excited and pumped up with adrenalin before I shot her and that is why she ran so far. Only thing I can figure out. The blood trail was tremendous, and after field dressing it was amazing that she ran, stopped, and ran again for so long, and so far.

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