Progressive Press Question


PDA






Carter
November 24, 2010, 07:10 PM
I'm new to reloading and was looking at getting a Hornady Progressive Lock-N-Load press. Can you guys tell me all I need for it to get started for 9mm?

Right now I've got the press itself, 9mm shell plate, manual, and a bullet puller. What type of dies/bushings will I need, and what else will I need to get to start off?

Thanks.

If you enjoyed reading about "Progressive Press Question" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Furncliff
November 24, 2010, 07:17 PM
I just bought that press for my self. I've been loading .357 magnum for a rifle. So far I like the press.

Sounds like all you need is a die set for 9mm and a set of bushings.


Books... like the ABC's of reloading. Also Load Data Books.

A scale... either beam scale or good digital.

You need to choose a powder and primers, cases and bullets. Hornaday has a deal where you get 500 bullets for buying the press and 100 bullets when buying the dies.



What else...????

Carter
November 24, 2010, 07:22 PM
As far as dies I primarily mean how many do I need. There are different sets. Forgive me, and my newbness.

Furncliff
November 24, 2010, 07:27 PM
There are four dies in this set up. One comes with the powder measure, the other three come in this set.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=667162

I don't know if Midway is the cheapest. They will also have the Hornaday Bushings. Very handy set up.



You probably know that this press can use any of the standard dies...Lee, RCBS, etc.. But the bullet deal is hard to pass up and the Hornaday dies are well thought of.

Furncliff
November 24, 2010, 07:34 PM
Bushings for the Lock-n-load http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=786036

Carter
November 24, 2010, 07:35 PM
Thanks

Steve C
November 24, 2010, 08:12 PM
A full set of bushings are included with a new press. This is confirmed if you read the description for the Hornady LNL Press (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=679228) being sold by Midway. Additional bushing would be needed for different caliber dies if you wanted to more rapidly change die sets to load different calibers. You can always pull one die set out of the bushings and replace with different dies.

You need to buy a complete set of 3 dies for the 9mm, a shell plate which you already have. I would suggest you get the Hornady Powder measure Pistol Rotor and meter (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=164839) as your charges for the 9mm will be smaller than the standard rotor and meter insert that comes with the Hornady powder measure will consistently dispense. You will also need a powder scale, either a balance or electronic, to adjust the powder measure and check powder throws intermittently for quality control. I personally prefer a balance and have an older scale equivalent to the current RCBS 5-0-5.

Walkalong
November 24, 2010, 08:21 PM
9MM dies (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=757170)

LNL Bushings (http://www.midwayusa.com/Search/#lnl%20bushings____-_1-2-4_8-16-32)

Calipers (http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch-digital-caliper-47257.html)

If you do not already have one, a scale (http://www.midwayusa.com/Search/#scale____-_1-2-4_8-16-32).

a 505 (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=758842) or a #2 (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=658771) would be my first choices.

SteveW-II
November 24, 2010, 08:31 PM
> I would suggest you get the Hornady Powder measure Pistol
> Rotor and meter as your charges for the 9mm will be smaller
> than the standard rotor and meter insert that comes with the
> Hornady powder measure will consistently dispense.

My LNL AP came with both rifle and pistol rotors and inserts.

cfullgraf
November 24, 2010, 09:44 PM
My Hordady L-N-L also came with both rotors but I read the catalog descriptions and ordered the one not included. So, I got a spare rotor.

Get a powder cop die. It helps with making sure powder is in the case before seating the bullet.

I like to taper crimp in a separate operation from bullet seating. If you resize and load on the Hornady at the same time, you will need the powder through the expander powder drop tube so that the powder measure will sit over the mouth expansion station. That will give you room for both the powder cop die and the taper crimp die.

Unless you can figure another way to confirm powder dropped in the case.

You might consider getting an inexpensive single stage press to learn the basics on. All the other stuff you need for the progressive can be used on the single stage although the dies would need to be reset when converting back to the progressive.

Single stage presses are handy to have around to do odd tasks from time to time. A Lee O-frame or a used press found at a gun show would be pretty inexpensive.

Lots of folks say loading on a single stage press first is not necessary and maybe they are right. But after 29 years of operating a single stage press, I found a progressive had a steep learning curve. Lots of stuff going on all at the same time. It is easy to make a mistake.

Another suggestion for learning is to get a hand priming tool. Separate the loading into a resize/expand step, prime off line and then a charge and seat bullets step. Process the brass in large batches. I found the primer system to be the most troublesome when getting started. By priming off line, you take it out of the progressive equation on priming.

Once comfortable with the reloading process, then you can safely scale up your production and crank out tons of great ammo.

By the way, I still load my rifle rounds on a single stage press.

You will like the Hornady L-N-L

rfwobbly
November 24, 2010, 10:39 PM
As far as dies I primarily mean how many do I need. There are different sets. Forgive me, and my newbness.

Carter -

"Newbness", that's a new one! Welcome to reloading. Newbness is not a crime here, brother.

I would advise you to get the Hornady 9mm "New Dimension" die set. You can work with the Lee 3 or 4-die set if short on funds, but your press is designed around the Hornady dies and they come with several added features to make your reloading more enjoyable. Besides you'll get additional free bullets with the dies, and you can't have too many free bullets.

All the dies you need will come in the "set". Rifle usually has 2 dies in the set, and pistol usually has 3, sometimes 4 dies in a set. Photo below shows a special 4-die set, it's not clear what caliber, but definitely not 9mm. The point is everything you need as far as dies comes inside that one red box.

http://images.gandermountain.com/products/large/423427_L1.jpg

You might check the prices at these 3 places... MidwayUSA, Graf & Sons, Mid South Shooters Supply.

Hope this helps!

oneounceload
November 24, 2010, 10:46 PM
You need a SCALE
You need several reloading MANUALS
You need to READ the STICKIES

You need to do your due diligence and not rely on the internet for your data

robctwo
November 25, 2010, 11:56 PM
Welcome to the obsession. I bought a LnL in '04. I have over 140,000 rounds through it. I have the Lyman dies for 9mm. RCBS for most of the rest.

I have three reloading manuals. I usually load in the low mid range of the suggested loads.

I am mentoring a new guy who lives across the street. Find an old time reloader if you can.

Don't try to run a full shell plate right off. Make one bullet all the way through. Check you bullet in your barrel after you remove it from the gun. Put a few rounds in your magazine before making too many to see that they fit. Make two bullets at a time all the way through. Get comfortable with the rhythm of the press. Don't hurry.

I make between two and three hundred rounds per hour. I load a couple nights per week in the winter to stockpile for the warmer shooting months.

The reloading can become just as much fun as the shooting. Many times my friends tell me we need to shoot some to get some more empty brass.

Pete D.
November 26, 2010, 07:08 AM
+1 about scale, manuals, and reading the stickies.....reading in general about the whole process before you load the first cartridge.
The ABC book is a solid recommendation.
Pete

longdayjake
November 26, 2010, 01:16 PM
I don't know how important a manual is. I have been reloading for years and I still don't own a manual. All of my information has come from the good old computer machine. Just make sure you do some kind of research. You don't absolutely have to buy a manual to learn how to reload.

Also, the hornady lnl is a good press, but I feel it is a tough one to get to "know." If you ever have any problems with the primer feed (mine acts up all the time) just send me a PM and I can help you figure out what to do.

Pete D.
November 26, 2010, 06:19 PM
information has come from the good old computer machine.
OK. That's your manual. Doesn't mean that a manual has to be on a bookshelf.

You don't absolutely have to buy a manual to learn how to reload.
True. You don't absolutely have to have an instructor to learn to fly an airplane....but its a lot safer if you do.
Pete

If you enjoyed reading about "Progressive Press Question" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!